An introduction to the fundamentals of the Spanish language, with an emphasis on active learning and a focus on comprehension, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students will develop communicative and intercultural competence by exploring the diversity of Spanish-speaking communities around the world. No previous knowledge of Spanish required.

Prerequisites
Students with SPAN 1XX (First Qtr Spanish) or SPAN 10X (SPAN 101 online) transfer credit may not take this course.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

Spanish 2 offers a slightly more accelerated introduction to the fundamentals of Spanish language for students with some previous knowledge of Spanish (1 or 2 years of HS instruction or equivalent). The course emphasizes active learning, focusing on comprehension, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students will develop communicative and intercultural competence by exploring the diversity of Spanish-speaking communities around the world.

Prerequisites
One or two years of high school Spanish, SPAN 101, or permission of the instructor. Students with transfer credit for SPAN 101 or SPAN 10X (i.e., 1st or 2nd quarter Spanish) may not take this course.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

This course accommodates students who have had fewer than three years of Spanish at the high school level or those who do not feel adequately prepared to enroll in Intermediate Spanish (SPAN 201), but who are also not appropriately placed to enroll in the first semester Elementary Spanish (SPAN 101) course. This is an intensive course covering the entire curriculum of the standard two-semester Elementary Spanish, in one semester. Students should consult Spanish faculty before registering to determine the appropriate level course to enroll in. Students should also be advised that taking SPAN 110 alone would not fulfill the foreign language graduation requirement; they will need to take SPAN 201 in order to satisfy the requirement.

Spanish 3 is an intermediate language course intended for students with some solid knowledge of Spanish (3 years of HS instruction, or equivalent). It is designed to provide students with an active learning experience as they strengthen their language skills and develop their intercultural competency. Students will advance their proficiency in the areas of comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. Cultural material will be integrated into these four areas to expand knowledge and cultural awareness of Spanish-speaking communities in the United States and around the world.

Prerequisites
Three years of high school Spanish, SPAN 102, or permission of the instructor.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

This course provides students with an active learning experience as they strengthen their language skills and develop their cultural competency. This course introduces students to advanced grammatical structures and focuses on specialized vocabulary used in professional fields including business, health sciences, and law. It emphasizes the development of comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultural material is integrated into these four areas to expand students' knowledge of Spanish-speaking communities in the United States and around the world.

Prerequisites
SPAN 201 or permission of the instructor.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

This course develops students' writing and editing skills in Spanish by exploring various types of writing (descripci?n, narraci?n, reportaje, exposici?n and argumentaci?n) and the processes needed to develop these styles of composition. As part of the mastery of the skills necessary for writing in Spanish, the course incorporates a review of key and complex grammatical structures.

Prerequisites
SPAN 201 or permission of the instructor.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

This course combines linguistic functions and structures with culture through an integration of listening, speaking, reading and writing activities. The course concentrates on improving oral fluency in Spanish by using the topics of Spanish and Latin American films, and their illustration of language in cultural context for class discussion.

Prerequisites
SPAN 201 or permission of the instructor.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

SPAN 205 introduces students to different variations (or dialects) of the Spanish language, paying special attention to the Spanish spoken in the United States (also known as Spanglish). It explores Spanglish through the voices of its speakers, as well as through texts and videos, facilitating reflections on why some varieties of Spanish, such as Spanglish, are perceived as less prestigious. The course also incorporates regular activities that practice intermediate and advanced grammar topics.

Prerequisites
SPAN 201 or permission of the instructor.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

More than 50 million Latinos live in the United States of America, which makes the U.S the second-largest Spanish-speaking country in the world. In this course, students analyze the cultural, historical, political and social experiences of U. S. Latinos, or ?Latinx America.? This course understands the place of Latinx communities in the rising U.S. nation as a political and economic agent that shaped the history of the world in the 19th and 20th century. First, the course examines the roots of the US Hispanic populations, and also how colonization imposed Hispanic cultures and languages in North, Central and South America. Second, the course analyzes the experiences of the Latinx communities in the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries through various topics: Latino immigration, practices of racisms and colonization, strategies of resistance, political and social movements, U.S. policies regarding Latino communities, and Latinx gender practices, among others. This course is taught in English.

Code
Humanistic Approaches

This course introduces students to the culture and civilization of Spain with emphasis on the history, art and prevalent cultural myths and practices integral to the development of the Spanish nation. This course considers the relevance of these cultural elements within an Hispanic context and a global perspective.

Prerequisites
One course from SPAN 202-205 or its equivalent.
Code
Knowledge, Identity, and Power

This course introduces the student to the culture and civilization of Latin America, with an emphasis on the history, visual art, music, and prevalent cultural myths integral to the civilizations and cultures of the region. The course considers the relevance of these cultural elements within a Hispanic context and a larger world perspective.

Prerequisites
One course from SPAN 202-205 or its equivalent.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

A study of the major genres of Hispanic literature through close analyses of selected masterpieces. This class prepares the student for more advanced studies in literary and cultural studies.

Prerequisites
Two courses from SPAN 202-205 or one course from SPAN 211 or 212, or equivalent.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

A panoramic survey of the literature of the Americas. The texts studied in the course reflect literary developments up to the present. Works to be discussed illustrates cultural elements that are evidenced in today's society. Latino Literature written in the United States may also be included.

Prerequisites
Two courses from SPAN 202-205 or one course from SPAN 211 or 212, or equivalent.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

A panoramic survey of Spanish literature from the early modern period to the present. Works to be discussed illustrate cultural, political, and social issues critical in the development of Spanish literature. This course has a multimedia component.

Prerequisites
Any one of SPAN 203, 204, 205, 210, 211, 212, or equivalent. Students with SPAN 2xx transfer credit have credit equivalent to 300-level SPAN courses at Puget Sound.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

This course considers the main cultural and literary issues of the Hispanic world as represented in the short story. Writers from both sides of the Atlantic are studied with emphasis on the close reading and analysis of the texts.

Prerequisites
Any one of SPAN 203, 204, 205, 210, 211, 212, or equivalent. Students with SPAN 2xx transfer credit have credit equivalent to 300-level SPAN courses at Puget Sound.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

This course examines poetry as an authentic expression of Hispanic literature. Writers from Spain and Latin America are studied with emphasis on the close reading and analysis of their poems, the study of meter, rhyme, and other elements of prosody, as well as writing critically about poetry.

Prerequisites
Two courses from SPAN 202-205 or one course from SPAN 211 or 212, or equivalent.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

An overview of Spanish cinema since the Civil War to the present. All films are studied in reference to the historical developments in Spain from 1939 to the present. Works by Berlanga, Bu?uel, Saura, and Almod?var are screened. Course includes required screening lab.

Prerequisites
Two courses from SPAN 202-205 or one course from SPAN 211 or 212, or equivalent.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

This course surveys Latin American cinema, with a particular emphasis on contemporary films. The acquisition of technical vocabulary will facilitate a careful examination of the selected works. Together with literary, critical, and theoretical texts, this analysis will lead to a broader discussion about the key cultural and social issues of the region.

Prerequisites
Two courses from SPAN 202-205 or one course from SPAN 211 or 212, or equivalent.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

This course covers approximately 200 years of Spanish drama. Students read complete dramas from several of Spain's most prolific playwrights while covering the major literary movements and tendencies of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Prerequisites
Two courses from SPAN 202-205 or one course from SPAN 211 or 212, or equivalent.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

This course explores major theatre pieces of the twentieth century and is organized around important theatrical centers in Latin America and the study of terminology related to the theatre. The two largest units focus on Argentina and Mexico, but the course also covers plays from Chile, Puerto Rico, Cuba, and some Chicano works. The growing importance of performance theory and art is included in the coursework.

Prerequisites
Two courses from SPAN 202-205 or one course from SPAN 211 or 212, or equivalent.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

Literaturx Latinx explores the heterogeneity of the Latina/o/x/e experiences in the U.S. The courses are designed to introduce students to the diversity and originality of artistic and cultural expressions of the Latinx population in the United States. Plays, poetry, essays, films, novels, and short stories are examined in their social, historical and political framework. Thus, literature becomes a place where identities and ideologies are articulated, debated and contested. While this course is not a survey of Latinx literary history, it introduces students to contemporary expressions of Latina/o literature. Plays, performance pieces, short stories, novels, testimonies, poems, essays, films, documentaries, and blogs help students understand the complex and often silenced histories of the Latinx communities. Through readings and discussions, students explore questions related to community building, migration and diaspora, racism and racial relations, transnational politics, discourses of power and privilege, and the intersections of sexuality, gender, race, and class. Most readings are in Spanish, with some in English and Spanglish. Discussion, writing assignments and tests will be conducted entirely in Spanish.

Prerequisites
Two courses from SPAN 202-205 or one course from SPAN 211 or 212, or equivalent.
Code
Knowledge, Identity, and Power

SPAN 310 offers in-depth study of literary and cultural topics in the Spanish-speaking world that are interdisciplinary in nature, multiregional in approach, and genre inclusive. As such, it incorporates short story, poetry, drama, essay, and film, and it covers several regions, including but not limited to the Southern Cone, Central America, the Caribbean, and Spain. Potential topics for this rubric are advanced culture courses, literatures of the periphery, narratives of the migration experience, advanced translation, linguistics, or any course which is interdisciplinary in nature. In addition to learning about the concrete topic of the class, students develop their critical skills, and improved their speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. Because content will change, this course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites
Two courses from SPAN 202-205 or one course from SPAN 211 or 212, or equivalent.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

This course explores the human experience of migration, exile, and/or diaspora by offering an overview of some of the more significant migration processes within the Spanish-speaking world, and by exploring the social, political, historical, economic and intellectual implications of those processes. The class consists of close readings of literary works in several genres, including poetry, plays, short stories and essays, and the screening of several films. It also includes readings on cultural aspects of and theoretical approaches to this phenomenon. Readings and visual texts are in Spanish and/or English, and all discussion and testing is in Spanish.

Prerequisites
Two courses from SPAN 202-205 or one course from SPAN 211 or 212, or equivalent.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

How do new ways of seeing and being seen shape the divergent experiences of modernity in Latin America? This is the basic question that SPAN 312 asks by examining a series of case studies that roughly span the last two hundred years of its history. "Modernity" is an object of much debate, but might be provisionally defined as the competing accounts of the major sociopolitical, economic, and cultural processes shaping our world. Traditionally, the foundational literary works of the so-called "lettered city" have been the sources privileged by scholars to understand Latin American modernities. Drawing on recent scholarship, this course adopts the interdisciplinary approach known as "visual culture" in order to understand how emergent technologies and their attendant practices have been instrumental in constructing and critiquing particular configurations of power. These may include photography, pavilions at international expositions, museums, performance art, and multimedia spectacles.

Prerequisites
Two courses from SPAN 202-205 or one course from SPAN 211 or 212, or equivalent.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

This course will provide students with an overview of Iberian feminism from a transatlantic perspective (Spain-the Americas). First, we will examine the origins of Iberian feminisms, paying special attention to transatlantic literary networks and spaces. In doing so, we will discuss key concepts around feminism and/or women's writing: the struggle over women's rights; women as a labor force and consumers; models of gender identity and nation building; sexual liberation, etc. Second, we will analyze the major global debates and challenges within contemporary feminisms (transfeminism, decolonial feminisms, ecofeminism or pinkwashing) and their articulation in the Iberian context. We will cover a variety of feminist artifacts and practices (short fiction, manifestos, performance, memoirs, poetry, strikes, etc.) with emphasis on how and why these texts often blur genre conventions.

Prerequisites
Two courses from SPAN 202-205 or one course from SPAN 211 or 212, or equivalent.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

This course analyzes the relationship between art, race, science, and sexuality in Latin America. In particular, we study the development of Eugenics in Mexico in the first three decades of the 20th century. The course is divided into four sections: first, we explore the historical development of Eugenics. Then, we examine the history of Eugenics in Latin America. Next, we focus our investigation on the Mexican School of Eugenics. In the final section, we scrutinize the influence of Eugenics in the 1925 and 1932 Mexican debates concerning art, literature, and nationalism -- emphasizing the connection between body taxonomies and artistic productions.

Prerequisites
Two courses from SPAN 202-205 or one course from SPAN 211 or 212, or equivalent.
Code
Language graduation requiremt

In this course, students develop an understanding of the main topics for Queer Latinx Studies, including current aesthetic, political, and theoretical frameworks to analyze Latinx art, cinema, literature, and performance. This course gives students the opportunity to study how queer Latinx artists are contesting civil and governmental oppression against non-heterosexual communities. Students understand the significance of dwelling and sexual embodiment for dissident artists and their political intervention in the public sphere. In this class, students will engage with questions of disability, immigration, legality, race, and sexuality in America. This course is taught in English, with some readings in Spanglish, a hybrid language that resulted from interaction between Spanish and English. Students seeking credit in the Spanish major or minor in Hispanic Studies must write their assignments in Spanish.

This course analyzes how artists articulated the idea of mestizaje (racial and ethnic mixing) in Mexico and the U.S from the 16th to the 21th century. This course is divided into three sections: in the first section, students will study the genesis and evolution of racial taxonomies in the viceroyalty of New Spain. This section will teach the students the conceptual history of the idea of mestizaje and its political implications. In the second section, students will examine how diverse artists and political institutions portray the idea of mestizaje creating the genre of Casta paintings. Casta paintings are one of the most important artistic expressions of the Spanish Catholic Empire. In the third section, the students will analyze how governmental and nongovernmental corporations developed the Mexican muralism artistic movement, and also how U.S Latinx artists reinterpreted the muralist conceptualization of mestizaje in the 20th and 21st Century. Particularly, the course will emphasize the artworks of Diego Rivera in Mexico City and Detroit, and the artworks of Sandra de la Loza, and Emilio Aguayo. Cross-listed as LTS/SPAN 376.

Code
Artistic Approaches

This special topics course is conducted as a seminar and varies in focus each time. The course offers students the opportunity to further examine, problematize, and research particular issues and forms of cultural productions as they relate to Latina/o Studies and communities in the United States. To this purpose, class sessions require students to explore the discursive specificities of assigned works as well as to consider and interrogate the critical and theoretical issues they raise. Students' thoughtful engagement with the material and ability to participate in productive dialogue bear directly on the quality of the knowledge produced throughout the semester. Cross-listed with LTS/SPAN 400.

An intensive study of selected works reflecting the intellectual, political, and aesthetic changes in Spain from 1140 to 1499 AD.

Prerequisites
Any Spanish class numbered 300-314
Code
Language graduation requiremt

This course examines the relationship between culture and politics in nineteenth century Latin America. Studying foundational works of Latin American literature alongside other, oft-ignored cultural artifacts, it traces the role of the people in the rise of the modern nation-state.

Prerequisites
Any Spanish class numbered 300-314
Code
Language graduation requiremt

A survey of Spanish literature between its two golden ages; close reading of selected texts; consideration of the Enlightenment, Romanticism, and Realism in a Spanish context; and examination of interplay among society, politics, art, and literature.

Prerequisites
Any Spanish class numbered 300-314
Code
Language graduation requiremt

A study of Spanish literature from the generation of 1898 to the present. Close readings of selected texts from all literary genres.

Prerequisites
Any Spanish class 300-311, or equivalent.

In this course, students examine how post-dictatorial Spain (from 1975 to present) remembers competing accounts of a recent violent past. First, the class analyzes a series of transatlantic cultural artifacts that constructed the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) and the anti-Francoist resistance as international battles against Fascism. Second, the class concentrates on the ways in which contemporary memory artifacts (films, graphic novels, memoirs, etc.) thematize ideological battles in gender, sexual, and racial terms, paying close attention to the divergent articulations of these conflicts by peripheral nationalisms within Spain (Catalonia, Basque Country and Galicia).

Prerequisites
Any Spanish class numbered 300-314
Code
Language graduation requiremt

The course introduces students to the principle tendencies, texts, and writers of twentieth-century Spanish-American narrative. The course focuses on novels and short stories as different as the Fantastic literature of Jorge Luis Borges, the nativism or 'indigenismo' of Miguel Angel Asturias, the literary chronicling literature of the Mexican Revolution of Juan Rulfo, the Magical Realism of Garcia Marquez, and the 'boom' and 'post-boom' works of South America's finest writers.

Prerequisites
Any Spanish class numbered 300-314
Code
Language graduation requiremt

Synthesis of various aspects of literary studies. Topics to meet special needs. Since content changes, this course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites
Any Spanish class numbered 300-314
Code
Language graduation requiremt

Independent study is available to those students who wish to continue their learning in an area after completing the regularly offered courses in that area.

Independent Study is available to students wishing to complete study in a topic not covered by a regular course.