This course is an advising section for students interested in exploring allied health professions, such as nursing, occupation therapy, and physical therapy, in addition to the liberal arts and sciences. The three objectives of the course are 1) to define the roles and functions of occupational therapists, physical therapists, and other allied health professionals in a variety of settings; 2) to explore current issues in U.S. health care delivery; and 3) to explore students' alternative academic interests to ensure that their courses of study will be chosen in a well-informed and considered way. NOTE: This course is not required for the OT program, nor will it meet any requirements for that degree.

This course provides students with an overall understanding of the occupational therapy process and fundamental knowledge and skills for professional practice. The course emphasizes the nature of occupation, how participation in occupation is an organizing force throughout the life span, and ways that occupational performance is affected by individual and environmental contextual factors.

Prerequisites
Admission to the School of Occupational Therapy.

This course critically examines the role of sociocultural, socioeconomic, and diversity factors as they impact participation in occupation for persons, groups, and populations in a changing healthcare environment. Using analytical and evaluative skills, students collaborate in problem-solving activities with classmates in and outside of class increase understanding of the ways in which race and class impact occupational performance and participation.

Prerequisites
Admission to the School of Occupational Therapy.

This course provides students with foundational knowledge and skills in skilled observation, activity analysis, and administration of assessments, including scoring, synthesis, and interpretation of the results of measurement for use in occupational therapy practice. Students critically evaluate a published test and form conclusions about the usefulness of the test for OT practice.

Prerequisites
Admission to the School of Occupational Therapy.

Essential gross anatomy of the musculoskeletal system of the limbs and trunk, including peripheral nerves and vascular structures, is studied as a basis for understanding and analyzing human functional movement. Biomechanical principles of human motion are studied, as well as kinesiologic analysis of movement. Introduction to goniometry, manual muscle testing, palpation of superficial structures, and clinical presentations are also covered.

Prerequisites
Admission to the School of Occupational Therapy.

This class is a foundation course designed to introduce occupational therapy students to the basic and applied functions of the human nervous system and begin to understand how those functions affect sensorimotor activity, cognitive/affective behavior, and, ultimately, occupational performance. Instruction on somatosensory and visual testing is included.

Prerequisites
Admission to the School of Occupational Therapy.

This foundation course is designed to introduce occupational therapy students to the basic and applied principles of the human nervous system in terms of development, gross and microscopic structure, neurophysiology, basic functions and the integration of these functions into motor activity and cognitive/affective behavior. The anatomical/functional relationship foundation will provide the basis for understanding of consequences of selected congenital anomalies, behaviorial disorders, and disease and injury of the neuraxis. Introduction to tactile sensory testing is included. The overall organizing principle of this course is based in linking structure/function/dysfunction for the major regions and systems of the nervous system. The content is focused in such a way as to emphasize an occupational therapist's need to understand neurological principles from three major perspectives: developmental, sensori-motor, and cognitive/affective. It is not the intent of this course to provide a comprehensive review of clinical conditions, assessment procedures or treatment protocols. Those topics are covered in other courses.

Students engage in and develop clinical reasoning skills related to a thorough exploration of: types of intervention, intervention approaches and intervention review across the lifespan. In addition, planning for outcomes as part of the occupational therapy process is discussed. Students have opportunities to analyze, apply, and evaluate knowledge and skills to different settings, populations, and diagnoses; and explore evidence supporting occupational therapy interventions. During labs, students apply knowledge and skills while practicing documentation strategies.

Prerequisites
OT 601, 602, and 603.

This course examines participation in occupation as an organizing force throughout the lifespan and as a key determinant of health. The course also provides an overview of scientific, sociocultural, economic, and political factors that impact the practice of occupational therapy in a changing health care environment. The course emphasizes foundational skills and knowledge concerning the nature of occupation and ways that occupational performance is affected by individual and environmental contextual factors. Course topics include the following: perspective consciousness, sociocultural awareness, the World Health Organization Model for viewing function and dysfunction, and the occupational therapy process in conjunction with the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework. Students collaborate in problem solving activities with classmates in and outside of class in order to address the impact of disability and dysfunction on occupational performance and participation.

Prerequisites
Admission to the School of Occupational Therapy.

This 0.5 unit course addresses issues in human aging that are relevant to occupational therapists. Theories of aging are reviewed and attitudes explored. Physical and psychosocial age-related changes are identified, special topics related to care in gerontology, and the therapist's role in assessment and intervention, as it is unique to geriatric practice, is discussed.

The Occupational Performance Adaptation series (I, II, & III) is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills to use a "modify/adapt" intervention approach to meet occupational performance needs of individuals and populations with varied disabilities in diverse practice settings. Occupational Performance Adaptations I introduces students to the fundamental skills of activity analysis, adaptation, and instruction. Students then apply these skills to a wide range of activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental ADL (IADL) tasks to develop intervention plans that promote participation in ADL and IADL. Students also learn to evaluate ADL and IADL with a focus on measurement and analysis of the person-task-environment transaction of clients (individuals and populations) with varied impairments, ages, and backgrounds. Specific learning objectives follow.

The second course in the Occupational Performance Adaptations series continues to prepare students to analyze the person-task-environment interaction of individuals with various disabilities and impairments, and formulate appropriate interventions to promote functional independence with a focus on wheelchair seating/positioning and mobility, work (including ergonomics), and sleep/rest. Students discuss Title I of the ADA related to employment access and reasonable accommodations.

The third and final course in the Occupational Performance Adaptations series continues to prepare students to analyze the person-task-environment interaction of individuals with various disabilities and impairments, using a modify-adapt approach. Students formulate appropriate interventions including adaptive devices to promote functional independence in activities of daily living, community mobility, driving, education, communication and play, leisure and social participation, and incorporation of technological adaptations across the lifespan. In addition, students discuss the ADA related to each area and the potential impact on participation.

In this course, student groups continue work on their evidence-in-practice projects begun at the end of OT 634. Specifically, MSOT students collaborate with OTD students to develop a full CAT proposal and receive the approval of project mentor and chair. OTD/MSOT student groups make oral presentations of the CAT Proposal to the class and participate in giving and receiving peer review and feedback.

Prerequisites
OT 634

In this course, the combined MSOT/OTD student groups continue the evidence-in-practice projects begun in OT 634 to implement the research, analyze findings, and synthesize implications of the evidence project, including development of a scholarly written report. Student groups collaborate with the community practitioner and develop an Involvement Plan based on principles of translational research.

Prerequisites
OT 630

The course prepares students to analyze the person-task-environment interaction of individuals with various disabilities and impairments, and formulate appropriate interventions including adaptive technology devices, to promote functional independence in activities of daily living, work, and leisure. Mini-clinics are included.

This course introduces the context of OT research, the major types of research, issues of research design, concepts of evidence-based practice, and the principles of descriptive and inferential statistics. Students analyze and interpret data, complete and present pilot descriptive research projects, and begin preparations for implementation of the evidence project in OT 630 or OT 730.

Prerequisites
Admission to the School of Occupational Therapy.

The practice of occupational therapy must continue to be studied, improved through empirical research, and the process of this evolution itself investigated. The efficacy of many occupational therapy interventions must be supported in literature and applied to practice. The lived experience of occupation--in health or in illness--needs to be investigated and documented, so that the effects of intervention on actual clients can be better understood. The evidence needs of practitioners must be studied from the perspective of occupational therapists themselves.

The practice of occupational therapy must continue to be studied, improved through empirical research, and the process of this evolution itself investigated. The efficacy of many occupational therapy interventions must be supported in literature and applied to practice. The lived experience of occupation--in health or in illness--needs to be investigated and documented, so that the effects of intervention on actual clients can be better understood. The evidence needs of practitioners must be studies from the perspective of the occupational therapists themselves.

Student groups continue their work on the evidence-in-practice projects begun in OT 634. Activities include translating knowledge, studying the implementation of the knowledge, and becoming familiar with methods for disseminating knowledge. The course culminates with a poster presentation of the evidence and knowledge translation project at the OT Research Poster Symposium.

Prerequisites
OT 631

This course prepares students to analyze and apply the person-task-environment interaction of individuals with various disabilities and impairments, with an emphasis on services addressing advanced technology, ergonomics and work.

Prerequisites
OT 601, 603, 605, 610, 614, and 644.

This course covers occupational therapy for clients throughout the lifespan with occupational performance defecits that can be remediated throught the use of a biomechanical approach to treatment, primarily musculoskeletal and medical disorders. The course begins with general approaches to the evaluation of strength, range of motion, sensation, endurance, fatigue, edema, and pain. Building on this foundation, students learn about a range of common medical conditions and explore the relationships among specific trauma/disease processes (pathology), client factors (impairments), and the resulting limitations in occupational performance (disability). Students apply the occupational therapy process using a biomechanical approach to meet the needs of clients with specific physical dysfunction through developing skills in the use of sound clinical evaluation with valid assessment techniques and the selection and application of appropriate treatment modalities. Special considerations for using a biomechanical approach to occupational therapy with children and youth are addressed in the seminar for this course.

This course develops theoretical knowledge of and practice skills for the occupational therapy process with clients with diverse psychosocial needs, ranging from the importance and meaning of occupation for mental health promotion to the impact of psychiatric conditions on occupational performance. Students administer assessment methods, identify and analyze occupational needs related to mental health, and compare a variety of evidence-informed psychosocial intervention approaches. Therapeutic use of self and reflection and reasoning is further developed while designing and implementing therapeutic group interventions. Doctoral students further evaluate evidence that supports the role of occupation in the promotion of mental health and prevention of mental illness.

Prerequisites
Admission to the School of Occupational Therapy.

This course addresses evaluation and treatment of adults with occupational performance deficits that result from a variety of acquired musculoskeletal and/or neurological disorders. Building upon foundational information learned in the introduction to evaluation and treatment courses, students will analyze and apply scientific evidence to understanding assessment and treatment principles specific to adult populations, utilizing a variety of models and frames of reference to inform their clinical reasoning.

Prerequisites
OT 601, 603, 605, 610, 614, and 644.

The domain and process of occupational therapy services for infants, children and adolescents across a variety of settings will be discussed and explored with an emphasis on theoretical, legal and ethical foundations to pediatric practice, diagnosis, evaluation, intervention and outcomes. Students will analyze and apply a variety of evidence to support clinical and professional reasoning when working with this population.

Prerequisites
OT 601, 603, 605, 610, 614, and 644.

This course continues to prepare students in the occupational therapy processes of evaluation and intervention planning for adults with occupational performance deficits that result from a variety of acquired musculoskeletal and/or neurological conditions. Students will also analyze and apply scientific evidence for designing and prescribing successful home program interventions, understanding the impact that mobility and accessibility within the environment have on overall health and occupational performance, and developing strategies to promote health and wellness at the individual and population levels.

Prerequisites
OT 645

This course continues to prepare students to work with infants, children and adolescents across settings and diagnoses in order to support development, occupational performance, participation and health and wellness. Students will develop knowledge and strategies to analyze and apply the occupational therapy process at the population and systems levels in addition to the individual.

Prerequisites
OT 646

This course addresses issues in human aging that are relevant to occupational therapists. Theories of aging are reviewed and attitudes explored. Physical and psychosocial age-related changes are identified, special topics related to care of the older adult, and the therapist's role in assessment and intervention, as it is unique to practice with individuals 55 years and older, are discussed.

Prerequisites
OT 645

This seminar provides an in-depth examination of research evidence related to the practice of occupational therapy. Students learn how to integrate research evidence into the clinical reasoning process. Various sections focus on specific practice settings: assistive technology, biomechanical treatment, mental health, neurological treatment, or pediatrics.

Prerequisites
Admission to post-professional MSOT program

In this course, students complete 12 hours of observation/collaboration in an assigned Level I Fieldwork setting with an occupational therapist or at an emerging practice site. Course also includes 3 seminar sessions.

Prerequisites
Admission to the School of Occupational Therapy.

Experiential learning enables students to develop meaningful connections between course content and the occupational needs of individuals, organizations, and communities. Students engage in service hours in a setting that provides professional development experience relevant to occupational therapy practice and/or with the populations served by occupational therapists. Students reflect on diversity and individual differences, meaningful occupation, and their own professionalism and lifelong learning and growth.

Prerequisites
OT 651

Experiential learning enables students to develop meaningful connections between course content and the occupational needs of individuals, organizations, and communities. Students engage in service hours in a setting that provides professional development experience relevant to occupational therapy practice and/or with the populations served by occupational therapists. Students reflect on diversity and individual differences, meaningful occupation, and their own professionalism and lifelong learning and growth.

Prerequisites
OT 651

In this course, students complete 20 hours of observation/collaboration in a clinical setting or some other experience specific to occupational therapy in order to further develop their understanding of occupation, the role of the occupational therapist and clinical/professional reasoning. The experience/setting will be mutually agreed upon by the student and the coordinator of the authentic learning experiences.

The seminar examines approaches to the study of outcomes of occupational therapy service delivery. The rigorous design and implementation of such studies are addressed. A pilot project allows focus on specific practice settings: assistive technology, biomechanical treatment, mental health, neurological treatment, or pediatrics.

Prerequisites
Admission to post-professional MSOT program

Fundamental aspects of health care administration, management, program development, health literacy, and telehealth are studied. Course content includes: features of program development (needs assessment, outcome measures relevant to program development); basic information regarding financing and reimbursement of health services; human and technological resources for telehealth and health literacy; social and global health issues; understanding personal leadership style and preference, and basic requirements for management and supervision for occupational therapy services. Students examine the origins, evolution and trends in the organization and delivery of health services in the U.S. and consider the international trends related to global health concerns.

This course will cover fundamental aspects of health care administration and emerging management practice. Information regarding financing and reimbursement of health services, and social and global health issues will be covered. Supervisory relationships, the law related to occupational therapy practice, and ethical scenarios will be explored.

Prerequisites
OT 680 and admission to the MSOT program.

The mental health clinical experience provides students with opportunities to engage in the community and is part of the Level I fieldwork series. It is designed to assist in the transition from the role of student to that of therapist by engaging in the occupational therapy process in its entirety.

Prerequisites
OT 644

As a continuing part of the Level I Fieldwork series, students gain authentic, practical experience with the occupational therapy process by working with both an adult and child client in the Puget Sound occupational therapy teaching clinics. Course learning activities enhance both foundational knowledge and the critical thinking skills necessary for professionalism and lifelong learning and growth.

As a continuing part of the Level I Fieldwork series, students gain authentic, practical experience with the occupational therapy process by working with both an adult and child client in the Puget Sound occupational therapy teaching clinics. Course learning activities enhance both foundational knowledge and the critical thinking skills necessary for professionalism and lifelong learning and growth.

The Fieldwork II experience consists of two 12-week, full-time placements and is an essential part of the educational program. It is completed in two different practice settings as students work toward developing the entry level skills of a generalist OT. Successful completion of Fieldwork II includes passing scores on the AOTA Fieldwork Performance Evaluation for the Occupational Therapy Student at the conclusion of each placement and the approval of the OT program director.

The Fieldwork II experience consists of two 12-week, full-time placements and is an essential part of the educational program. It is completed in two different practice settings as students work toward developing the entry-level skills of a generalist OT. Successful completion of Fieldwork II includes passing scores on the AOTA Fieldwork Performance Evaluation for the Occupational Therapy Student at the conclusion of each placement and the approval of the OT program director.

A minimum of 10-12 weeks fulltime experience in a community agency, hospital setting, or public school, with guided experience in evaluation and treatment of children. Non-credit students may take this course on a pass/fail grading basis only. Fee required.

Fulltime experience of 8-12 weeks, to be served in such specialty areas as hand therapy, home health, or burns treatment. Pass/fail grading only. Fee required.

Occupational Therapy Fieldwork Experiences
A variety of clinical centers within an hour's drive of the University provide part-time experience for Occupational Therapy students in conjunction with academic courses throughout the curriculum (Fieldwork I). Clinical centers for OT 670 (Fieldwork II), OT 675 (Pediatrics), and OT 676 (Specialty Area) are available in approximately 12 states in the U.S. It is possible to arrange for optional fieldwork (OT 675, OT 676) to be done internationally. The program's Academic Fieldwork Coordinator assists students in their selection of fieldwork sites and consults with them during their clinical education experiences.

In this course students learn foundational concepts of professionalism, universal principles of professional therapist-client interaction, and assimilation of a professional self-identity. Key concepts include personal responsibility for learning, therapeutic use of self, professional communication, clinical reasoning and reflection, professional behaviors, and understanding self as a professional.

Prerequisites
Admission to the School of Occupational Therapy.

Students in the MOT program complete this seminar concurrently with their elective course. Students share material from their various elective courses as they gain tools for systems analysis of societal settings with people in need of occupational therapy services. Analysis is conducted at the levels of clientele, agencies, and environments.

Each MOT student in this course implements an occupational therapy program development or policy project, based on the real needs of an identified clientele. The plan includes analysis at the individual, agency, and environment levels. Each MOT student makes a public presentation of the outcomes.

In this course students focus on a single occupational therapy clinical setting, such as rehabilitation centers or schools, and explore how the occupational therapy process can be effectively implemented in such settings. The interplay of policy and practice issues is examined.

Prerequisites
Admission to post-professional MSOT program

Independent study is available to those students who wish to continue their learning in an area after completing the regularly offered courses in that area.

Each MSOT student develops a research proposal with a complete review of literature and appropriate research design and methodology.

Each MSOT student conducts the approved research proposal to include data collection and analysis, and composes an article in journal style suitable for publication.

Continued expertise development results in refinement of one's professional craft knowledge and professional practice. In this course, students learn about advanced knowledge and practice in occupational therapy by reflecting on, discussing and analyzing how occupational therapists know what they know (professional craft knowledge), knowledge and expertise development, and the conceptual foundations of occupational therapy in order to further develop their skills as an advanced healthcare professional. Using Occupational Therapy Practice Framework and the Centennial Vision to frame the discussion, this course emphasizes the complexities of conscience and judicious integration of occupational therapy models and theories into practice. Through greater familiarity with information resources and guided principles of continuous improvement of clinical expertise, professional sophistication is advanced. Students have opportunities to apply what they learn to a specific practice setting and/or population and their roles as an occupational therapist.

Prerequisites
Admission into the DrOT program.

Professional Leadership in occupational therapy focuses on the application of theory and evidence in leadership to specific career goals. Students learn about different theories and models of leadership and change implementation and develop strategies for problem-solving when in a leadership role. Opportunities to explore their own leadership style and develop/continue to build their professional portfolio occur throughout the class.

Prerequisites
Admission into the DrOT program.

Management in occupational therapy builds on the content learned in the professional leadership class OT 712. Students learn systems theory specific to managing a project and/or department. Different management styles are explored and applied to the students' own practice and life goals. Finally, they examine types of change management and quality improvement in occupational therapy settings. Prerequisite: OT 712.

Prerequisites
OT 712

This course provides students with advanced knowledge and skills in teaching and learning for multiple settings and roles in which an occupational therapist educates or mentors clients, students, or staff. The course begins with adult learning theory that students then apply to patient/client education (both individuals and groups), teaching occupational therapy students in academic and fieldwork settings, developing continuing education programs, and mentoring/teaching staff in clinical settings. Students engage in authentic teaching and learning experiences, consistent with their plan of study and program goals.

This course prepares clinicians to be leaders in the area of occupational therapy health promotion interventions across the lifespan at a population level. Students explore the philosophical base to support occupational therapists' participation in interventions focused on health promotion and the distinctive perspective the profession brings to chronic disease management and fostering lifestyle behaviors that are health promoting across the lifespan. As part of this course, students are prepared to design and implement interventions in areas such as healthy technology use, obesity prevention, fall prevention, healthy aging in place, injury prevention, self-management for chronic diseases, and caregiver support programs.

In this course student groups continue work on their evidence-in-practice projects begun at the end of OT 734. OTD students design a detailed evidence search strategy, then, in collaboration with MSOT students, develop a full CAT proposal and receive the approval of project mentor and chair. OTD/MSOT student groups make oral presentations of the CAT Proposal to the class and participate in giving and receiving peer review and feedback.

Prerequisites
OT 634

In this course, the combined MSOT/OTD student groups continue the evidence-in-practice projects begun in OT 634 to implement the research, analyze findings, and synthesize implications of the evidence project, including development of a scholarly written report. Student groups collaborate with the community practitioner and develop an Involvement Plan based on principles of translational research.

Prerequisites
OT 730

In this course, students explore advanced ethical decision-making to support effective service delivery across occupational therapy settings and populations. This is done by first discussing morality and ethics and then by exploring ethics within a caring response. Students then review and analyze ethical theories and approaches. Students use case studies, debates and real-life scenarios from current work settings to apply a six-step process to ethical decision-making. Opportunities to explore and discuss complex ethical issues within professional relationships and across healthcare settings are provided.

Student groups continue their work on the evidence-in-practice projects begun in OT 634. Activities include translating knowledge, studying the implementation of the knowledge, and becoming familiar with methods for disseminating knowledge. Students begin preliminary preparation for the capstone experience. The course culminates with a poster presentation of the evidence and knowledge translation project at the OT Research Poster Symposium.

Prerequisites
OT 731

The American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) has identified the following as emerging practice areas to watch: addressing the psychosocial needs of children and youth; design and accessibility consulting and home modification; driver rehabilitation and training; ergonomics consulting; Health and Wellness consulting; low vision services; private practice community health services; technology and assistive device development and consulting; Welfare-to-Work services; and Ticket-to-Work services. While these areas have been identified by AOTA and are part of the Centennial Vision, opportunities for developing emerging practice areas are limitless. Students learn how occupation focused practice can be applied to a wide variety of settings and circumstances in order to improve the health and well-being of a diverse range of people. Through the use of policy, societal initiatives and current research, students will look to the future to develop a vision for role emerging opportunities in occupational therapy. As part of this course, each student completes an in-depth exploration of 2-3 of emerging practice areas.

This course is the first in a series in which students design and implement an original research project. Students identify an area for in-depth consideration, either through research or program development, within occupational therapy; outline the need for focused attention on this area; and develop a proposal for project implementation.

Prerequisites
Admission into the DrOT program.

This course is the second in a series in which students design and implement an original research project. Students further refine their proposal and begin to implement their project.

This course is the last in a series in which students design and implement an original research project. Students complete their project including a professional paper. The course culminates in a presentation by the student to the campus and wider community on the entire project.

This course prepares students to analyze, apply, and evaluate the person-task-environment interaction of individuals with various disabilities and impairments, with an emphasis on services addressing advanced technology, ergonomics, and work.

Prerequisites
OT 601, 603, 605, 610, 614, and 644.

This course addresses evaluation and treatment of adults with occupational performance deficits that result from a variety of acquired musculoskeletal and/or neurological disorders. Building upon foundational information learned in the introduction to evaluation and treatment courses, students will analyze, apply, and evaluate scientific evidence to understanding assessment and treatment principles specific to adult populations, utilizing a variety of models and frames of reference to inform their clinical reasoning.

Prerequisites
OT 601, 603, 605, 610, 614, and 644.

The domain and process of occupational therapy services for infants, children and adolescents across a variety of settings will be discussed and explored with an emphasis on theoretical, legal and ethical foundations to pediatric practice, diagnosis, evaluation, intervention and outcomes. Students will analyze, apply and evaluate a variety of evidence to support clinical and professional reasoning when working with this population.

Prerequisites
OT 601, 603, 605, 610, 614, and 644.

This course continues to prepare students in the occupational therapy processes of evaluation and intervention planning for adults with occupational performance deficits that result from a variety of acquired musculoskeletal and/or neurological conditions. Students will also evaluate, analyze, and apply scientific evidence for designing and prescribing successful home program interventions, understanding the impact that mobility and accessibility within the environment have on overall health and occupational performance, and developing strategies to promote health and wellness at the individual and population levels.

Prerequisites
OT 745

This course continues to prepare students to work with infants, children, and adolescents across settings and diagnoses in order to support development, occupational performance, participation, and health and wellness. Students will develop knowledge and strategies to analyze, apply, and evaluate the occupational therapy process at the population and systems levels in addition to the individual.

Prerequisites
OT 746

This course addresses issues in human aging that are relevant to occupational therapists. Theories of aging are reviewed and attitudes explored. Students will apply, analyze, and evaluate the scientific evidence as it relates to physical and psychosocial age-related changes, special topics related to care of the older adult, and the therapist?s role in assessment and intervention unique to the practice with individuals 55 years and older.

Prerequisites
OT 745

In this course, students complete a minimum of 20 hours of work in a clinical setting or some other setting that provides professional development experience specifically relevant to his or her course of study. Experiential learning opportunities are designed to help students develop meaningful connections between their course of study and communities of practice to promote students' advanced knowledge and application of occupational therapy practice in order to further refine their professional craft knowledge. The experience or setting is mutually agreed upon by the student and the advisor and the coordinator of experiential learning. Pass/fail grading only.

In this course students complete a minimum of 20 hours of work in a clinical setting or some other setting that provides professional development experience specifically relevant to his or her course of study. Experiential learning opportunities are designed to help students develop meaningful connections between their course of study and communities of practice to promote students' advanced knowledge and application of occupational therapy practice in order to further their professional craft knowledge. The experience or setting is mutually agreed upon by the student and the advisor and the coordinator of the experiential learning. Pass/fail grading only.

In this course students complete a minimum of 20 hours of work in a clinical setting or some other setting that provides professional development experience specifically relevant to his or her course of study. Experiential learning opportunities are designed to help students develop meaningful connections between their course of study and communities of practice to promote students advanced knowledge and application of occupational therapy practice in order to further refine their professional craft knowledge. The experience or setting is mutually agreed upon by the student and the advisor and the coordinator of the experiential learning. Pass/fail grading only.

Prerequisites
OT 751

This course advances knowledge in the areas of policy and advocacy that affect occupational therapy services across practice areas. Some issues from earlier coursework, such as in leadership and management, are revisited. However, in this course, students discover how and why these issues are formed and how and why they change over time. Students reflect upon their own practice and explore and discuss how occupational therapists can influence these systems issues across settings. This knowledge is then applied to a practice setting in order to further develop expertise.

The mental health clinical experience provides students with opportunities to engage in the community and is part of the Level I fieldwork series. It is designed to assist in the transition from the role of student to that of therapist by engaging in the occupational therapy process in its entirety.

Prerequisites
OT 644

As a continuing part of the Level I Fieldwork series, students gain authentic, practical experience with the occupational therapy process by working with both an adult and child client in the Puget Sound occupational therapy teaching clinics. Course learning activities enhance both foundational knowledge and the critical thinking skills necessary for professionalism and lifelong learning and growth.

As a continuing part of the Level I Fieldwork series, students gain authentic, practical experience with the occupational therapy process by working with both an adult and child client in the Puget Sound occupational therapy teaching clinics. Course learning activities enhance both foundational knowledge and the critical thinking skills necessary for professionalism and lifelong learning and growth.

The Fieldwork II experience consists of two 12-week, full time placements and is an essential part of the educational program. It is completed in two different practice settings as students work toward developing the entry level skills of a generalist OT. Successful completion of Fieldwork II includes passing scores on the AOTA Fieldwork Performance Evaluation for the Occupational Therapy Student at the conclusion of each placement and the approval of the OT program director.

The Fieldwork II experience consists of two 12-week, full-time placements and is an essential part of the educational program. It is completed in two different practice settings as students work toward developing the entry level skills of a generalist OT. Successful completion of Fieldwork II includes passing scores on the AOTA Fieldwork Performance Evaluation for the Occupational Therapy Student at the conclusion of each placement and the approval of the OT program director.

Students engage with the professionalization of occupational therapy practice to learn about and develop personal responsibility for professional membership and engagement, interprofessional professionalism, and professional reasoning. Additional topics include contribution and service to the profession, the role of organizational governance in promoting professionalism, professional communication and collaboration, ethical decision-making and practice, and clinical decision making as an occupational therapy professional.

Prerequisites
OT 680

This third course focuses on leadership in occupational therapy, supervision, and issues in clinical management as well as reimbursement. Students gain deep self-awareness by completing emotional intelligence and self-regulation assessments, and use resulting knowledge to create independent work plans to support completion of the doctoral capstone experience.

Prerequisites
OT 781

This hybrid course is comprised of an intensive classroom series followed by online classroom activities over the ensuing ten weeks. Instructional topics include project management skills, fidelity in project implementation, documentation of processes, budget planning, and strategies for success in independent work. Students conceptualize and design capstone projects in the areas of Clinical Practice Skills, Research, Administration, Leadership, Program and Policy Development, Advocacy, and Education.

Prerequisites
OT 737

Students participate in this course through an e-classroom format concurrent with OT 770. The focus is on capstone planning with content and learning experiences individually tailored to support each student in preparing for implementation of the capstone experience. Students complete extensive literature reviews to support the capstone project/experience, confirm a site mentor with expertise in the area of focus, complete and analyze a site needs assessment, and develop individualized learning objectives and plans for supervision during the overall capstone.

Prerequisites
OT 783

The Capstone experience consists of one 14-week, full-time placement and is an essential part of the educational program. Students initiate and sustain independent work on the capstone project, consulting with the Site Mentor, Faculty Mentor, and Capstone Coordinator as necessary, to carry out contracted project goals and objectives including discontinuation and sustainability of the capstone. The course culminates in a final week of on-campus coursework addressing reflection on the capstone experience, innovations in practice, preparation for academia, preparation for the certification exam, and capstone dissemination.

Prerequisites
OT 770, 771, 783, and 784.