This course uses literary works to explore the art, culture, and society of Asia. Regional focuses may include East Asia, South Asia, or Southeast Asia. Genres under study may include fiction, poetry, drama, essays, and autobiography. Themes and assigned texts vary by instructor.

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Artistic Approaches

The cultures that have occupied modern-day China have left incredibly long and varied written histories. Among these histories accounts of the strange and anomalous are often overlooked, and yet they provide a wealth of critical information about culture in a broad sense. This class uses analysis of stories of ghosts, demons, fox-spirits and other anomalies from over 2000 years of Chinese literary history as a way to understand Chinese fiction generally, but also to shed light on the ways in which authors approached issues of identity, the other, society, and conceptions of the transcendent.

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Humanistic Approaches

Classical Chinese literature has contributed the inspiration and source materials for a host of modern cultural products. This course is designed to help students develop an awareness of the importance, uses and the significance of classical Chinese literature in modern cultural production. In this course, students study classical texts in English translation and their modern and contemporary film adaptations. In the process, students try to understand what about the original classics appeals to modern cultural producers, and what cultural, social, and political purposes they might serve in different modern contexts. The goals of this course are 1) to develop an overall understanding of major Chinese literary genres; 2) to examine why traditional Chinese literature still matters to us today and why literary works from the past have been used by the West and recycled in our modern cultural production; 3) to demonstrate critical thinking through written and oral expression; 4) to retrieve and use written information critically and effectively.

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Humanistic Approaches

One of the most prominent themes of early Japanese literature is a longing for and deep appreciation of beauty coupled with a poignant understanding of its perishability. In this class students read classical Japanese literature from the mid-eighth to the mid-eighteenth century and analyze the works in the context of these major themes of desire and death. In such varied works as The Tale of the Genjii, Ch?shingura (the story of the 47 ronin), and the memoirs of Medieval recluses, students explore the different shapes that desire and death take, and how the treatment of these themes changes alongside developments in Japanese culture.

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Humanistic Approaches

This course is a survey of modern Japanese literature with an emphasis on Japanese writers in the late nineteenth through the twentieth centuries who struggled with questions of identity. The course is organized chronologically and focuses on some of the major authors of the modern period, including Natsume S?seki, Tanizaki Jun'ichiro, Kawabata Yasunari, and Mishima Yukio.

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Humanistic Approaches

Chinese-language films produced in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the Chinese diaspora have been global powerhouses, winning major international awards and capturing remarkable box office receipts. With a long and intricate history, Chinese-language cinema is not only one of the most important forms of cultural productions within the region, it also has assumed an increasingly important role in the global cultural industry and imagination. This course introduces students to the broad historical scope of the Chinese-language cinema, covering three major traditions of Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. The films examined in the course powerfully capture the ethos of their times, from the early twentieth century to the present. They address important issues such as gender, modernity, national identity, ethnicity, and globalization. While these issues define the contemporary societies under study, they also condition the making of the films.

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Humanistic Approaches

The examination of the self and its representation that has dominated Japanese literature since the Meiji period (1868-1912) took on a new urgency and tone in Japan's post-war period, with many authors exploring identities that challenged the established order. For some, that challenge was expressed through transgression and violence; for others, it was embodied in characters who lived outside of the boundaries of social acceptance. During a post-war period of general economic prosperity in which the Japanese government has famously taken pride in being a "homogenous" society, the country's contemporary literature is consistently and remarkably populated by characters who live on the margins of that homogenous identity. This course will explore the dominant themes of the most important modern and post-modern authors of Japan, including ?e Kenzaburo, Murakami Haruki, Murakami Ry?, and Yoshimoto Banana, with particular emphasis on these marginalized characters and what they say about the "center" and the self. The goals of this course are 1) to become familiar with the most critically acclaimed literary voices of the post-war period; 2) to identify dominant themes in the literature of the period and examine what they say about what it means to be human; 3) to develop skills in critical reading, thinking and writing.

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Humanistic Approaches

Since antiquity, many cultures have turned to retribution as a means of restoring justice. Stories about getting even through revenge abound in both highbrow and popular Chinese literature. The themes of revenge and retribution have lent themselves effectively to various literary genres throughout Chinese history, from historical biographies and classical tales to vernacular short stories and plays, extending all the way into twentieth-century ballet and film. Literature has served as an important site of inquiry into the morality and mechanisms of revenge and retribution, sometimes offering conclusions that are a good deal more ambiguous than legal and philosophical discourses about the same question. This course works through four organizing themes: The Collective (assassination and self-destruction for a larger cause); The Individual (revenge and redemption in interpersonal relationships); Modern Man and Nation Building (from the Republican Period to Socialism); and Transnational Interpretations of "China's Hamlet." By the end of the course students should be able to identify the relevant genres, produce effective oral and written analyses of the material, and critically and cogently reflect on how Chinese conceptions of revenge and retribution might help them think through their own beliefs about revenge, justice, forgiveness, and identity.

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Humanistic Approaches

Introduction to the fundamentals of Mandarin Chinese in four basic skills: comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is on the development of communicative skills, in both oral and written language.

Prerequisites
Students who have CHIN 1XX First Qtr Chinese transfer credit may not take this course.
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Foreign Language

Introduction to the fundamentals of Mandarin Chinese in four basic skills: comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is on the development of communicative skills, in both oral and written language.

Prerequisites
CHIN 101 or permission of the instructor.
Code
Foreign Language

Development of oral and written fluency at the intermediate level. Emphasis is on the acquisition of basic sentence patterns and their application in day-to-day situations. Oral and written assignments on a variety of topics are included to enhance students' control of grammatical forms and communicative skills.

Code
Foreign Language

Development of oral and written fluency at the intermediate level. Emphasis is on the acquisition of basic sentence patterns and their application in day-to-day situations. Oral and written assignments on a variety of topics are included to enhance students' control of grammatical forms and communicative skills.

Prerequisites
CHIN 201 or permission of the instructor.
Code
Foreign Language

Chinese Corner is an opportunity for Chinese language learners of intermediate level or above to practice Mandarin on a weekly basis in a non-classroom setting. The goals of this activity course are for learners to increase their oral communication skills and comprehension, get help with homework, acquire a deeper understanding of Chinese culture, and interact with other speakers.

Prerequisites
CHIN 202 or equivalent.

This course focuses on patterns, translation, and the use of linguistic structures to articulate ideas in public speaking and composition writing. Course material includes a multimedia component and a grammar review. Students who have completed 300-level courses may enroll for credit.

Prerequisites
CHIN 202 or permission of instructor.
Code
Foreign Language

This course aims to develop increased accuracy in communication skills utilizing Mandarin Chinese in a cultural context. Emphasis is on oral fluency, comprehension, and the language used in daily life. Course material includes study of films and songs with class activities and discussions geared toward further understanding of the society in which the language is spoken.

Prerequisites
CHIN 202 or permission of instructor. Students who have completed 300-level courses may enroll for credit.
Code
Foreign Language

This course integrates linguistic functions and structures with culture via listening, speaking, reading, and writing activities. Course materials are derived from contemporary Chinese film, TV plays, and other media sources. The course focuses on oral fluency in Chinese through class discussions utilizing topics presented in the original media materials and their illustration of language in a cultural context.

Prerequisites
CHIN 202 or permission of instructor. Students who have completed 300-level courses may enroll for credit.
Code
Foreign Language

Chinese language studies with specific concerns on issues related to popular culture as well as contemporary social and political conditions. This course includes a grammar review and a multimedia component, and aims for development of oral and written fluency at the advanced level with emphasis on reading, writing, and group discussion.

Prerequisites
CHIN 202 or permission of instructor.

Chinese language studies in the world of business and media. Areas of exploration include China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and their transpacific Chinese-speaking network. This course includes a grammar review and a multimedia component, and aims for development of oral and written fluency at the advanced level with emphasis on reading, writing, and group discussion.

Prerequisites
CHIN 202 or permission of instructor.

Chinese language studies focusing on classical and contemporary literary texts that are available in either traditional or electronic format. This course includes a grammar review and a multimedia component, and aims for development of oral and written fluency at the advanced level with emphasis on reading, writing and group discussion.

Prerequisites
CHIN 202 or permission of instructor.

This Chinese language studies course explores traditional values and contemporary issues via films produced in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. The course includes a grammar review and a multimedia component, and aims for development of oral and written fluency at the advanced level with emphasis on reading, writing, and group discussions.

Prerequisites
CHIN 202 or permission of instructor.

Chinese language studies explores topics related to food in Chinese culture. This course includes a grammar review and a multimedia component, and aims for development of oral and written fluency at the advanced level with emphasis on reading, writing, and group discussion.

Prerequisites
CHIN 260 recommended.

In this modern Chinese language course students improve reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills through an exploration of sources related to Chinese thought. Sources are drawn from Confucian, Daoist, and Buddhist texts as well as those produced by modern political and intellectual movements. This course includes a grammar review and a multimedia component, and aims for delveopment of oral and written fluency at the advanced level with emphasis on reading, writing, and group discussion.

Prerequisites
CHIN 230, 250, or 260, or permission of instructor.

Independent study is available to those students who wish to continue their learning in an area after completing the regularly offered courses in that area.

Introduction and development of the four basic language skills: comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Acquisition of two native scripts, Hiragana and Katakana, is emphasized in 101. Emphasis is on basic sentence patterns with basic vocabulary and development of communicative skills in everyday situations.

Prerequisites
Students who have JAPN 1XX First Qtr Japanese transfer credit may not take this course.
Code
Foreign Language

Introduction and development of the four basic language skills: comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is on basic sentence patterns with basic vocabulary and development of communicative skills in everyday situations.

Prerequisites
JAPN 101 or permission of the instructor.
Code
Foreign Language

Development and practical communication skills by enhancement of oral and written skills at the intermediate level. Previously studied grammatical patterns are consolidated and expanded upon, while new ones are introduced.

Code
Foreign Language

Development and practical communication skills by enhancement of oral and written skills at the intermediate level. Previously studied grammatical patterns are consolidated and expanded upon, while new ones are introduced.

Prerequisites
JAPN 201 or permission of the instructor.
Code
Foreign Language

In this course, students develop an understanding of Kanji and Kanji-based vocabulary and its role in Japanese daily life. Special emphasis is on accuracy in Kanji usage in writing and reading. Calligraphy is used to improve Kanji stroke orders and formation. The course may include some grammar review.

Prerequisites
JAPN 201 or permission of the instructor.
Code
Foreign Language

This course examines popular culture and society through sources such as manga, animated films, and feature films. These form the basis for reading, writing, and discussion. Special emphasis is placed on speech levels, male/female speech, formal/informal speech levels, informal speech, and slang and regional dialects.

Prerequisites
JAPN 202.
Code
Foreign Language

This course serves those students who have completed JAPN 202 and wish to improve their skills in all areas: oral, aural, reading, and writing. Special emphasis is placed on listening and speaking skills. Class discussion, conversational exercises, reading materials, and writing assignments center on a variety of original Japanese materials which comment on recent social and cultural phenomenon.

Prerequisites
JAPN 202.
Code
Foreign Language

Previously studied grammatical patterns are consolidated and expanded upon, while new ones are introduced. Development of oral and written fluency, and reading at the third-year level. Lesson topics focus on current as well as traditional uses.

Prerequisites
JAPN 202 or permission of instructor.

Previously studied grammatical patterns are consolidated and expanded upon, while new ones are introduced. Development of oral and written fluency, and reading at the third-year level. Lesson topics focus on current as well as traditional uses.

Prerequisites
JAPN 301 or permission of the instructor.

This course is designed for students who wish to further improve their language skills in all areas: oral, aural, reading, and writing. The first half of the semester places special emphasis on writing and the second half of the semester on speaking, so that students will further develop their proficiency in these two areas as a preparation for advanced level courses. The course goal is to enable students to obtain intermediate to high intermediate level communication skills in both written and spoken Japanese. Students will be trained to write letters, messages, resumes, 2-4 pages long compositions, reports, speeches, and to carry on longer and more natural conversations and participate in group discussion in Japanese.

Prerequisites
JAPN 301 or equivalent.

In this course, students focus on strengthening their kanji-based vocabulary at intermediate and higher levels to improve reading and writing. Stroke order and formation are emphasized. Class discussion will improve speaking and listening skills and also may include grammar review.

Prerequisites
JAPN 202 or equivalent.

This course is designed to further advance high intermediate Japanese learners' listening skill and to improve their vocabulary, sentence patterns and expressions as well as deepen their understanding of Japanese culture. Students explore contemporary Japanese usage and culture through Japanese TV dramas including animations and everyday listening materials. Although the focus is on listening, exposure to authentic Japanese materials will enhance students' communicative competence in their four language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing).

Prerequisites
JAPN 311 with a minimum course grade of C- or equivalent.

This course is the pre-advanced Japanese language course. The focus of this course is on preparing students to be able to handle academic report writing and oral presentation in Japanese through Japanese geography and culture. Japan has 47 prefectures and is divided into 8 regions. Students will learn an approachable and wide-ranging survey of the geography and culture of each region of Japan as they examine authentic materials. This class is carefully designed for students to obtain the geographical setting of Japan, the way of life, and the nature of their society smoothly as if they are traveling across Japan.

Prerequisites
JAPN 311 with a minimum course grade of C- or equivalent.

Students strengthen all four skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking by using original Japanese materials that appear in both written form and as films. Students first read an original novel or short story, building vocabulary and kanji. Later they view the film made of the story, working on listening comprehension. Activities include weekly writing assignments on readings, kanji and vocabulary quizzes, class discussion of the books and films, and writing English subtitles for the movies.

Prerequisites
JAPN 302 or JAPN 311 or equivalent.

Students strengthen reading and writing skills by reading a wide variety of Japanese prose, including newspaper articles and editorials, and nonfiction and fiction. Activities include writing assignments and class discussion of the readings, and a significant final research paper and presentation. The final weeks of the class are devoted to peer review of completed work on the research paper, and student presentations of research.

Prerequisites
JAPN 302 or JAPN 311 or equivalent.

This course is designed to develop high intermediate level translation skills from English to Japanese. Students have an overview of the considerations that the translator should take into account when approaching texts. Particular attention is paid to understanding the sentence structural differences between English and Japanese, cross-cultural differences in stylistics, making the appropriate choice of words and phrases, and further advancing students' expressions in the Japanese language. Although the focus is on acquiring translation skills, exposure to authentic Japanese materials enhances students' communicative competence in their four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) as well as deepen their understanding of Japanese culture.

Prerequisites
JAPN 311 with a minimum course grade of C- or equivalent.

Research under the close supervision of a faculty member on a topic agreed upon. Application and proposal to be submitted to the department chair and faculty research advisor. Recommended for majors prior to the senior research semester.

Research under the close supervision of a faculty member on a topic agreed upon. Application and proposal to be submitted to the department chair and faculty research advisor. Recommended for majors prior to the senior research semester.