This course serves as an introduction to Gender, Queer and Feminist Studies. It surveys the history of feminism, and then explores the rise and trajectories of gender studies and queer studies. The course engages with the ways in which gender, sexuality, race, class, ability/disability, and other facets of identity intersect with each other. Students will consider the implications of activism as well as the academic development of these disciplines, and they will engage with the ways that the readings touch upon their own lives.

Code
Humanistic Approaches

What has been the role of religion in gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBQT) politics? This course challenges the dominant picture of entrenched opposition between queer lives and religious traditions, and it investigates the complexity and variety of queer and religious engagement during the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries. This course covers the historical emergence of sexual and gender identity communities in the United States and the attendant formations of established religious teachings as backdrop and critical context for both opposing and supportive religious involvement LGBT politics. The course examines anti-queer religious responses but also spends significant time covering queer-inclusive religious advocacy, including liberal religious involvement in gay liberation, the formation of queer inclusive churches and synagogues and new spiritual communities such as the Radical Faeries, and religious involvement in political causes from AIDS/HIV activism, hate crimes legislation, and same-sex marriage. Crosslisted as GQS/REL 215.

Rather than approaching "queer" as a designated set of identities or a defined area of study, this course explores an ongoing question, asking: what kinds of bodies, desires, histories, and politics does queer describe? This inquiry includes Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex (LGBTI) lives and histories. However, students also look beyond these social identities to broadly investigate sexualities and genders that fall outside the cultural norm and analyze how these norms are constructed and contested.

Code
Knowledge, Identity, and Power

Gender Studies Publication is an activity credit for participation in a campus publication of literary and artistic materials related to questions of gender and sexuality. The program requires editing, reviewing, criticism, and oral discussion of manuscripts and artwork on a weekly basis. The program also includes active promotion and publicizing of the Publication as well as managing the Publication organization as a whole. May be repeated for credit up to a total of 4 units.

What does it mean to study sexuality? Does one?s sexual identity change over time? The course first covers some critical readings from feminist, queer, and scientific perspectives in relation to sexuality. Then, armed with these tools, students address key topics in the field around science and sexology, histories of sexuality, reproductive politics, queer theory and pedagogy, health, hook-up culture, body modification, sexual harassment and #MeToo, and global issues in sexuality.

Prerequisites
GQS 201

This course provides students with an overview of feminist and queer methodological issues and dilemmas and a variety of research techniques and methods. Students investigate the ethics and politics of research; how theories are incorporated sinto research; how evidence is gathered; and what counts as truth and authority at higher levels of abstraction. Students read collaborative research by women organizing around health issues in India and education in prison, an ethnography of transgender identity, a study of women living with HIV, the graphic novel Fun Home, and scientific studies of lesbian sexuality. Students come to understand how research methods direct research outcomes. This course emphasizes feminist and queer research as a deeply interdisciplinary endeavor, one that necessitates an appreciation for a variety of research approaches so that students develop the capacity to produce and learn from, in the words of Donna Haraway, "both vertical deep studies and lateral, cross-connecting ones."

Prerequisites
GQS 201

This course surveys the history/ies and development of feminist, gender and/or queer theories, with an emphasis on theories produced in the 20th and early 21st centuries. The course familiarizes students with key feminist, gender and queer theoretical debates and concepts, requires them to read, think, speak, and write critically about these theories; and encourages them to employ these feminist and queer theories and concepts in critical analyses of contemporary institutions and practices, as well as in their own lives. Topics examined include power, privilege, domination, identity, difference, intersectionality, post/colonialism, trans/nationalism, (standpoint) epistemology, anti/essentialism, discourse, performativity, gender, femininity, masculinity, sexuality, embodiment, and cyborgs.

Prerequisites
GQS 201 or permission of instructor.

This course is an inquiry into the relevance of Western Feminism and to the pressing new challenges of feminist theorizing and practices. It is an exploration of how indigenous feminism, which seeks to define, explain, and improve women's lives within patriarchal regimes of power might enrich this literature. Overall, the course addresses the intersections of race, caste, class, nationality and religion and seeks to provide students with an intellectually rigorous background in the development of South Asian scholarship and activism.

Prerequisites
GQS 201 recommended but not required.

In this course students examine the differences between traditional scholarship and a feminist approach to knowing. Participants engage in an independent research project of their choosing, sharing process and findings with other members throughout the semester. Completion of the class includes participation in the Lewis & Clark Undergraduate Gender Studies Conference in March of each year.

Prerequisites
GQS 201 and 360, GQS minor or major, or permission of instructor.

Research under the close supervision of a faculty member on a topic agreed upon. Application and proposal to be submitted to the department chair and faculty research advisor. Recommended for majors prior to the senior research semester.

Research under the close supervision of a faculty member on a topic agreed upon. Application and proposal to be submitted to the department chair and faculty research advisor. Recommended for majors prior to the senior research semester.

One of the four learning objectives for GQS students is to to integrate feminist, gender and queer analysis into educational and activist practices, both in (a) students' research, writing and classroom interactions and in (b) public scholarship, activism, and everyday life. This internship fulfills (b) of this learning objective. Students will identify an internship with a community or government agency dealing with issues relevant to gender, feminism, or sexuality, such as the Rainbow Center of Tacoma. Students will take fieldnotes, write five reflection papers (one every other week), and complete a polished reflection paper at the conclusion of the internship. Students will create an e-portfolio to document their learning experience, including the following: learning objectives, weekly fieldnotes, internship responsibilities, work products, and their takeaways from the experience. Students must meet every other week with their supervisor (a member of the GQS Advisory Board and/or the Director of GQS). Students must participate in a minimum of 120 internship hours and attend the course. Taken during the junior or senior year. Internships may be self-determined or located through Career and Employment Services or Experiential Learning. All students must complete and file a learning agreement in the Department of Experiential Learning.

Prerequisites
GQS 201 and approval of the Gender and Queer Studies Director and the Department of Experiential Learning.