This course explores the interactions of Asian peoples ' the commodities, social practices, and ideas which they produce ' across borders, both political and imagined. The course crosses disciplinary borders, as well, drawing upon divergent materials from the humanities and social sciences in an attempt to do justice to a contemporary context that could be called 'Asia in motion.' An underlying thesis holds that, since nineteenth-century colonialism, nations in the 'West' and 'Asia' participate in a global, dialectical movement in which notions of identity (national, cultural, ethnic, religious, territorial, linguistic) share moments of fluidity and fixity.

Prerequisites
Two Asian Studies courses or permission of the instructor.
Code
Connections

This course is designed as a one-time offering for upper-division students participating in the 2020-2021 Pacific Rim Study Abroad (PacRim) Program. Our course studies Korean art from the Neolithic period to the contemporary moment, covering more than 3,000 years of history. We will discuss objects from a range of media, including ceramics, painting, secular and religious architecture, garden design, woodblock prints, and memorials. This course aims to familiarize students with both individual works of art and the larger historical contexts of the works' creation. Through analysis of the art, we will explore how geography, political regimes, religion, and technology reflect and construct a conception of what it means to be "Korean."

Prerequisites
Acceptance into the PacRim program.

Japan is both a part of, and apart, from its East Asian neighbors and over its long history it has absorbed and then adapted numerous cultural, religious, political, linguistic, social, philosophical and intellectual elements from its neighbors. Focusing on Japan's "modern" experience, this course will place Japan firmly in its East Asian context, while at the same time examining those elements that make the country uniquely Japanese. In its exploration of Japanese history, the course will start by examining the Tokugawa period (1600-1868) and the roots of modern Japan. This course will then bring its main focus to Japan's rapid modernization that began with the Meiji Restoration of 1868. The course also examines Japan's industrialization and its military modernization, its expansion in the early 20th century, and its experience during the Pacific War (WWII) period. Finally, the course turns to Japan in the postwar period as it sought to redefine its place in the international community.

Prerequisites
Acceptance into the PacRim program.

An overview of diversity and change in Southeast Asia, with a focus on, and field component in, Indonesia and Thailand. Students will examine the origins and development of complex state societies from an in-depth, ethnographic perspective. Students will explore issues of religious syncretism, gender, agriculture, the cultural impact of European colonialism, and the post-colonial period of nation building in Southeast Asia. Students will also delve into geographically focused case studies, which look at the cultural component of many important issues facing the region, including environmental decline and deforestation, the impact of globalization, the problems of ethnic and religious minorities, and other socio-cultural issues. The second half of the course will examine economic and political processes shaping the region. Specific topics include the economic legacies of colonialism, contemporary patterns of economic growth, patterns of change in rural communities, the process of urbanization and challenges faced by residents of Southeast Asian cities, the role of the state in managing development, democratization and human rights in Southeast Asia, and demographic patterns. The international portion of the course lasts approximately two weeks, and features an immersive stay at local universities in Indonesia and Thailand. The field component is required, and includes guest lectures by local scholars, trips to cultural and historic sites, ethnographic projects, and potential trips to neighbouring areas. Students will be responsible for their own airfare, as well as other potential program fees.

Prerequisites
SOAN 200 or IPE 201, application and instructor permission.

This 0.25 activity course provides preparation and pre-trip orientation for students selected to participate in the PacRim Program. This course is the first part of a two-course sequence required for PacRim students: in the Spring semester of the year prior to studying and traveling in Asia, PacRim students will also enroll in ASIA 402, a full unit course aimed at providing a shared academic foundation for course-work on PacRim. Asia 401 will begin to prepare students to participate in PacRim by ensuring that sufficient time and attention are devoted to important logistical, academic, and inter-personal issues.

Prerequisites
Acceptance into the PacRim program.

The purpose of this course is to prepare students for the year of study and travel in Asia. The focus of this course is primarily on academic preparation for the study-travel year in Asia, but will also include some practical matters. Because PacRim welcomes and encourages students from a variety of majors and with varying background on Asia, this course serves to ensure that all students on the trip have a shared foundation for course-work on PacRim, most especially preparing students for ASIA 495, the Independent Experiential Learning Project. This course is required for all students participating in the PacRim Program and serves as one of the two Asian Studies pre-requisite courses required of PacRim students.

Prerequisites
Acceptance into the PacRim program.

This course consists of independent research and the preparation of a significant paper of original scholarship. Each student seeking the Minor in Asian Studies as Robert Trimble Distinguished Asia Scholar must initiate a topic, identify a supervising instructor in the Asian Studies Program, and develop a plan for research, writing, and public presentation of the project. Alternatively, a student may meet the one-semester thesis requirement for the Distinguished Asia Scholar distinction in Asian Studies by an approved research seminar in a department participating in the Asian Studies Program.

Students trace a topic in multiple PacRim countries in order to develop a comparative, capstone project. Course deepens intercultural comprehension and deploys ethnographic methods of data-collection and observation.

Prerequisites
Acceptance into the PacRim program.

An independent study allows a student to pursue a specific topic not covered in existing courses, under the supervision of a faculty member. A written proposal must be submitted and agreed upon by the fauclty independent study advisor.

Prerequisites
Junior standing, a contract with a supervising professor, and department approval.