This course introduces the basic skills and procedures that form the foundation of the physical therapy educational program. The course content includes passive range of motion, draping, positioning, and fundamental functional activities such as transfers and ambulation with assistive devices. This course exposes students to the various roles of the physical therapist as an independent practitioner and in conjunction with other disciplines. The course also introduces the medical documentation and the fundamentals of patient and caregiver teaching in multiple situations, all of which are expanded upon in subsequent courses. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition of the motor and interpersonal skills necessary to perform these procedures and to proficiently train patients and caregivers in the basic skills learned in the course.

This course introduces students to the practical and legal issues related to medical documentation and measurement in physical therapy using joint range of motion measurement and manual muscle testing as examples. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition of the motor skills and interpersonal skills necessary to perform these procedures.

Prerequisites
Successful completion of all first year first semester courses in the Physical Therapy program.

An in-depth study of clinical functional anatomy of the limbs and trunk, including osteology, arthrology, myology, neurology, angiology, and kinesiology. Biomechanics with application to the analysis of human movement is included. This course is designed to provide clinical knowledge and understanding of the neuromusculoskeletal systems as a foundation for the treatment of injury or disease via physical therapy.

An intensive study of the human nervous system, including structure and function, as a foundation for understanding neurological dysfunction and rehabilitation.

Prerequisites
Successful completion of all first year first semester courses in the Physical Therapy program.

This course introduces students to the concept of using research to inform clinical decision-making skills. Development of measurement and disciplined inquiry skills including emphasis on problem definition, research design, methodology, data analysis and statistical interpretation are stressed. Students learn a 5-step process to incorporate evidence into their PT practice and how to critically appraise multiple types of studies. The information is conveyed through didactic lectures, discussions, cases, and integrated journal club seminars. There is a large active learning component in this course. The overall goal of the course is to hone the student's ability to critically analyze the PT literature.

Students explore foundational understandings of what it means to be a professional in health care. Students will explore social issues such as forces that impact health care, the role of legislative and political bodies vis a vis health care, race and class as they impact health care and health seeking behavior, and the role of professional organizations as they impact the health professional. Students will be exposed to the PT Code of Ethics, and will have opportunities to explore their own development as a professional.

This course provides an overview of the etiology, incidence, pathology, and medical management of common cardiac and pulmonary conditions across the lifespan. Appropriate physical therapy examination and intervention strategies for individuals with either primary or secondary cardiac or pulmonary dysfunction are introduced both in the context of a specialized cardiac or pulmonary rehabilitation setting as well as in general physical therapy practice.

This course is a study of ambulation including the biomechanics of gait. Normal gait frames the course, followed by study of orthotic interventions for the adult patient. Gait characteristics of individuals with lower extremity amputation and the role of physical therapists in gait training and prosthetic management of individuals with amputation complete the course.

Prerequisites
Successful completion of all first year first semester courses in the Physical Therapy program.

This course begins with an overview of tissue healing and then explores the physiological and biophysical effects of physical agents as they relate to tissue healing and pain relief. A problem-solving approach to selection of the appropriate physical agent and intervention parameters is based on current evidence and clinical case examples. Course includes intensive hands-on laboratory experience with modern equipment utilizing both patient take-home devices and clinical models for development of skill in application of physical agents. Basic electrodiagnostic testing and PT use of biofeedback is introduced.

Prerequisites
Successful completion of all first year first semester courses in the Physical Therapy program.

This course is designed to provide the student with the necessary knowledge and skills to perform orthopedic musculoskeletal and neuromuscular evaluations and interventions utilizing manual therapy (to include spinal mobilizations manipulations, and lower extremity mobilizations and manipulations) and therapeutic exercise for the patient with lumbar spine, pelvis, and/or lower extremity pathology. Approximately 30 percent of class time is devoted to lecture on the basics of orthopedic management. This includes class time dealing with the theory of physical therapy assessment and treatment design. Emphasis is placed on the student's ability to interpret findings from a systemized evaluation and to develop appropriate pathology specific procedures including manual therapy, spinal manipulation, and therapeutic exercise based on current research and literature, as well application of biomechanical theory. The basics of radiologic spine imaging, lower extremity imaging, available imaging modalities, systematic scanning, and appropriateness criteria are covered in detail within this course and integrated into aspects of patient care. Laboratory experience comprises approximately 70 percent of class time for skill development. Clinical experience in the on-site clinic and internships provides opportunities to refine those skills, as well as synthesize information gained in the classroom and lab settings.

Prerequisites
Second year status in the Physical Therapy program.

This course is designed to provide physical therapy students with an understanding of the foundational principles of underlying exercise as a physical therapy intervention. The course first explores the fundamental principles of exercise, with a particular emphasis on the physiological effects of mobility, strength, and conditioning interventions across the lifespan. Instruction in exercise program planning stresses the need for prescribing therapeutic exercise with precision and consideration of each individual's unique medical history. Exercise interventions for the spine and lower extremities are the regional foci. At these regions, students learn both isolated and integrated techniques and the proper application of each. Finally, the course challenges the student's clinical decision-making as they learn to integrate therapeutic exercise with their evaluation/treatment classes.

Prerequisites
Second year status in the Physical Therapy program.

This course is designed to build on understanding and competencies developed in PT 642. In addition to the regional coverage of the upper spine and shoulder, this course explores the following topics: the use of screening examinations for application in a variety of injury prevention and performance settings; the application of strength and conditioning principles to both late rehabilitation and performance training; the evaluation of exercise products for effectiveness and utility in the clinical environment; gait and movement analysis in orthopedic and sports practice; and movement-based therapies outside the mainstream. Finally, the student's research and presentation of special topics in therapeutic exercise improves their ability to apply fundamental exercise principles to less commonly encountered impairments.

Prerequisites
Successful completion of PT 642 and second year status in the Physical Therapy program.

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of the neurophysiologic mechanisms of medications as they apply to physical therapy practice. Particular attention is addressed to medication interaction with physical therapy interventions including but not limited to exercise and joint mobilization or manipulation. Medication interaction with tissue healing and medication interactions with other medications or naturopathic remedies are studied. Typical medications for patient populations seen in each physical therapy discipline are addressed as well as how medication may interfere with typical tests and measures to assist in development of approximate physical therapy interventions. Physical Therapists do not prescribe medications and this course is not intended to suggest extensive knowledge in pharmacology.

Prerequisites
Successful completion of all first year first semester courses in the Physical Therapy program.

In this course, students will explore current theories of motor development and relate them to physical therapy case studies. They will develop knowledge of normal motor development, theoretical models of motor control, development, and learning principles. This will provide the basis for the study of common pathologies encountered in clinical practice.

Prerequisites
Successful completion of all first year first semester courses in the Physical Therapy program.

A continuation of PT 641, this course is designed to provide the student with the necessary knowledge and skills to perform orthopedic musculoskeletal and neuromuscular evaluations and interventions utilizing manual therapy (to include spinal mobilizations and spinal manipulations, upper extremity mobilizations and manipulations) and therapeutic exercise for the patient with cervical spine, thoracic spine, ribs cage, temporalmandibular and/or upper extremity pathology. Approximately 30 percent of class time is devoted to lecture on the basics of orthopedic management. Emphasis is placed on the student's ability to interpret findings from a systemized evaluation and to develop appropriate pathology specific procedures including manual therapy, spinal manipulation, and therapeutic exercise based on current research and literature, and biomechanical theory. Laboratory experience comprises approximately 70 percent of class time for skill development. Radiologic spine imaging is continued from PT 641, with content covering imaging of the cervical and thoracic spines, upper extremity, available imaging modalities, systematic scanning, and appropriateness criteria covered in detail and integrated into aspects of patient care. Clinical experience in the on-site clinic and internships provides opportunity to refine these skills, as well as synthesize information gained in the classroom and lab settings.

Prerequisites
Successful completion of PT 641 and second year status in the Physical Therapy program.

This course addresses the issues in pediatrics that are relevant to physical therapists. Emphasis is on movement of infants and children from the newborn period to 13 years of age. The course also applies the information on normal development to the many pathologies known to infants and children, particularly to cerebral palsy, meningomyelocele, pseudohypertrophic muscular dystrophy, and developmental delay; these four distinct diagnoses are used as models for the design of physical therapy programs for children with other pathologies. The assessment and treatment of premature infants is also addressed.

Prerequisites
Second year status in the Physical Therapy program.

Systemic processes affect the entire person as an organism. This course is a discussion and review of disease or alteration of several body systems. Each topic is covered with an overview of the pathology, and the medical management of the condition and how pharmacologic management affects physical therapy interventions. Patient cases are framed in the ICF model and the role of the physical therapist in acute, sub-acute, and chronic phases is investigated.

Prerequisites
Second year status in the Physical Therapy program.

This course is designed to prepare students to work with individuals late in the lifespan, particularly those age 65 and older. The content includes an overview of the physical, physiological, cognitive and emotional changes associated with aging as well as selected pathologies and challenges commonly encountered when working with older individuals. Students participate in health promotion and fall risk screenings for community-living older adults. Students are encouraged to integrate learning from other courses to select appropriate tests and measures and to identify and implement appropriate interventions for impairments and functional limitations commonly seen in the geriatric population.

Prerequisites
Second year status in the Physical Therapy program.

This course consists of integrated clinical experiences designed to give students an opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills in an on-campus clinic. Students observe and assist in the onsite clinic and participate in an exercise/wellness group. The companion seminar complements the integrated clinical learning experience with content including documentation skills, standards of practice, professional behavior and interdisciplinary collaboration. In addition, the seminar is used to facilitate the selection of full-time clinical internships through exploration of the factors that influence clinical education and strategies for progressive clinical and professional skills development.

Prerequisites
Second year status in the Physical Therapy program.

This integrated clinical experience course entails the analysis and synthesis of physical therapy concepts, skills, and values utilizing clinical experiences in the on-site clinic. Students work closely with clinical instructors (CIs) to participate in the examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis and intervention processes of individuals with impairments, functional limitations or changes in physical function resulting from a variety of neurological or musculoskeletal disorders. The course includes a weekly seminar designed to build on prior coursework with a focus on synthesis of academic and clinical work in best practice for patient management. In addition, the seminars prepare students for their clinical internships in terms of discussing logistics, professionalism, and non-patient care aspects of physical therapy.

Prerequisites
Second year status in the Physical Therapy program.

This course is a study of the assessment and treatment of adults with neurological disorders. Students explore common manifestations of neurological impairments and how physical therapy can intervene. Evidence based application of standardized outcome measures is also emphasized using the ICF model.

Prerequisites
Completion of first year of DPT.

The foundational neurorehabilitation models of treatment, current theory, and evidence are discussed. Students learn movement analysis and strategies for functional movement training using principles of motor learning.

Prerequisites
Completion of first year of DPT and PT 653.

This course teaches health promotion and prevention of secondary impairments in neurologic populations. Using SCI as a model patient for lifelong care, PT students are taught skills that span from acute care to aging with disability. Upper extremity preservation concepts are learned in conjunction with advanced transfer and wheelchair skills to maximize community participation potential. An overview of wheelchair seating and prescription for individuals with neurologic disability, as both health promotion and as intervention, completes the course.

Prerequisites
PT 653 and 654.

This fifteen-week, full-time clinical experience occurs off-campus and is designed to provide students with an opportunity for guided and independent experiences in providing physical therapy services to the public.

Prerequisites
Successful completion of all courses for years one and two of the DPT program.

The integrated clinical experience gives students an opportunity to further apply their knowledge and skills in a realistic clinical setting. Students work closely with clinical instructors to provide physical therapy services to individuals from the community with impairments, functional limitations or changes in physical function resulting from a variety of neurological or musculoskeletal disorders. In addition, students participate in health promotion and injury prevention programs, interdisciplinary collaboration, and begin to develop clinical teaching skills.

Prerequisites
Successful completion of all courses for years one and two of the DPT program. May be repeated for credit.

This course provides an introduction to salient psychological factors having direct bearing on effective physical therapy practice. Areas covered include psychological paradigms; utilizing collaborative psychological resources; classification and diagnostic criteria of psychopathologies commonly comorbid with patient conditions presented to the physical therapist; impact of locus of control on physical restoration, adherence, and functional independence; psychological reactions to disability; motivational principles and psychobehavioral predictive factors in exercise adherence; countertransference; psychological factors in chronic pain syndromes; psychosomatic theory; psychophysiology of the stress response; and application of therapeutic relaxation techniques.

Prerequisites
Successful completion of all courses for years one and two of the DPT program. May be repeated for credit.

Measurement and scientific inquiry skills are applied to clinical problems. Research is carried out under practice conditions. Communication and dissemination of the findings are in the form of a presentation to a forum of colleagues and a paper which meets scientific journal guidelines.

This course covers the role of physical therapists in administrative settings and leadership roles. An overview of the costs of providing physical therapy and who pays for services is presented. Constraints and benefits of care delivery in various practice environments are discussed. Leadership is presented as a vital skill for all physical therapists, ranging from treating a patient one-on-one to roles managing staffs, departments, and serving the profession through volunteer positions in state and national professional associations. Students learn to lead from any level and understand the role physical therapy leaders have in healthcare.

Prerequisites
Successful completion of all courses for years one and two of the DPT program. May be repeated for credit.

These courses are designed to build from students' basic backgrounds in a specialized area of physical therapy practice to a level of expertise and comprehensive understanding. Several topic areas are available each year. Course content includes basic medical science, clinical examination and intervention theory and practice, the opportunity to practice knowledge and skill in the treatment of actual patients, and synthesis of knowledge in a formal case report. Three topics are required.

Prerequisites
Successful completion of all courses for years one and two of the DPT program. May be repeated for credit.

This seventeen-week, full-time clinical experience occurs off-campus and is the culmination of the academic and clinical portions of the DPT curriculum. The experience is designed to provide students with an opportunity for guided and independent experience providing physical therapy services to the public.

Prerequisites
Successful completion of PT 657 and all required coursework for the DPT program.

This course is the analysis and synthesis of physical therapy concepts, skills and values utilizing clinical experiences at University of Puget Sound clinical internship facilities. This full-time internship occurs off-campus and consists of a minimum of twelve weeks designed to provide students with an opportunity for guided and independent experiences in providing physical therapy services to the public.

Independent study is available to those students who wish to continue their learning in an area after completing the regularly offered courses in that area.

An independent study course designed to provide the student with an opportunity to engage in a collaborative project with faculty. The student, with faculty supervision, develops an individualized learning contract that involves critical inquiry, clinical research, and/or classroom teaching.