This course provides workshops and meetings focused on college transition, team building, leadership and self advocacy skills, and goal setting.

This course provides workshops and meetings focused on college transition, team building, leadership and self advocacy skills, and goal setting.

Schools teach students much more than academics. Schools also teach right from wrong, and they send messages about who students are and who they can be. This course examines the nature of schooling and the socializing power of schools, using masculinity as its lens. Through readings, writing, discussion, and time spent in schools, students examine the hidden and official curriculum schools use to teach about gender and what it means to be a man. Successful completion of this course requires a commitment to spend regular time in schools, participating in the formal curriculum and observing the hidden curriculum.

Teaching students to read is a fundamental task of teachers in every class and grade level. This course examines the nature of reading and provides an introduction to well'balanced reading instruction in grades K'12. Through readings, writing, discussion, and time spent in schools, students are introduced to the nature of reading, how young people learn to read, and instruction that fosters lasting literacy. Successful completion of this course requires a commitment to spend regular time in schools, participating in the teaching of reading or writing.

Educating children living in poverty poses significant challenges to schools and teachers. This course is designed to allow individuals interested in schools to develop a greater understanding of poverty and to examine what teachers can do to provide the best possible education for students experiencing poverty. This course examines and confronts the American stories of rugged individualism and of the United States as aplace where class and race are irrelevant, while maintaining a focus on what teachers can do for the children with whom they work and the society in which they live. Successful completion of this course requires a commitment to spend 14 hours outside of class interacting with students living in poverty.

The history of legislated and de facto everyday white supremacy in public schooling and social life has created a highly segregated teaching force. Most U.S. teachers are white, middle-class, monolingual females who grew up in predominantly white communities. Teachers of color are dramatically under-represented in the teaching force, and children of color have very limited representations of their racial identity throughout their schooling experience. White teachers are thus currently over-represented in public schools, often with little experience engaging in and among communities of color, as they work with an increasingly racially diverse student body.

The central work of this course is to center race as a lens for understanding miseducation in American schooling. Through shared discussion, reading, and engagement in public school communities, students will confront the assumptions of whiteness in U.S. schooling and seek to unlearn socialized assumptions about race. Students will reflect on classroom and community learning, as well as personal experiences, to develop and apply strategies and action steps that promote equity in learning contexts.

Teaching reading has never been politically neutral because reading instruction, when it is done well, requires that we read something. Underlying this course is an assumption that the selection of what students read should consider the promotion of American ideals of liberty and justice for everyone. Together students think about the messages children's and young adult books send and how to select books that promote social justice. Students read children's and young adult books that include people from different racial groups, and books that open up ideas of gender and sexuality. Successful completion of this course requires a commitment to spend regular time working with youth.

Teaching about the past tells us where we came from and provides a narrative that communicates who "we" are. Using primary sources with K-12 students is often touted as one of the best ways to shape inclusive narratives while developing reading, writing, and critical thinking. And yet, primary sources are rarely used at the pre-college level. This class is designed to introduce students to using primary documents to help K-12 students understand alternative perspectives of the past. While many perspectives are marginalized in K-12 classrooms, few experience the silence that surrounds LGBTQ people. By using the Archive of Sexuality and Gender, students learn about LGBTQ history, discover valuable primary sources for use with K-12 students, and create a plan for using these sources with K-12 students. Successful completion of this course requires a commitment to spend regular time working with youth in a volunteer setting.

An experiential education course, Adventure Education: Mississippi River develops students' understanding of place through the examination of the Mississippi River through multiple lenses from history to literature, commerce to education, biology to culture. Students examine physical, biological, cultural, historical, and economic forces through time as they seek to understand how people today relate to the river, and natural and human history that preceded those relationships. This class provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to embark upon and support a human-powered voyage of the Mississippi River that involves scientific data collection and education of K-12 students along the river route.

This course focuses on the ways in which educators, politicians, and the public view the state of American schools. Broad philosophies of education guide an analysis of schools, which include historical lenses as well as the current literature on classroom reforms. This course contrasts central issues of schooling as seen from the "outside" political domain and the "inside" experience of students. In particular, the course addresses how issues of race and social as well as economic inequality surround current debates over the best way to improve schools in the 21st century. This course is intended both for prospective teachers and for students interested in examining critically the policies that shape one of the key institutions in American society. Required for the Education Studies minor and for admission to the MAT program.

Code
Knowledge, Identity, and Power

The central topic of this course is the ways teachers view learning, instruction, classroom organization, and motivation. This course takes a micro-analytical approach focusing on classroom interactions and how a teacher plans for a range of student interests, experiences, strengths, and needs. Students in the course consider 1) how the teacher inquiry cycle of planning, teaching, and reflecting supports teacher identity development and improves instruction, and 2) how the interactions between teachers and students, and amongst students, are located at the intersections of issues of knowledge, identity, and power.

Code
Knowledge, Identity, and Power

This is a required, school-based placement that students typically take in their senior year. Students are placed in classrooms with a teacher who is examining a "problem of practice". Students assist the teacher by gathering data related to the teacher's question(s), analyzing the data, and presenting what they find to the teacher. The School of Education builds off of decades of contacts with local districts to individually tailor placements. Students meet on a regular basis to discuss their placements and their work in the schools.

This school-based field experience accompanies the elementary and secondary curriculum and instruction courses. MAT students observe and participate in elementary and/or secondary classroom teaching and learning experiences.

This seminar involves weekly meetings in which students examine a range of issues emanating from school-based experiences. In addition, the course fulfills specific Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requirements for teacher preparation. Students hear selected speakers on professional topics related to sexual harassment, appropriate relationships and touch in school, school contract law, IEP/504 students, and child neglect/abuse.

Students focus on the continuous link among planning, instruction, and various forms of ongoing assessment. Students explore specific techniques for modifying instruction, various ways of documenting student growth, and using student artifacts as a source of assessment and shaping of instruction.

This 2.5-unit course focuses on learning and teaching in elementary classrooms and becoming an elementary teacher. Students consider the tension between giving full attention to each subject area, integrating across subject areas, and meeting students? developmental needs. Through an analysis of current research, theories of learning, and informed classroom practices, students prepare lesson and unit plans, teach, assess, and reflect on student learning. An integrated course structure is used; students study adjacent subject areas examining similarities and differences. In this course students study writing, reading, social science, mathematics, science, music, visual arts, physical education and health. The 1-unit version includes writing, reading, and social science or mathematics and science. A .5-unit version includes music, visual arts, physical education and health.

Students increase their understaning of systems perspectives through the critique of post-modern, socio-ecology, and emergence theory as they relate to the current state of intimate relationships. They also devise a viewpoint and a set of skills that enable them to offer therapeutic support to others engaged in intimate relationships.

Prerequisites
EDUC 635.

In this course students develop knowledge and a reflective stance toward teaching in the secondary content area. Focusing on understanding the various ways in which adolescents engage with content area learning, students plan, teach, assess and think reflectively about curriculum.

Prerequisites
EDUC 419, 420.

This course aims to prepare secondary teacher candidates to better understand adolescent experiences within and beyond school, using a variety of critical lenses and perspectives. The course emphasizes engagement with diverse student communities, and seeks to interrogate common assumptions surrounding student abilities, motivations, and literacies. Participants work with adolescents throughout the term, engage readings, complete case studies, and work toward curriculum and instruction that more consciously includes every learner.

This course provides students the opportunity to assume the role of an elementary/secondary teacher for a 15-week period during the Spring semester. Students work cooperatively with a selected mentor teacher, with supervisory support from the University. Pass/fail only.

Prerequisites
Must be taken concurrently with EDUC 615.

The central work of this course is to center race as a lens for understanding education and miseducation in American schooling. Students engage the ongoing process of confronting and unlearning socialized assumptions about race and how these manifest in classrooms and in their own racialized identities. Students reflect on classroom teaching and learning experiences to develop and apply strategies and action steps that promote racial equity in learning contexts, engaging the following questions: How do I define my racialized identity? What does it mean to name and unlearn socialized assumptions, beliefs, and practices about race? How does individual, interpersonal, and systemic racism manifest in classrooms and schools?

This masters project seminar uses reflective analysis to reconsider pedagogical dilemmas emerging from student teaching. In professional collaboration, students explore questions relating to culturally responsive teaching: What does it mean to be a culturally responsive and antiracist practitioner? How do my experiences and intersectional identities impact my cultural responsiveness? What actions can I take to interrogate my biases and social location and to contribute collaboratively to the ongoing work of equity? As a result of their exploration, students develop projects and consider implications and action steps for future practice.

This course is designed to supplement EDUC 647 and 648 and is intended for students who wish to accrue an additional 100 hours on their internship. Students may enroll in EDUC 649 up to a maximum of three times for a total of 300 additional internship hours. Interns develop assessment skills and the ability to design, utilize, and evaluate evidence-based interventions; they are expected to demonstrate professional conduct.

Prerequisites
EDUC 647 or 648 (or concurrent enrollment in one of these), EDUC 633 and 634, and for school counselors, EDUC 636.

Independent study is available to those students who wish to continue their learning in an area after completing the regularly offered courses in that area.

Independent study is available to those students who wish to continue their learning in an area after completing the regularly offered courses in that area.