This course introduces selected monuments produced by the civilizations of the pagan ancient Mediterranean and the Near East, medieval Christian Europe, and the world of Islam, from ca. 3000 BCE to ca. 1300 CE. The course examines a wide range of material - from colossal monuments built for the powerful to humble objects used by commoners, from works of awesome religious significance to lighthearted artifacts of the secular realm - to understand the role art played in the various societies of the ancient world. Emphasis will be placed on how the monuments functioned within their cultural contexts and how they expressed political, social, and religious meanings. To facilitate the inquiry, the course also introduces terms and principal methods of art historical study.

Prerequisites
Students may not receive credit for both ARTH 275 and HON 206. Students who have ARTH 275 transfer credit may not take this course.
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Artistic Approaches

This class introduces students to artistic works created in Western Europe and the Americas from circa 1300 to the present. Students will learn to discuss how art communicates, while pursuing larger questions of meaning related to the social, cultural, and artistic context in which the works were created. While students will learn to identify stylistic characteristics, particular emphasis is given to how the works complement and/or reflect particular political, spiritual, scientific, or philosophical issues. Discussion and writings stress the interpretive methods of the discipline of art history.

Prerequisites
Students who have ARTH 276 transfer credit may not take this course.
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Artistic Approaches

This course is a survey of the major artistic traditions of Asia, primarily of China, India, and Japan, from prehistoric times to the turn of the twentieth century. It examines important monuments and emphasizes the interaction of art and society, specifically, how different artistic styles are tied to different intellectual beliefs, geographical locations, and other historical contexts. The course includes a field trip to the Seattle Asian Art Museum.

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Artistic Approaches

This course examines the origins and history of the discipline of art history and serves as an introduction to fundamental methods of art historical research (e.g., biographical, formalist, iconographic, sociological, feminist, etc.) approaches. The course, intended for prospective and recently declared majors, prepares students for more advanced courses in art history. This generally chronological seminar may also provide hands-on learning of museological and archival procedures, and offers students the opportunity to become acquainted with and to practice different types of art historical writing (e.g., ranging from catalog entry to book review). Students also have the opportunity to develop and refine their research skills through the completion of a substantial research project. Students present their work to the class both in formal and informal presentations throughout the term.

Prerequisites
Second-year students at Puget Sound or transfer students who have completed two Art History courses at a university.

This course introduces the arts of Mesoamerica and Mexico from 1200 BCE to the present. Architecture, sculpture, pottery, textiles, and painting of the pre-Columbian, Viceregal, and modern periods are examined with their ritual functions in mind, focusing on the political and religious contexts of the works. Style is analyzed throughout the course as a product of cultural intersection and transmission, reflecting ongoing adaptation and assimilation rather than the hegemonic expression of one particular culture. Readings and discussions on art and material culture from the 16th century to the present include the reception of "New World" images and objects by European and North American audiences, as well as a fundamental investigation of the power of art to create, confirm national and local identity, or reject views of other cultures. Counts toward Latin American Studies minor.

Prerequisites
Second year standing or above.
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Artistic Approaches

This course explores the emergence and development of fashion in the early modern and modern world. How have ideals of the male and female body evolved through history and how do these fashioned bodies inform upon concepts of gender? How did phenomena like fashion magazines, catwalk shows, brand-name logos, global supply chains, and celebrity endorsements develop, and what role did they play in fashioning gendered bodies? In what ways were fashionable consumers of eighteenth-century Edo and London, Paris and Suzhou alike, and in what ways did
they differ? Students will be introduced to the key fashion theories and methodologies from art history, gender studies, cultural history, and anthropology. Using this interdisciplinary approach, we study the relationship between fashion, gender and identity; as well as historical processes of urbanization, industrialization, modernity, and globalization. Class is taught through a combination of short lectures, class discussions of primary images and texts, film watching and discussions, and student presentations.

This course investigates women as creators, patrons, and subjects of art from the sixteenth through the twentieth centuries. We will study individual histories of female artists alongside some critical theories around gender, sexuality and representation, in order to explore the gendering of artistic practice and the practices of representing gendered subjects. The course explores questions like: How does gender change our understanding of art and the meanings associated with art? Did women?s artwork or commissions differ from those of men, and if so, in what ways? What were the range of meanings for woman as subject matter? What do these images tell us about women?s changing positions and roles in family and society? What different positions have women adopted in relation to representing, looking and being represented? The course approaches this history chronologically and thematically, covering themes like patronage, markets, portraiture, the craft-art separation, and modernism; and in order to widen our perspective and achieve broader conclusions, we will consider case studies of women as artists, patrons, and subjects in India, China, Japan and the Ottoman Empire. Class sessions will combine short lectures with in-depth discussions of readings and images, student presentations, and film viewings/discussions.

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Connections

This course explores the artistic trends in the West from 1900 to the present focusing on the relationship of artists and movements to historical and cultural events that shaped the period. Theoretical readings inform the study of painting, architecture, sculpture, photography, printmaking, installation and performance art from the modernism of the early twentieth century to current artistic movements.

Prerequisites
Second year standing or above.

This course offers an overview of works created throughout the Italian peninsula, from Naples to Genoa, and Venice to Rome from the thirteenth through the fifteenth century. In addition to the well-known artists who generally define the period (Giotto, Donatello, Botticelli) the course covers a variety of artists, media, and sites that broaden students' understanding of the early Renaissance, examining formal transformations within social, political, and religious contexts. Students focus particularly on how art was used in the civic structure of both republics and courts, and how individual patrons shaped the visual arts in Italy from the early fourteenth-century innovations of Giotto to the late fifteenth-century innovations of Leonardo and Michelangelo. In addition to understanding how visual images communicate by developing skills of formal analysis of art and architecture, students focus on the interpretation of how and what particular styles conveyed in society. Writing assignments include the critical analysis of art historical writing, analysis of style, and a research paper.

Prerequisites
Second year standing or above.

Islamic culture is truly global, encircling the planet from the Islamic Center of Tacoma, WA to the Kaaba in Mecca, to the myriad mosques of Xinjiang Province in China. The history of the Islamic world is equally vast, spanning over a millennium. This course focuses on the history of Islamic visual culture from the 7th through the 17th century and explores works of art in a variety of media (e.g. architecture and monumental decoration, book illuminations, ceramics, metal-works, textiles, etc.) both from the religious and the secular realms. Artworks are examined with particular attention to their original function, context, and intended audience, and are presented from a range of methodological perspectives. Topics of special interest include: formation of Islamic art; function and decoration of Islamic religious artifacts and architecture; development of regional styles; interactions of text and image; visual expressions of power and authority; reflections of gender; garden culture.

The civilization of ancient Greece has an important place in the formation of Western culture and in the development of Art History as a discipline. This course examines the art produced in Greece and the Greek world from the Early Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period (ca. 3000 BCE to 1st c. BCE), with particular emphasis on artistic production of the 8th through the 1st century BCE. Works of art are examined with particular attention to their original function, context, and intended audience, and are presented from a range of methodological perspectives. Topics of special interest include: gender and the body; images of women; power and visual propaganda; function and decoration of painted pots; narrative strategies; architecture and decoration of sanctuaries; votive statues; funerary monuments; art of the domestic sphere; the history of the study of Greek art.

This course introduces selected monuments of the Etruscan and Roman civilizations from ca. the 8th c. BCE to the 4th c. CE. Through careful analysis of artworks, the course traces the emergence, flourishing, and eventual disappearance of the Etruscan civilization in Northern Italy in the 8th-3rd centuries BCE and follows the spectacular development of the city-state of Rome into the vast Roman Empire dominating the Mediterranean and Western Europe. Works of art are examined with particular attention to their original function, context, and intended audience, and are presented from a range of methodological perspectives. Topics of special interest include: interactions between the Greek, Etruscan, and Roman artistic traditions; copying; imperial art and visual propaganda; images of women; art of the non-elite; material culture of urban amenities (e.g. baths, arenas); art in the domestic sphere; funerary monuments; development of Roman painting and mosaic styles; art of the provinces.

Prerequisites
Second year standing or above.

This course explores the artistic traditions of the Late Antique and Byzantine periods from the earliest surviving monuments of Christian art of the mid-3rd century to the monuments of the Late Byzantine Empire up to the fall of Constantinople in 1453. The course examines how the interactions between the Greco-Roman, Jewish, and Christian traditions produced the art of Late Antiquity and Byzantium, and accentuates the visual, social, and religious continuities and ruptures between these traditions. Works of art are examined with particular attention to their original function, context, and intended audience, and are presented from a range of methodological perspectives. Topics of special interest include: the formation of Christian art; images of power and authority; representations of gender; the function and decoration of liturgical spaces; icons, image theory, and the Iconoclastic controversy; depictions of the secular world.

This course introduces the art of Medieval Western Europe from the Period of Migrations through the Gothic Era (7-14th century.) A fundamental social and cultural transformation of Western Europe followed the end of the Roman Empire characterized by the increasing dominance of the Christian Church, the interaction of various cultural and ethnic groups, the development of feudalism, and the eventual renascence of the Western Roman Empire. The intermingling of the Germanic, Greco-Roman, Early Christian, and Byzantine pictorial traditions produced a distinct visual culture that developed separately from the artistic tradition of the Byzantine East. Works of art are examined with particular attention to their original function, context, and intended audience, and are presented from a range of methodological perspectives. Topics of special interest include: the role of relics and pilgrimage; the visual expression of imperial and monastic ideology; revival and rejection of the classical style; function and decoration of liturgical spaces; and the role of words and images in illuminated books.

The period between 1780 and the end of the nineteenth century is marked by myriad social changes and scientific innovations, from revolutions across Europe and the Americas, enlightenment thought, and increasing emphasis on human rights, to the innovation of photography, steel construction, and paint in tubes. This course studies how artists and architects responded to these developments, focusing particularly on the shift from academic works to the rise of modernism and the avant-garde.

Prerequisites
Second year standing or above.

This course is an introduction to the foundations of Chinese art from the Neolithic period to the present. It covers the arts of ceramics, bronze, jade, painting, calligraphy, sculpture, and architecture. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of art forms and the socio-political forces and intellectual discourses that shaped them. Each class combines lecture and discussion. The course includes two hands-on sessions of Chinese calligraphy and ink painting. Students who have received credit for ART 374 may not receive credit for ART 367.

Prerequisites
Students who have received credit for ART 374 may not receive credit for ART 367.

This course is a survey of the visual arts of Japan from the Neolithic period to modern times. The course also examines the social, political, and philosophical atmosphere that shaped these arts. Architecture, sculpture, ceramics, and decorative arts are discussed, but painting and woodblock print is emphasized in the later periods.

This course examines Chinese art in the socially and politically tumultuous twentieth century, which has witnessed the end of Imperial China, the founding of the Republic, the rise of the People's Republic, and the impact of the West throughout the period. The focus is on the art and society from the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) to the end of the century.

This course is an introduction to the major monuments and movements of Buddhist art in Asia, including China, Korea, Japan, Southeast Asia, and Tibet. Emphasis is placed on the interaction of different Buddhist concepts/schools and diverse visual forms that represented them. Issues of examination include the evolution of the Buddha's image from aniconic to iconic representation, the development of Buddhist iconography in relation to other religious iconography and secular imagery, the role of patronage, and the relationship of pilgrimage and art production. Each class combines lecture and discussion.

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the history and techniques of East Asian calligraphy as one of the supreme artistic accomplishments in China, Japan, and Korea. It combines the historical study of this art form with its hand-on practice as an art performance. Emphasis is put on the understanding of the multi-function of calligraphy in East Asian society.

In architecture, the concepts of "type" and "module" are often used to analyze the process of building (an idea, a structure, an argument). These ideas are particularly potent tools in getting at the deeper structures of "traditional Chinese architecture" in which both are pushed to brilliant and complex extremes.The course uses the route and history of the China's Grand Canal as a structure for exploring design achievements and intentions at both ends of this critically important man made waterway.

Prerequisites
Acceptance into the PacRim program.

This course explores the history of museums, collecting and theories and practice of contemporary curating. Student learn the history of different types of exhibitions of material culture--both art and artifacts and objects/displays of the natural world. The class includes visits to regional museums, proper handling of art and artifacts, and guest presentations by professionals in the field. Students study the politics and ethics of collecting and curating and for the final project, plan an exhibition.

This seminar is designed to allow in-depth examination of selected topics from the history of art. The course may focus on a region, time period, artistic movement or a single artist, yet it may also cover the thematic study of artworks from multiple regions or periods. The course explores relevant art historical research and methodologies on the selected topic. A different topic is chosen by faculty each time the course is offered. The different content of the course varies with the instructor and may have Ancient or Medieval European, Modern European, American, or Asian emphasis.

This semester-long course allows students to work with an art history professor on a project related to the history of art or visual culture. The work may include: the planning and implementing of an exhibition in Kittredge Gallery or another venue on campus; cataloging and researching works of art belonging to the Puget Sound art collection; art education or other initiatives that connect the community and visual arts on the Puget Sound campus. Students develop research and writing skills that aim to provide a context for artistic works and make them accessible to the public. This course is designed for second year students and above.

Prerequisites
One 200- or 300- level art history course at Puget Sound and permission of instructor.

The course is a reading and writing intensive seminar, required for all art history majors, which focuses on research methods and approaches in the field of art history. Students culminate their disciplinary studies with a substantial thesis/research paper. Open only to art history majors in the senior year of study.

Prerequisites
ARTH 294 and two additional Art History courses and the completion of at least one substantial research paper in Art History (at least 10 pages and approved by the Art History faculty).

Independent study is available to those students who wish to continue their learning in an area after completing the regularly offered courses in that area.

Prerequisites
Junior or Senior standing and at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

Independent study is available to those students who wish to continue their learning in an area after completing the regularly offered courses in that area.

Prerequisites
Junior or Senior standing and at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

This scheduled weekly interdisciplinary seminar provides the context to reflect on concrete experiences at an off-campus internship site and to link these experiences to academic study relating to the political, psychological, social, economic and intellectual forces that shape our views on work and its meaning. The aim is to integrate study in the liberal arts with issues and themes surrounding the pursuit of a creative, productive, and satisfying professional life. Students receive 1.0 unit of academic credit for the academic work that augments their concurrent internship fieldwork. This course is not applicable to the Upper-Division Graduation Requirement. Only 1.0 unit may be assigned to an individual internship and no more than 2.0 units of internship credit, or internship credit in combination with co-operative education credit, may be applied to an undergraduate degree.

Prerequisites
Junior or Senior standing and at least a 2.50 cumulative grade point average.

Visual Concepts examines the nature of drawing and 2-dimensional design as inter-related approaches to visual thinking. The purpose of this course is to introduce a shared visual language that heightens perceptual sensitivity, explores visual relationships, conveys ideas, and expresses sensory and psychological experiences. A primary focus of the class is learning to see more acutely. In order to hone perceptual skills, we will work from observation as well as explore abstract compositional problems. As a means of broadening expressive possibilities, a variety of subjects, materials, techniques, and methods will be explored. Throughout the semester students will engage in writing and sketching exercises as well as generate more sustained, involved projects.

Prerequisites
Students with transfer credit for ARTS 101 may not take this course.
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Artistic Approaches

This course is a comprehensive investigation of contemporary and traditional three-dimensional concepts and processes. Students develop a working understanding of the visual and conceptual vocabulary needed for making and critically assessing three-dimensional form. Projects are designed to provide each student the opportunity to fully develop an understanding and envisioning of space, the autonomous object, the effects of scale, and the relationship of the body to the built environment. The student gains experience in handling both plastic and rigid materials while employing additive and reductive forming practices. In addition to "making," students engage in research pertaining to the historical development of three-dimensional art and present findings through writing and oral presentation. Critiques also serve as a vehicle to help students learn to critically evaluate their work and that of their peers.

Code
Artistic Approaches

This course explores drawing and painting a means of seeing more acutely, examining cultural narratives, and experimenting with a range of materials. Technical skills are fused with conceptual inquiries and critical analysis. This course emphasizes the interplay between intellectual, expressive, and material aspects of the creative process as they relate to recording and relating visual relationships, expressing spatial and temporal phenomena, and critically engaging with art historical, contemporary, and personal issues and narratives relating to the figure and/or body. The course will begin with explorations of different drawing media and approaches and then shift to painting processes. Additionally, an examination of contemporary trends in art informs the themes and approaches explored in this course.

Prerequisites
ARTS 101

This course introduces students to significant developments and works in printmaking. Students are exposed to the craft and function of printmaking through exploring its historical foundation and contemporary applications. Printmaking's potential for visual communication is considered through readings, research, writing, creative projects, discussion, class presentations, studio and museum visits. Students have the opportunity to gain both hands-on experience with materials and build skills for analyzing art and print media.

Code
Artistic Approaches

This course presents students with the spectacular possibilities of functional ceramic vessels as formed on the wheel. Students start the course by learning the fundamentals of throwing. These basic skills provide the groundwork for the creation of more elaborate and complex forms as the course progresses. In tandem with these assignments, students also explore high temperature glaze formulation. Historical and contemporary examples of ceramic vessels are presented to students throughout the duration of the course. As a result, students acquire an appreciation for historic and contemporary ceramics and become able to critically discuss a myriad of ceramic artwork. Along with regular lectures, students are required to research and present on a contemporary ceramic artist.

Prerequisites
For Studio Art Majors and minors: ARTS 102 (no prerequisites for other students).

This course presents students with the spectacular possibilities of handbuilding techniques used to create ceramic objects. Different methods of creation are introduced throughout the duration of the course culminating in a final project that incorporates knowledge of these fundamental techniques. In tandem with these assignments, student also explore low temperature glaze formulation. Historical and contemporary examples of ceramic art are presented to students throughout the duration of the course. As a result, students acquire an appreciation for historic and contemporary ceramics and become able to critically discuss a myriad of ceramic artwork. Along with regular lectures, students are required to research and present on a contemporary ceramic artist.

Prerequisites
For Studio Art Majors and minors: ARTS 102 (no prerequisites for other students).

Students master basic skills in paint application and in rendering volumes and their environments. They learn the practical application of color theory to the visual analysis of particular light situations and to the mixing of pigment.

Prerequisites
For Studio Art majors and minors: ARTS 101 (no prerequisites for other students).

An exploration of form, mass, structure, surface and scale using steel as the primary medium. Welding construction, forging and shaping are introduced and put into practice through problem solving assignments.

Prerequisites
For Studio Art Majors and minors: ARTS 102 (no prerequisites for other students).

This course explores mass, structure, surface and scale using wood as the primary medium. Construction, carving, bending and joinery are introduced and put into practice through problem solving assignments.

Prerequisites
For Studio Art Majors and minors: ARTS 102 (no prerequisites for other students).

This beginning printmaking class introduces students to basic relief and intaglio printing techniques, in addition to a history of the media. Drawing is an important aspect of the two processes that is explored. Relief processes include transfer methods, safe use of carving tools, black and white and color printing. Intaglio processes include plate preparation, the application of grounds, methods of biting the plates with acids, Chine-coll?, and printing.

Prerequisites
For Studio Art majors and minors: ARTS 101 (no prerequisites for other students).

This beginning printmaking course introduces students to technical aspects and creative possibilities of lithography and screen printing. Planographic processes that are introduced include stone lithography and plate lithography. Students learn several non-toxic screen print procedures, including paper and fluid stencils, reduction printing and crayon resists. There is an overview of historical and contemporary works in each area.

Prerequisites
For Studio Art majors and minors: ARTS 101 (no prerequisites for other students).

This studio course provides practical knowledge of the tools necessary to generate and output creative digital images in print. Students learn how to utilize the tools of Photoshop and Illustrator. Students also become familiar with the use of a digital drawing tablet, digital camera, flatbed scanner, and film scanner. The course content includes digital drawing and painting, photography, and typography.

Prerequisites
ARTS 101

This course explores drawing and painting a means of seeing more acutely, examining cultural narratives, and experimenting with a range of materials. Technical skills are fused with conceptual inquiries and critical analysis. This course emphasizes the interplay between intellectual, expressive, and material aspects of the creative process as they relate to recording and relating visual relationships, expressing spatial and temporal phenomena, and critically engaging with art historical, contemporary, and personal issues and narratives relating to the figure and/or body. The course will begin with explorations of different drawing media and approaches and then shift to painting processes. Additionally, an examination of contemporary trends in art informs the themes and approaches explored in this course.

Prerequisites
ARTS 101

This course examines advanced methods of forming and decorating ceramics. Instruction covers clay bodies, glaze, surface treatment, and the loading and firing of kilns. Group and individual critiques focus on defining and developing a personal style.

Prerequisites
ARTS 247 or 248.

Students develop a personal visual vocabulary by making deliberate choices about subject matter and the handling of media. This course combines assignments, including 4 - 5 weeks of figure painting, which build technical skills and encourage explorations of distinct layering processes with the development of an independent series of paintings. Students also learn to mix paint, and experiment with different kinds of pigments, thereby developing a deeper understanding of materials. In addition to engaging with distinct processes and techniques, this course will introduce and examine contemporary trends in painting. This course takes place in tandem with ARTS 450; intermediate students share work days and critiques with advanced students.

Prerequisites
ARTS 101 and 251.

This course emphasizes the combination of materials, use of alternative materials, and scale and presentation. Mold making and casting are introduced along with other contemporary sculptural issues such as site work.

Prerequisites
ARTS 265 or ARTS 266

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the history and techniques of East Asian calligraphy as one of the supreme artistic accomplishments in China, Japan, and Korea. It combines the historical study of this art form with its hand-on practice as an art performance. Emphasis is put on the understanding of the multi-function of calligraphy in East Asian society.

Students further develop their studio practice in the printmaking area. Students focus on one of four major print areas -- lithography, etching, relief, and screenprint -- or work with a combination of these processes. The collograph is introduced in addition to photo-mechanical and digitally augmented printmaking methods, such as photo-etching, photo-lithography, and laser lithography. Multiple plate color printing and serial imagery may also be explored. Students develop concept and technique within the language of multiples.

Prerequisites
ARTS 101 and ARTS 281 or ARTS 282.

This advanced course requires students to further develop an individual direction with their use of the ceramic medium. Focus is placed on nurturing a creative voice, but is balanced with an emphasis on continued experimentation with clay and glaze formulation. Taking place in tandem with Art 347, advanced students share work days and critique days with intermediate students. Along with regular lectures, students research, interview, and present on a contemporary ceramic artist. Exploration is project based in this course and evaluation is based as much on content as on craftsmanship.

Prerequisites
ARTS 347

This course promotes the exploration of personal artistic motivations and independent relationships to processes and materials. Students are encouraged to work from the figure, pushing issues of scale and experimentation with materials for 4 - 5 weeks of the semester. Additionally, students expand upon their understandings of process, media, and conceptual issues, generating an independent, advanced series of work. Students also examine and interrogate contemporary artistic issues and trends in written and oral forms of communication. This course takes place in tandem with ARTS 350, advanced students share work days and may share critiques with intermediate students.

Prerequisites
ARTS 101, 201, 251, and 350.

This advanced course provides the structure enabling each student to develop an individualized program of studio practice. This practice will consist of creating a consistent, coherent, body of work where individual students galvanize their formal and conceptual concerns.

Prerequisites
ARTS 355.

Students develop independent projects with print media, furthering their critical thinking and artistic growth. Students engage in a concentrated study and studio practice. Print matrices and substrates may be examined as tools for editing, variation, accumulation, distribution or other means. Students investigate scale and format with their projects and have the opportunity to explore relationships between printmaking and other media such as installation, digital media, and textiles. Students will consider the production of prints within the context of contemporary culture and print history. Inventiveness, individual problem solving, risk taking and a willingness to challenge one's abilities are essential to this class. Students write proposals, make studies, and build production schedules for projects. Students also draft and redraft an artist statement. During the semester, students research at least one new process or variation of a major print process and give a demonstration. Critical thinking is developed through class critiques, writing assignments, and reading responses. The course also discusses professional opportunities and practices in the field of printmaking.

Prerequisites
ARTS 281, 282, and 382.

This advanced studio course in 2D studies designed to help students develop a coherent body of work.

Prerequisites
ARTS 350 or ARTS 382

This advanced studio course in 3D studies is designed to help students develop a coherent body of work.

Prerequisites
ARTS 347 or ARTS 355

Independent study is available to those students who wish to continue their learning in an area after completing the regularly offered courses in that area.

Prerequisites
Junior or Senior standing and at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

Independent study is available to those students who wish to continue their learning in an area after completing the regularly offered courses in that area.

Prerequisites
Junior or Senior standing and at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

This scheduled weekly interdisciplinary seminar provides the context to reflect on concrete experiences at an off-campus internship site and to link these experiences to academic study relating to the political, psychological, social, economic and intellectual forces that shape our views on work and its meaning. The aim is to integrate study in the liberal arts with issues and themes surrounding the pursuit of a creative, productive, and satisfying professional life. Students receive 1.0 unit of academic credit for the academic work that augments their concurrent internship fieldwork. This course is not applicable to the Upper-Division Graduation Requirement. Only 1.0 unit may be assigned to an individual internship and no more than 2.0 units of internship credit, or internship credit in combination with co-operative education credit, may be applied to an undergraduate degree.

Prerequisites
Junior or Senior standing and at least a 2.50 cumulative grade point average.