The Business Leadership Seminar meets between 10-12 times per semester and offers students an opportunity to network with representatives from regional businesses and to learn about their companies' strategies and business practices. Guest speakers in the Business Leadership Seminar also discuss careers in various business fields and functional areas. Speakers present information on current leadership topics and practices and provide perspective on the theories and tools studied in class. Some seminars are devoted to the particular needs of a BLP class. Other seminar activities include, but are not limited to field trips, career development, community service and engagement with mentors.

Prerequisites
Admission to the Business Leadership Program.

The Business Leadership Seminar meets between 10-12 times per semester and offers students an opportunity to network with representatives from regional businesses and to learn about their companies' strategies and business practices. Guest speakers in the Business Leadership Seminar also discuss careers in various business fields and functional areas. Speakers present information on current leadership topics and practices and provide perspective on the theories and tools studied in class. Some seminars are devoted to the particular needs of a BLP class. Other seminar activities include, but are not limited to field trips, career development, community service and engagement with mentors.

Prerequisites
Admission to the Business Leadership Program.

This required core course in Accounting is split into two parts. Part I covers the essential topics in Financial Accounting and Part II covers the essential topics in Managerial Accounting.

In Financial Accounting, students examine the accounting principles and methods (GAAP) used in the preparation of the four principal financial statements, understand how transactions affect a firm?s financial statements, and analyze and interpret financial statements.

In Managerial Accounting, students examine how a manager uses accounting information within his or her organization. In this part of the course, students explore how a firm determines the cost per unit of the products and services it sells; how it formulates and decides strategy based on accounting numbers; and how it plans, controls, and evaluates its operations.

Prerequisites
Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. Students who have BUS 205 transfer credit may not take this course.

The natural environment is approaching a tipping point. Bold innovations are required to prevent further degradation. Because entrepreneurship combines innovative and forward thinking with action, it provides a strong framework for addressing environmental concerns. In this course, students will learn about environmental sustainability innovations around the world. Deep reading, field trips, speakers, thinking and meaningful discussion form the basis of learning. Active participation is required. Students will explore entrepreneurial paths to improving the environment, individually or in teams. Students are encouraged to engage students outside the class in their projects. Students will present their projects and, if desired, recruit team members and advisors at the Entrepreneurship Summit's Student Fair. Students will continue to develop their entrepreneurial ventures for the Puget Sound Shark Tank event. Students are encouraged to continue to pursue their ventures beyond the class. May not be used to satisfy a requirement in the Business major or minor.

Health allows people to pursue productive lives, yet many do not have good health or a reasonable path to good health. Innovative thinking and entrepreneurial action can create solutions. In this course, students learn about health and its precursors, from fitness to social services to urban revitalization. They learn to think entrepreneurially to develop innovative paths to health. Students learn how business models can be used to test and develop ideas. Students learn to put their ideas into action through lean start and business planning. Students pitch their ideas to an alumni-led panel at the end of the term.

This course is a primer in sound personal financial management. Students are introduced to the financial challenges that occur over a life-time: cash budgeting, credit management, debt management, personal income taxes, evaluating mortgages and installment loans, investing in the financial markets, and planning for retirement. In addition, current articles related to personal finance topics are analyzed and discussed. May not be used to satisfy a requirement in the business major or minor.

Prerequisites
Students who have BUS 300 transfer credit may not take this course.

The Business Leadership Seminar meets between 10-12 times per semester and offers students an opportunity to network with representatives from regional businesses and to learn about their companies' strategies and business practices. Guest speakers in the Business Leadership Seminar also discuss careers in various business fields and functional areas. Speakers present information on current leadership topics and practices and provide perspective on the theories and tools studied in class. Some seminars are devoted to the particular needs of a BLP class. Other seminar activities include, but are not limited to field trips, career development, community service and engagement with mentors.

Prerequisites
Admission to the Business Leadership Program.

Expedition Management explores the theoretical basis of topics important to teams, such as group development and functioning, feedback, leadership, followership, coordination, accountability, planning, communication, conflict and funding. Specifically, this course uses outdoor expeditions as the focus of course assignments and discussion. Student-led expeditions provide the experiential learning context for assignments wherein they will experiment with application of theoretical knowledge, thus learning to ask relevant questions about the theories and exploring their applicability.

A broad introduction to the field of management including such topics as planning, motivation, group dynamics, decision-making, organizing, and group organizational change. The course includes case studies and group assignments.

Prerequisites
Students with transfer credit for BUS 305 may not enroll in this course.

This is a survey course designed to provide an overview of main concepts and theories in the field of marketing. The course introduces students to marketing concepts that are fundamental to the decision-making processes of marketing management. Students have ample opportunities to apply these concepts to problem situations and projects.

Prerequisites
ECON 101 or permission of instructor. All prerequisite courses must be C- or higher. Students with transfer credit for BUS 310 may not take this course.

This accounting course examines the creation and use of information to support the execution of strategy and evaluation of performance within organizations. Managerial accounting information plays a vital role in the planning and control functions. It is also used to motivate and direct behavior. Topics include cost concepts, systems design, cost behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, variable costing, profit planning, and strategic performance measurement and evaluation. The course also examines the concept of shared value and sustainability reporting.

Prerequisites
BUS 205 with C- or higher.

This course introduces students to fundamental issues in both corporate financial management and investment management. Students learn one of the most fundamental principles in corporate and personal finance: the time value of money. Students are introduced to the basic features of stocks and bonds and how they are priced. Students work with information reported in the financial press on such items as bonds, equity, interest rates, and foreign exchange rates. They learn how to identify the relevant cash flows for a proposed investment, evaluate that investment, and use financial information to estimate the required rate of return. Students examine the relationship between risk and return and the implication of diversification.

Prerequisites
BUS 205, MATH 160 or 260, and ECON 101. All prerequisite courses must be C- or higher.

Students in this course prepare a sell-side equity research report to present in the Chartered Financial Analyst Institute's Investment Research Challenge. Students learn current best practices in equity analysis, including financial statement analysis applications and equity valuation models. May not be used to satisfy a requirement in the business major or minor.

Prerequisites
Permission of the instructor.

Corporations are undeniably influential actors in modern society, through the creation of goods, services, and jobs. They also have tremendous resources at their disposal. Many factors influence how and in what manner those resources are used, including the internal decision-making processes of the organization, fiduciary duties of the organization's principals, the statutory and regulatory environment, and stakeholder interests and influences. To the extent that corporations step outside of their ostensibly traditional role to merely maximize shareholder returns, and they dedicate at least a portion of their resources to the betterment of issues of societal concern, they are engaging in some form of corporate social responsibility (CSR). This course examines questions about CSR: What is it? Who or what may practice it? What are the factors that create tensions concerning the allocation of business resources? What does our law require of organizations with respect to fiduciary duties, the allocation of their resources, and societal expectations? Should organizations have legal obligations to engage in CSR? Students will examine these questions from a legal perspective.

This course examines legal and public policy issues arising in the fashion industry. These issues include intellectual property concerns (e.g., counterfeit, piracy), various other statutory and regulatory concerns, freedom of expression and its limits, and its negative externalities (e.g., environmental, human rights). We focus on legal categories most germane to these broad perspectives, including intellectual property law, employment law, environmental law, contracts, and constitutional law. This is a discussion-based course, requiring active student participation. Prior coursework in law or legal studies is recommended.

This course introduces students to the external constraints that society places on business activity and behavior. The most obvious are those constraints imposed by law in its various forms: case law from courts, statutory law from legislatures, and regulations from government agencies. However, in addition to these formal systems there are the informal, but extremely powerful constraints imposed by generally accepted moral beliefs and norms of ethical behavior. In this course students explore the relationship between legal and ethical standards to critically analyze and evaluate the behavior of business owners, managers, and employees.

Prerequisites
Second year standing or above. Students with transfer credit for BUS 340 may not take this course.

This course is designed to introduce students to the three stages of the legal educational experience: pre-law school and law school, post-law school careers, and the legal environment as a whole. Students understand the purpose and procedure of the LSAT, learn to plan critically for law school and subsequent careers, develop basic electronic legal research skills, and gain exposure to real legal fields. Students spend as much time working on this course outside of the classroom as inside it. The course emphasizes inter-related research activities and culminates in a major research paper.

Prerequisites
Junior or Senior standing

As corporations grow in size and influence, their impact on both social wellbeing and the natural environment has increased. Understanding interactions between corporations and the social and natural environments plays a large and growing role in effective management. This course provides an overview of the opportunities and challenges that established US businesses face regarding sustainable business. Students investigate corporations' ethical, regulatory, and financial interests in relation to the social and environmental values of the communities in which they operate. Students are expected to master key concepts related to sustainable business and to develop the ability to think critically about sustainable topics.

The base of the pyramid (BOP) refers to the billions of people living on very low incomes ($2-4 per day). Currently, various approaches exist as to how best to align business activity with the needs and potential of this segment of the global population. Those at the BOP can be seen as a large untapped market of demanding consumers, as creative entrepreneurs, as business partners, and as innovators. This course examines the various BOP perspectives to need satisfaction, poverty alleviation, and economic growth through business activity. The focus is on emerging business models that address individual and social needs in an innovative, profitable, sustainable, and socially-responsible manner. This course integrates concepts of development economics, international business, and strategy. Cross-listed as BUS/IPE 361.

Prerequisites
Junior or Senior standing

This course develops understandings of the dynamics and consequences of power differentials, inequalities, and divisions among cultural groups through the lens of criminal and civil law in US state and federal law. In both criminal and civil contexts, students examine the feasibility of legal pl uralism in three types of cases: intra-cultural, inter-cultural, and no-longer accepted cultural practices in an intra-cultural event. In the criminal context, students consider criminalization of culturally appropriate acts of non-mainstream cultural communities, the "cultural defense," and the role of law as an instrument of tolerance or tyranny. In the civil context, students examine taboo language, reappropriation or reclaiming of words, and law. Students examine law as a cultural artifact, including who it favors and who it silences or punishes, in tandem with its production of knowledge related to "right and wrong." This course promotes critical engagement with the nature of law, the role of the state and its police powers to regulate disputes between diverse groups, and institutionalized power. This is a seminar-based course, requiring active student participation. Students learn to discuss cultural differences in the legal context and consider their own cultural perspectives vis-a-vis "the law." Satisfies the Knowledge, Identity and Power graduation requirement.

Prerequisites
BUS 340 or any university level course in US state and/or federal government, law, or legal studies. All prerequisite courses must be C- or higher.
Code
Knowledge, Identity, and Power

This course introduces students to the most important theories that guide the field of international business strategy, and to key concepts and models related to the formulation and implementation of global strategy. The course provides students with analytical and planning tools for adapting a company's business model to global markets, specifically: assessing opportunities and risks in the global environment; identifying current and potential positioning spaces within a competitive environment; and for developing strategies that suit different organizational, sectorial, and geographical contexts. The course also explores the interplay between organizational stakeholders, including trade-offs between financial and market goals and the ethical and social values of organizations (i.e., balancing economic and non-economic objectives). Finally, global strategic management requires moving beyond analysis into the realm of strategic action. Knowing how to execute the selected strategy is essential to success. The course addresses the various combinations of systems (e.g., information, control, reward, etc.), organization structures, and people necessary to execute a strategy that is internally cohesive. Thus, students explore the relationships between global strategy and functional elements as they proceed through the course.

Prerequisites
BUS 305, 310, and junior standing or permission of instructor. All prerequisite courses must be C- or higher.

Arts organizations and artists face many challenges that could benefit from an entrepreneurial mindset. Entrepreneurial thinking requires focusing primarily on finding the right questions rather than finding the right answers. In this course, students develop an entrepreneurial mindset by focusing on an issue in a local arts organization, identifying the concepts that help them understand the issue, de-constructing and re-constructing their knowledge, and creating a feasibility study that tests their potential solution against reality. Students work to develop solutions that local organizations and artists are truly interested in implementing: The classroom learning directly benefits the arts. Topics covered in this course include entrepreneurship, the entrepreneurial mindset, questioning, interviewing and analysis, research, feasibility studies, and presenting findings. These topics are covered through readings, interaction with community arts organizations and artists, class activities and discussion, and students' hard work.

This course provides students with an introduction to the art and science of the leadership process. It is not limited to business leadership. Topics include organizational culture and climate, motivation, performance, power, tactics, ethics and values, personality traits, and intelligence. Students develop skills necessary to effectively analyze historical, contemporary, and even fictional leadership case studies. A primary aim is to help prepare students to meet the challenges of "life's leadership situations."

Prerequisites
BUS 305 (or 320) with C- or higher, or permission of instructor.

This course provides students the opportunity to enrich and apply their business knowledge in a consultative manner. Students learn to work with a variety of stakeholders and in a team environment. Pass/fail grading only.

Prerequisites
Concurrent enrollment in BUS 395.

In this practicum course, students apply theory and skills from BUS 394 in consulting work on a specific project. Pass/fail grading only.

Prerequisites
Concurrent enrollment in BUS 394 and instructor permission.

The Business Leadership Seminar meets between 10-12 times per semester and offers students an opportunity to network with representatives from regional businesses and to learn about their companies' strategies and business practices. Guest speakers in the Business Leadership Seminar also discuss careers in various business fields and functional areas. Speakers present information on current leadership topics and practices and provide perspective on the theories and tools studied in class. Some seminars are devoted to the particular needs of a BLP class. Other seminar activities include, but are not limited to field trips, career development, community service and engagement with mentors.

Prerequisites
Admission to the Business Leadership Program.

Marketing research is the common currency in modern business practices as business and marketing decisions rely on research to make informed choices. This course helps students: explore the critical role of marketing research in business; learn the language of marketing research; learn how to design and implement a research plan using key marketing research techniques (e.g., surveys, experiments, focus groups); analyze and interpret marketing research data; and report the results of marketing research. Students develop skills in research design, data collection, statistical data analysis, and communication of results through hands-on experience.

Prerequisites
BUS 310 and MATH 160 with C- or higher.

This course is concerned with understanding the psychology of consumer behaviors by focusing on the factors that affect the consumers' pre-purchase, purchase, and post-purchase processes. An in-depth analysis of the components of the consumer decision making process is presented in order to illustrate and integrate theoretical and empirical knowledge from a variety of perspectives. Emphasis is placed upon the evaluation of the relevance of such data and the application of what is learned in the classroom to the solution of real world marketing problems.

Prerequisites
BUS 310 or BUS 335 and MATH 160. All prerequisite courses must be C- or higher.

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of integrated marketing communications (IMC), which includes communication tools such as advertising, promotion, sales, and public relations, among others. The development of an IMC strategy requires an understanding of the overall marketing process, consumer behavior, and communications theory.

Prerequisites
BUS 310 with a grade of C- or higher.

The course expands students? knowledge and understanding of financial reporting and analysis by examining key questions of economic significance within the context of real companies and their reported financial information. The course includes analysis of U.S. companies that follow U.S. GAAP and global companies that use International Financial Reporting Standards. The underlying objective of financial analysis is to measure and compare risk and return characteristics of alternative investments when making investment and credit decisions. The course culminates with a substantial research project of a publicly traded company and a presentation.

Prerequisites
BUS 205

This course introduces students to major sectors of the financial markets, focusing on the money market, the primary market, the capital markets for debt, and the secondary markets for equity. The qualitative aspects of these markets are stressed, including their legal and economic frameworks.

Prerequisites
BUS 315 with C- or higher.

This course is designed to introduce students to quantitative techniques for managing investment assets. These techniques are illustrated through the development of three main topics: portfolio theory, fixed-income portfolio management, and option valuation. Economic factors affecting investment management, particularly efficient markets concepts, are stressed. Satisfies the senior research seminar requirement for business majors.

Prerequisites
BUS 205, 305, 310, 315, 340, one upper-division finance or accounting elective (excluding BUS 300), and senior standing unless waived or with permission of instructor. All prerequisite courses must be C- or higher.

Corporate finance is concerned with a corporation's acquisition and allocation of capital. Students apply more advanced concepts in corporate finance in a decision making context. Valuation is discussed as a unifying theme. This includes such issues as how to value a firm that is not publicly traded, how to value a potential merger, and how to value an investment project. Students assess how the firm's capital structure or its dividend policy might impact firm value. Students examine the valuation of investment projects and the valuation of a firm that is not publicly traded. Students study the underlying factors that impact the value of a financial option. The role of mergers and acquisitions in the growth of a firm is considered, as well as the impact of these deals on the shareholders of both the acquiring and acquired firms. Course materials include decision oriented cases and readings from professional journals.

Prerequisites
BUS 315 with C- or higher.

This course begins with a macroeconomic perspective and introduces students to international financial markets. Students examine the economic and governmental factors that influence exchange rates and study currency derivatives which are commonly traded to profit from or hedge against expected changes in foreign currencies. The perspective is then microeconomic. Students examine financial issues faced by managers of firms that are engaged in international business. These include: the measurement and management of exchange rate risk, multinational capital budgeting, and the assessment of both domestic and foreign sources of funds to finance long-term projects. Current issues in the international market and real-life problems in decision oriented cases are analyzed.

Prerequisites
BUS 315 or permission of instructor. All prerequisite courses must be C- or higher.

This course introduces approaches to the valuation of public and private equity, including free cash flow, residual income, economic profit, and relative valuation models. Critical analysis of financial statements is highlighted, and applications to real-world companies is stressed. Course content is informed by the Chartered Financial Analyst curriculum. Students complete a sell-side equity research report on a public company. Course is recommended for students competing in the CFA Investment Research Challenge and for students managing the Puget Sound student managed fund.

Prerequisites
BUS 205 and BUS 315. Prerequisite courses must be C- or higher.

This course introduces the design, implementation, and assessment of financial-asset portfolios. The main focus of the course is the active management of long-only equity portfolios. Relevant behavioral issues are considered. Course content is informed by the curriculum for the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation. Students taking Portfolio Management are eligible to manage the university's student investment fund.

Prerequisites
BUS 205 and BUS 315. Prerequisite courses must be C- or higher.

In this highly experiential course, students learn to generate new venture ideas and evaluate their viability. Lean start-up and business planning methodologies are utilized. Students develop creative problem solving, research, analytical and presentation skills. Students deepen their understanding of entrepreneurship and build their self-efficacy through reading, writing, experimenting and job shadowing. The in-depth job shadow results in the creation of a short documentary film.

Prerequisites
BUS 305 and 310.

This course explores how people and organizations can innovate to fulfill our social and environmental needs efficiently and effectively. Using innovative business models as the foundation, each student selects a social sector to study throughout the term on the local, nationsl, and international levels. Research includes reading articles, examination of financial data, and interviews. A series of research papers results in in-depth knowledge of the chosen sector. Knowledge is shared through public displays and presentations. Insights into how to solve difficult social and environmental problems will be gained through the research and the course. Additionally, the class reflects one social issue and enacts tangible solutions to this issue through the practicum, enabling students to participate in hands-on social entrepreneurship.

Prerequisites
BUS 205 and either BUS 305 or 320. All prerequisite courses must be C- or higher.

This course examines how individuals behave in and around organizations and how organizations themselves behave. Every day, individuals share time with others and operate within organizations. When people understand the behavior of individuals and organizations in their lives, they can better establish expectations, operate efficiently, and achieve goals. This class examines concepts and develops perspectives that help students effectively manage individuals and organizations. At the level of the individual, students learn about self-presentation, career planning, giving and receiving, feedback, personality, decision making, resilience, and creating success. At the level of the organization, students learn about teamwork, structure, culture, identity, change, resistance to change, and overcoming resistance to change. In addition, Organizational Behavior challenges students to develop skills in writing, presentation, and working in groups.

Prerequisites
BUS 305 with C- or higher, or permission of instructor.

Supply chain management encompasses the planning and management of all activities involved in sourcing and procurement, conversion, and all logistics management activities. Importantly, it also includes coordination and collaboration with channel partners, which can be suppliers, intermediaries, third party service providers, and customers. In essence, supply chain management integrates supply and demand management within and across companies. This course prepares the students to manage modern supply chains, both domestically and globally.

Prerequisites
BUS 205, and 305 or permission of instructor. All prerequisite courses must be C- or higher.

This course introduces students to the business environments and practices of East and South East Asia and may focus on specific countries of the region. The countries of this region are viable trading partners and destinations for foreign direct investment, and the course considers pertinent historical, cultural, macro-economic and political factors that impact business activity in the region. The course focuses on business opportunity and risk assessment, and introduces students to appropriate managerial, organizational, and strategic planning skills and methods for successfully doing and growing business in the region. The course relies on various teaching methods, including lectures, readings, case studies, class discussions, videos, independent research, and guest presentations.

Prerequisites
BUS 305 or 310 and Junior standing, or permission of the instructor. All prerequisite courses must be C- or higher.

This course introduces students to the business environments and practices of Latin America. The countries of this region are viable trading partners and destinations for foreign direct investment, and the course considers pertinent historical, cultural, macro-economic and political factors that impact business activity in the region. The course focuses on business opportunity and risk assessment, and introduces students to appropriate managerial, organizational, and strategic planning skills and methods for successfully doing and growing business in the region. The course relies on various teaching methods, including lectures, readings, case studies, class discussions, videos, independent research, and guest presentations. Satisfies the International Business elective requirement.

Prerequisites
BUS 305 or 310 and Junior standing, or permission of the instructor. All prerequisite courses must be C- or higher.

The class focuses on two primary forms of non-litigious dispute resolution: negotiation and mediation. Students learn and develop the substantive, procedural, and communication skills necessary to utilize these models 'successfully,' both personally and professionally.

Prerequisites
BUS 340 with C- or higher, and junior or senior standing.

This course introduces students to the business environments and practices of India and South Asia. The countries of this region are viable trading partners and destinations for foreign direct investment, and the course considers pertinent historical, cultural, macro-economic and political factors that impact business activity in the region. The course focuses on business opportunity and risk assessment, and introduces students to appropriate managerial, organizational, and strategic planning skills and methods for successfully doing and growing business in the region. The course relies on various teaching methods, including lectures, readings, case studies, class discussions, videos, independent research, and guest presentations.

Prerequisites
BUS 305 or 310 and junior standing, or permission of instructor. All prerequisite courses must be C- or higher.

This course introduces students to the business environments and practices of Europe. The countries of this region are viable trading partners and destinations for foreign direct investment, and the course considers pertinent historical, cultural, macro-economic and political factors that impact business activity in the region. The course focuses on business opportunity and risk assessment, and introduces students to appropriate managerial, organizational, and strategic planning skills and methods for successfully doing and growing business in the region. The course relies on various teaching methods, including lectures, readings, case studies, class discussions, videos, independent research, and guest presentations. Satisfies the International Business elective requirement.

Prerequisites
BUS 305 or 310 and Junior standing, or permission of the instructor. All prerequisite courses must be C- or higher.

This course discusses and analyzes historical and current legal issues shaping amateur and professional sports in the United States. For clarification, the "amateur" sport discussion is largely limited to Division I inter-collegiate athletics and "professional sports" focuses on sports played in exchange for compensation in the United States. We undertake this analysis to understand the legal aspects of what is, often, the "business of sports". We recognize, at all times, that though this course is grounded in sports, its true base is traditional areas of law including, but not limited to: employment, contract, tort, labor, intellectual property, and criminal law. This class requires a major, independent research project.

Prerequisites
BUS 205, BUS 305 (or 320), BUS 310 (or 335), BUS 315, BUS 340, and senior standing or instructor permission. All prerequisite courses must be C- or higher.

This class examines domestic and international environmental law and natural resource law to better understand how those laws relate to businesses in the United States and internationally. Students consider issues related to environmental and natural resource legislation and regulation. These issues include the tension between business and the environment, sustainability, the goals of environmental regulation, the problems of monitoring and enforcement, and the roles of science and risk assessment, including valuation of environmental injuries and environmental benefits. Students use case method studies, statutes, and legal cases to explore these concepts in contemporary situations. Students are responsible for substantial class leadership responsibilities including leading discussions and substantively contributing to each class session. Students identify suitable topics for exploration, formulate research questions, conduct independent research, write a substantial research paper, and present their work to the class.

Prerequisites
BUS 205, 305, 310, 315, 340, and senior standing or permission of instructor. All prerequisite courses must be C- or higher.

This course focuses on how organizations can achieve a sustainable competitive advantage. Strategic management involves a foundation of research and analysis of an organization's internal and external environments, followed by the identification of strategic choices, and the development and implementation of strategic plans. A resource-based view of the firm provides the theoretical underpinning for case analysis and the strategic consulting projects. Students work in small consulting teams with local organizations to develop successful strategies in these projects. Satisfies the Senior Research Seminar requirement for the business majors.

Prerequisites
BUS 205, BUS 305 (or 320), BUS 310 (or 335), BUS 315, BUS 340, and one business elective (excluding BUS 300 and 344; CONN 387, 490, and 478), and senior standing; or permission of instructor. All prerequisite courses must be C- or higher.

This is a senior research course in leadership that builds upon the foundational course, "Paradigms of Leadership" (BUS 385). Its overarching theme is that astute business leaders are liberally educated, able to comprehend and benefit from the interconnectivity of business leadership and the liberal arts. This cross-disciplinary course culminates with a substantial research paper and presentation.

Prerequisites
BUS 385 and senior standing or permission of instructor. All prerequisite courses must be C- or higher.

This seminar is organized around topics that reflect the particular field of research or expertise of the instructor. Each offering is on a unique topic. Some sections satisfy the International Business elective requirement. Multiple sections of BUS 493, covering different topics, may be applied to the major.

An independent study allows a student to pursue a specific topic not covered in existing courses, under the supervision of a faculty member. A written proposal must be submitted to and accepted by the faculty independent study advisor. No more than one independent study may be applied toward a specific major or minor in business.

Prerequisites
Junior or Senior class standing.

Research under the close supervision of a faculty member on a topic agreed upon. Application and proposal to be submitted to the department chair and faculty research advisor. Recommended for majors prior to the senior research semester.

Prerequisites
Junior or Senior class standing.

Students who enroll in this course work with a faculty member in the School of Business and Leadership to develop an individualized learning plan that connects the actual internship site experience to study in the major. The learning plan will include required reading and writing assignments, as well as a culminating project or paper.

Prerequisites
Approval of tutorial instructor and the internship coordinator.