In this course, students explore the aesthetics and traditions of the theatrical art form through studies in acting, directing, design, playwriting, dramaturgy, spectatorship, and theatre history. Students encounter the diversity and complexity of the theatre making process by way of readings, lectures, discussions, play going, and workshop performances of scenes. Using critical and analytical tools studied over the course of the semester, students learn ways of exploring the theatrical experience both orally and in writing.

Code
Artistic Approaches

In this introductory course, students collaborate in the rehearsal and performance of scenes from contemporary plays. They engage mind, body, and voice in the fundamentals of acting: behaving truthfully in imaginary circumstances. In doing so, students develop greater confidence and awareness of the body and the voice as flexible instruments of communication. They acquire skills in relaxation, concentration, creativity, script analysis, and action execution, along with an introductory understanding of the Stanislavsky system of acting. Participation includes rigorous physical activity, vocal exercises, theatre games, improvisation, and scene work. All levels of experience welcome. Students must also register for the 215 lab.

This course introduces students to materials and methods used in the execution of designs for the stage. Projects provide hands-on experience with shop equipment for construction of two- and three- dimensional scenery, theatrical drafting, color mixing, scenic painting, and in the business of planning, scheduling, and organizing crews and the scenery shop for production. Reading assignments introduce major reference books in technical theatre and students begin the study of the history of scenery and technical practice.

Prerequisites
Permission of the instructor.

Through the lens of tradition and innovation, students explore contemporary theatre of the African Diaspora with an emphasis on the plays of Suzan-Lori Parks. Students in this and all contemporary world theatre courses engage with and collaborate in a set of informed, imaginative explorations of plays with a particular emphasis on dramatic action. They work toward the completion of this goal 1) by investigating, in light of performance, a play's dramaturgy both from within (formally) and from without (historically, culturally); 2) by cutting, arranging, and producing scenes from plays they are studying; 3) by discovering formal and thematic threads that run through the plays, readings, and topics of the class; 4) by considering ways to increase the breadth and depth of theatre productions at Puget Sound through course work grounded in the Knowledge, Identity, and Power rubric. Although contemporary world theatre classes have similar learning outcomes and a common methodology, the plays and fields of study (e.g. African Diaspora, Asian Theatres, Voices of the Americas) differ from one class to another. Taught in rotation with THTR 252, 254, and 256.

Code
Knowledge, Identity, and Power

Through the lens of tradition and innovation, students explore the dramaturgy of Asian theatres from classic forms (e.g. - Noh drama) to contemporary plays by Asian American/Canadian authors. Students in this and all contemporary world theatre courses engage with and collaborate in a set of informed, imaginative explorations of plays with a particular emphasis on dramatic action. They work toward the completion of this goal (1) by investigating, in light of performance, a play's dramaturgy both from within (formally) and from without (historically, culturally); (2) by cutting, arranging, and producing scenes from plays they are studying; (3) by discovering formal and thematic threads that run through the plays, readings, and topics of this class; (4) by considering ways to increase the breadth and depth of theatre productions at Puget Sound through course work grounded in the Knowledge, Identity, and Power rubric. Although contemporary world theatre classes have similar learning outcomes and a common methodology, the plays and fields of study (e.g., African Diaspora, Asian Theatres, Voices of the Americas) differ from one class to another. Taught in rotation with THTR 250, 254, and 256.

Code
Knowledge, Identity, and Power

Through the lens of tradition and innovation, students explore the dramaturgy of contemporary theatre from the Americas, north and south, including plays that speak to Latina/o experience. Students in this and all contemporary world theatre courses engage with and collaborate in a set of informed, imaginative explorations of plays with a particular emphasis on dramatic action. They work toward the completion of this goal (1) by investigating, in light of performance, a play's dramaturgy both from within (formally) and from without (historically, culturally); (2) by cutting, arranging, and producing scenes from plays they are studying; (3) by discovering formal and thematic threads that run through the plays, readings, and topics of this class; (4) by considering ways to increase the breadth and depth of theatre productions at Puget Sound through course work grounded in the Knowledge, Identity, and Power rubric. Although contemporary world theatre classes have similar learning outcomes and a common methodology, the plays and fields of study (e.g., African Diaspora, Asian Theatres, Voices of the Americas) differ from one class to another. Taught in rotation with THTR 250, 252, and 256.

Through the lens of tradition and innovation, students explore the dramaturgy of contemporary world theatre from the 1960s to the present with an emphasis on plays from North America and the United Kingdom. Students in this and all contemporary world theatre courses engage with and collaborate in a set of informed, imaginative explorations of plays with a particular emphasis on dramatic action. They work toward the completion of this goal (1) by investigating, in light of performance, a play's dramaturgy both from within (formally) and from without (historically, culturally); (2) by cutting, arranging, and producing scenes from plays they are studying; (3) by discovering formal and thematic threads that run through the plays, readings, and topics of this class; (4) by considering ways to increase the breadth and depth of theatre productions at Puget Sound through course work grounded in the Knowledge, Identity, and Power rubric. Although contemporary world theatre classes have similar learning outcomes and a common methodology, the plays and fields of study (e.g., African Diaspora, Asian Theatres, Voices of the Americas) differ from one class to another. Taught in rotation with THTR 250, 252, and 254.

Student participation in acting, scenery construction, lighting, costuming, and properties for a departmental production.

This course begins with a deeper exploration of the theories within the Stanislavsky system of acting, focusing on psychological, emotional, physical, and intellectual processes that aid the actor when entering the world of the realistic play. The course then moves to physical approaches to character based in clown traditions as a bridge toward absurdism. Over the semester students explore both physical and emotional approaches to developing characters and apply them to a range of dramatic styles in both lab and class work. Participation includes extensive scene work and rigorous physical and vocal activity.

Students must also register for the THTR 300 lab.

Prerequisites
THTR 215

In this advanced acting course, students must engage in rigorous text analysis, rehearsal, and performance of a variety of classical texts including the Greeks, French comedies, and Shakespeare. In the weekly lab, students train in Lecoq-based movement exercises, commedia mask work, voice, and stage combat. In doing so, students practice integration of language with the body and breath with thought. By acquiring skills in scansion, rhetoric, period movement, and vocal release, students develop tools for making engaging and honest acting choices with rich texts. Participation includes extensive scene work and rigorous physical and vocal activity. Students must also register for the THTR 310 lab.

Prerequisites
THTR 215

This course serves as an introduction to the process of theatrical direction through in-depth course work and an intensive practicum. Students build a foundation in visual composition, script analysis, scene work, and collaboration, using the classroom as a laboratory to practice communicating vision and working and working with actors. Students then apply their directorial approaches in rehearsal while developing administrative skills as they produce a culminating festival of student-directed one act plays and scenes for the public.

Prerequisites
Theatre Major, THTR 215, 300 or 310, and permission of the instructor.

A study of the history of architecture and interior design is combined with an exploration of techniques and styles of rendering and model construction. Contemporary theory and criticism within the field of scenography, methods of research, and play analysis are examined as tools for developing valid and original designs for the theatre.

Prerequisites
THTR 217.

The theory and fundamentals of costume design with practical application through rendering designs for specific characters in assigned plays are discussed. A general overview of costume history, period pattern drafting, and costume construction are examined.

In this seminar, students gain a better understanding of dramaturgy and the role it plays in the work of actors, designers, directors, dramaturgs, and playwrights. In addition to reading, writing, and talking about dramaturgy, students develop skills as theatre makers by participating in practical projects sponsored by the department that explore the relationship amongst dramaturgy, collaboration, community, and one or more of the following areas: devising, new play development, re-imagining the classics, and theatre education. This course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites
THTR 200 or 215 and permission of the instructor.

The course introduces students to the art and craft of playwriting by combining seminar and workshop formats in which members write, present, and revise monologues, dialogues, and sketches. Students work toward a final portfolio of this material as well as the completion of a short one-act play. The course also involves the analysis and discussion of published, produced plays; of conflict, suspense, characterization, plot, and other elements of drama; and of writing with actors, directors, producers, dramaturgs, and theatre audiences in mind. Cross-listed as ENGL/THTR 325

Prerequisites
ENGL 220 and either 227 or 228.

Incorporating a discussion of theories on the origins of theatre, this course explores the development of Western and non-Western dramaturgical techniques from the earliest records of performance through the Spanish Golden Age in Europe. Students examine the intersection of cultural history, theatrical practice, and dramatic literature by focusing on cultural context, the theatrical space, and performance conventions. Coursework includes scene reconstruction performances, research projects, oral presentations, and exams.

Prerequisites
THTR 200, 250, 252, 254, or 256

Through dramaturgical analysis, studies of artist biography, and creative projects, students explore how, why, when, and where people have made theatre from the mid-seventeenth century to the contemporary moment. Encompassing Western and Non-Western traditions, the class emphasizes the discontinuities produced by European modernism. Coursework includes scene reconstruction performances, research projects, oral presentations, exams, and an exploration of the student's personal vision for theatre in the contemporary world.

Prerequisites
THTR 200, 250, 252, 254, or 256

The place of this course in the curriculum is to allow the Theatre faculty to teach intensively in their particular fields of research and expertise and to allow students an in-depth study of one period or movement important in the history of drama. Students become familiar with research tools and methods of a particular period or movement and with the issues surrounding them.

Majors in Theatre Arts undertake a supervised project in their main area of interest. This could include dramaturgy, design, acting, or directing. The exact nature of the project varies but involves the extensive reading of plays, research, and the public presentation of the student's work.

Prerequisites
This class is only for Theatre Arts majors who are seniors.

Independent study is available to those students who wish to continue their learning in an area after completing the regularly offered courses in that area.

Independent study is available to those students who wish to continue their learning in an area after completing the regularly offered courses in that area.

Students who enroll in this course work with a faculty member in the Theatre Arts department to develop an individualized learning plan that connects the actual internship site experience to study in the major. The learning plan will include required reading, writing assignments, as well as a culminating project or paper.

Prerequisites
Approval of Tutorial professor and the Internship Coordinator.