This course surveys music-making practices in the Western hemisphere. Students will consider musics of various styles, historical periods, and cultural settings, with an emphasis on critical listening. Includes experiential learning opportunities such as attending performances either on or off campus.

Prerequisites
Students with MUS 100 transfer credit may not take this course.
Code
Artistic Approaches

Development of skills in sight singing, melodic and harmonic dictation, transcription, and keyboard harmony to improve overall musicianship and comprehension of music theory and literature.

Prerequisites
Must be taken concurrently with MUS 103. Students with MUS 101/103 transfer credit may not take this course.

Continuation of MUS 101, including further diatonic intervals and more complicated rhythms in sight singing and melodic dictation, and all diatonic harmonies in harmonic dictation.

Prerequisites
MUS 101/103 or advanced placement by examination. Must be taken concurrently with MUS 104. Students with MUS 102/104 or MUS 101-104 transfer credit may not take this course.

This course consists of an introduction to music theory through the study of scales, key signatures, intervals, triads, seventh chords, lead-sheet symbols, Roman numeral analysis, harmonic function and progression, non-chord tones, melodic analysis, form in popular music, phrases in combination, and accompanimental textures. Students create an original arrangement of an existing song.

Prerequisites
Must be taken concurrently with MUS 101. Students with MUS 101/103, or MUS 101-104 combined transfer credit may not take this course.

In this second semester of music theory study, students will learn about figured bass, secondary chords, mode mixture, the Neapolitan chord, augmented sixth chords, and modulation with and without pivot chords including enharmonic modulation. Students create two original compositions.

Prerequisites
MUS 101/103 or advanced placement by examination. Must be taken concurrently with MUS 102. Students with MUS 102/104 or MUS 101-104 combined transfer credit may not take this course.

This course surveys the rich musical heritage of the United States from the Colonial Period to the present. It explores many of the musical traditions whose collective heterogeneity defines a country of diverse musical narratives. Musical styles and genres explored include art music, concert music, popular music, musical theatre, sacred music, country, folk, jazz, and rock.

Prerequisites
Students with MUS 105 transfer credit may not take this course.
Code
Artistic Approaches

Music majors attend 10 concerts, on or off campus, and submit printed programs and reflections at the end of the semester. Required of all music majors.

For Applied Music students otherthan Performance majors. One half-hour lesson per week is required. The choice of materials is left to the discretion of the instructors in each applied music area. In the jury examination given at the end of the term, students are required to perform excerpts from the material studied. Registration forlessons is administered through the Music office.

Prerequisites
Previous music experience; audition required.

For Applied Music students otherthan Performance majors. One half-hour lesson per week is required. The choice of materials is left to the discretion of the instructors in each applied music area. In the jury examination given at the end of the term, students are required to perform excerpts from the material studied. Registration forlessons is administered through the Music office.

Prerequisites
Previous music experience; audition required.

Designed for students with minimal guitar background. The course deals with music notation, scales, chords, and fundamental techniques of playing the guitar.

Continuation of MUS 113. Basic repertoire is developed as well as more advanced techniques.

Prerequisites
MUS 113 or permission of the instructor.

This course provides a practical approach to learning how to play a variety of American "acoustic roots" guitar styles, all using a flatpick and based on Celtic -based fiddle tunes. The course progresses from Celtic through Appalachian/old-timey, old country, and bluegrass styles with focus on rhythm and backup skills as much as lead playing techniques. Tunes are taught in the traditional manner: listening and repeating tune segments over and over (and over) until the song can be played by memory. The course also covers basic guitar maintenance techniques such as proper tuning, restringing, and setup, and covers some of the wide variety of steel-string guitar body styles and construction methods.

This course provides a practical, hands-on approach to learning how to play a variety of American guitar styles (using the acoustic steel-string guitar), including Delta and Piedmont 12-bar blues, "comping" behind standard swing-era songs, and finishing up with a bit of rockabilly. The techniques include 2- and 3- finger fingerpicking, Freddie Green-style 4-to-the-bar-backup, simple chord soloing, and Carl Perkins/Scotty Moore/James Burton styles. The course covers how to read and play along with a basic chord chart, as well as basic chord theory. Tunes are taught in the traditional manner: listening and repeating tune segments over and over (and over) the song can be played by memory. The course also focuses on ear training- hearing the changes in the song without using written charts or scores, in addition to covering basic guitar maintenance techniques such as proper tuning, restringing, and setup. Finally, some of the wide variety of steel-string guitar body styles and construction methods are demonstrated.

The preparation and performance of works for the musical stage.

Prerequisites
Audition Required.

Intended for those without prior musical training. Students discover music through physical and intellectual engagement, including performance, improvisation, composition, conducting and other movement, close listening, concertgoing, reading, writing, discussion, and collaboration. Basic note-reading skill is developed. Students should not take MUS 123 if they have taken, or are currently enrolled in, MUS 101/103.

Code
Artistic Approaches

An historical survey of the history of rock music from its origins in the 1950s through to the present, focusing on its musical elements of style, its principal innovators, the role of technology, and its sociology. Through extensive use of recorded works, this course develops critical listening skills, understanding, and appreciation of rock.

Prerequisites
Students with MUS 126 transfer credit may not take this course.
Code
Artistic Approaches

This course is an introductory look at processes of music learning and music education models in American public schools. Students study the beginnings of American music education and study core concepts related to music education. Students participate in school-based placements that allow for direct experience with children developing their music skills and knowledge.

Designed for Applied Music students admitted to the Performance degree or other Applied Music students with written permission from the Director of the School of Music. One hour-long or two half-hour lessons per week required. May be repeated for credit. Registration for lessons is throughthe Music office prior to university registration.

Designed for Applied Music students admitted to the Performance degree or other Applied Music students with written permission from the Director of the School of Music. One hour-long or two half-hour lessons per week required. May be repeated for credit. Registration for lessons is throughthe Music office prior to university registration.

Music for small vocal and instrumental ensembles.

Prepares and performs music of many styles. Makes public appearances throughout the year and tours in the Pacific Northwest.

Prepares and performs varied repertoire for mixed voices. Makes public appearances throughout the year and tours in the Pacific Northwest.

Preparation and performance of works for symphony orchestra. Makes public appearances throughout the year. Tours in the Pacific Northwest.

An all-university group for mixed voices. Local performances are scheduled each semester.

Selected by audition from the Adelphian Concert Choir, Voci d'Amici is a select, vocal chamber ensemble dedicated to the performance of repertoire from all musical epochs. The ensemble is self-conducted.

An auditioned ensemble of women singing both accompanied and a capella literature and appearing in concert several times each semester.

This course familiarizes pianists with the skills required of a collaborative/ensemble pianist. Depending on the semester, music is selected from song literature, opera, choral, instrumental, and concerto accompaniments. Discussion of specific skills and techniques required for effective collaboration and accompaniment are emphasized. The course focus is primarily on skill-building and practical experience in rehearsal and performance. Students focus on sight-reading, transposition, navigating orchestral reductions, reading choral scores, and coaching of student performances.

Prepares and performs music of many jazz styles for both large bands and small combos. The jazz band plays concerts throughout the year, both on and off campus.

An all-university ensemble for brass, woodwind, and percussion. Performs on campus each semester.

Chromatic exercises in sight singing, melodic and harmonic dictation, and keyboard harmony to improve overall musicianship and comprehension of music theory and literature.

Prerequisites
MUS 102/104 or advanced placement by examination. Must be taken concurrently with MUS 203. Students with MUS 201/203 transfer credit may not take this course.

Singing and keyboard exercises in counterpoint, jazz theory, and twentieth-century techniques. Dictation of contrapuntal examples, jazz scales and chords, and twentieth-century sonorities and pitch-sets. Harmonic dictation of all chromatic harmonies and modulations.

Prerequisites
MUS 201/203 or advanced placement by examination. Must be taken concurrently with MUS 204. Students with MUS 202/204 transfer credit may not take this course.

In this third semester of music theory, students learn to analyze binary, ternary, sonata, and rondo forms. Later in the semester, students learn about voice leading of triads, seventh chords, and all chromatic harmonies. Students compose and perform an original five-part rondo.

Prerequisites
MUS 102/104 or advanced placement by examination. Must be taken concurrently with MUS 201. Students with MUS 201/203 transfer credit may not take this course.

This course includes study of sixteenth- and eighteenth-century counterpoint through composition and analysis. Following this is an introduction to jazz theory through analysis. The semester concludes with study of twentieth-century compositional styles including Impressionism, extended tonality, set theory, serialism, and minimalism. Students compose and perform an original minimalist process piece.

Prerequisites
MUS 201/203 or advanced placement by examination. Must be taken concurrently with MUS 202. Students with MUS 202/204 transfer credit may not take this course.

This is a course designed for students who have had some prior instruction on the piano. With the piano as a medium students develop an artistic awareness of music from different cultures as well as historical periods. The course focuses on improving music reading ability, harmonizing melodies, improvisation, basic musicianship, and performance of repertoire from the advanced beginner/early intermediate level literature.

Prerequisites
Permission of the instructor.

For Applied Music students other than Performance majors. One half-hour lesson per week is required. The choice of materials is left to the discretion of the instructors in each applied music area. In the jury examination given at the end of the term, students are required to perform excerpts from the material studied. Registration forlessons is administered through the Music office.

Prerequisites
Previous music experience; audition required.

For Applied Music students other than Performance majors. One half-hour lesson per week is required. The choice of materials is left to the discretion of the instructors in each applied music area. In the jury examination given at the end of the term, students are required to perform excerpts from the material studied. Registration forlessons is administered through the Music office.

Prerequisites
Previous music experience; audition required.

A historical survey that focuses on the principal developments and creators of the modern Broadway musical from the 1920s to the present. Through a study of representative musicals the course emphasizes the relationship between music and drama, critical, analytical, authenticity, and social issues, the creative and collaborative process, and adaptation.

Prerequisites
Students with MUS 220/226 transfer credit may not take this course.
Code
Artistic Approaches

A historical survey that focuses on the principal elements and styles of jazz, its trends and innovators, and its sociology. The course is designed to develop a critical awareness, understanding, and appreciation of jazz.

Prerequisites
Students with MUS 221 transfer credit may not take this course.
Code
Artistic Approaches

An introductory survey of music traditions from among world cultures, approached from an ethnomusicological perspective. "Music" in this course is considered broadly, and refers to performance and ritual traditions and their complex intersections with culture, daily life, and society. The regional focuses of the traditions studied come from various parts of the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Europe.

Prerequisites
Students with MUS 222 transfer credit may not take this course.
Code
Artistic Approaches

This course critically explores women's contributions to music in a variety of roles and cultural contexts. Figures studied include historical and contemporary popstars, composers, directors, dancers, and everyday women, who make music as part of their daily lives.

Code
Artistic Approaches

An introductory survey of music of the Classical era (1750-1825). Students explore the historical and stylistic developments of this period through the life and works of the period's three masters, Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven.

Code
Artistic Approaches

An introductory survey of music in the Romantic era (1815-1900) beginning with the late works of Beethoven and Schubert and ending with the works of Mahler and Debussy at the turn of the twentieth century. Students explore historical and stylistic developments through the critical study of representative works from the period. Major genres, the lives of the composers, and the creative process are examined, and the importance of the artist for society is considered.

Prerequisites
Students with MUS 225 transfer credit may not take this course.
Code
Artistic Approaches

This introductory survey introduces students to twentieth-century European and North American classical music by exploring the use of major twentieth-century musical styles and individual works in movies. Students develop analytical tools to understand and communicate effectively about a wide range of compositional languages, while also considering how particular styles and compositions are put into dialogue with a film's visual, narrative, and affective content. Composers who wrote specifically for movies, such as Aaron Copland, Bernard Herrmann, and Philip Glass, are considered alongside those such as Bela Bartok and Gyorgy Ligeti, whose works were appropriated by directors.

Prerequisites
Students who have taken or will take MUS 333 should speak to the instructor before registering for MUS 226. Students with MUS 226 transfer credit may not take this course.
Code
Artistic Approaches

Following an introduction to the meanings and purposes of music history and how it is conceived and studied, the course surveys the history of Western music and musical style from its foundations in ancient Greece through the death of Bach and Handel at the end of the Baroque era. Students explore such topics as the orgins and development of sacred and secular monophonic and polyphonic music in the Middle Ages and the continuing development of vocal and instrumental styles, genres, and forms in the Renaissance and Baroque eras. The focus of each class is on detailed historical, analytical, and critical study of representative works and the issues they raise through lectures, class discussions, readings, listening, and writing assignments. Students are expected to enter the course having already learned to read music or to be prepared to quickly master this essential skill.

Prerequisites
MUS 102 and 104 or instructor permission.
Code
Artistic Approaches

A survey of music history that traces the development of Western musical styles, genres, and ideas from the late-eighteenth classical style of Haydn and Mozart, nineteenth-century Romanticism from Beethoven to Mahler, and the birth of Modernism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Topics include the development of major instrumental and vocal genres, including the symphony, string quartet, concerto, the solo sonata and character piece for piano, the 'Lied' and song cycle, and opera. The focus of each class is on detailed historical, analytical, and critical study of representative works by major figures and the issues they raise through lectures, class discussions, readings, listening, and writing assignments.

Prerequisites
MUS 102 and 104 or instructor permission.

This course explores Western art music as a humanistic study. It provides a survey of representative styles, musicians, and works from 1600 to the present, including jazz. Readings, writing assignments, and experiences both in and out of class introduce students to the diverse methods of historical musicology, including a variety of critical perspectives, and archival and secondary research. Students engage in close listening, musical analysis, and discussion. Emphasis is placed throughout the semester on the relevance, value, and pleasures of musicological knowledge and approaches.

Prerequisites
MUS 102 and 104 or instructor permission.

This course will introduce students to methods and issues in the discipline of ethnomusicology, wherein music is studied among its complex intersections with daily life. The course introduces pathways for studying music ethnographically, rendering transparent how music can be explored as culture. Students will approach the study of ethnomusicology through a variety of world music case studies, and will have the opportunity to conduct their own ethnographic fieldwork.

Prerequisites
MUS 233 or instructor permission.
Code
Artistic Approaches

An introduction to the symbols of the International Phonetic Alphabet and how to use those symbols in the study of languages. The course also studies and applies the basic rules of English and Italian diction for singers through oral drills and transcription of song texts.

Devoted to the study of German and French diction for singers. After introducing the sounds of each language, the class studies and applies the rules of pronunciation through oral drills and transcription of song texts.

An introduction to compositional technique through the study of text setting, 20th-century compositional techniques, and analysis of selected compositions. One half-hour lesson per week is required.

Prerequisites
MUS 102 and MUS 104

A study of compositional technique through the study of musical form (binary form, ternary form, and the dance suite), style, performing forces, 20th-century compositional techniques including twelve-tone technique, and analysis of selected compositions. One half-hour lesson per week is required.

Prerequisites
MUS 237

Class instruction in playing and teaching instrumental music at a beginning level in preparation for teaching in schools. Study of beginning level methods, materials, and literature for solo and ensemble instruments are included.

Prerequisites
MUS 102 and 104.

Class instruction in playing and teaching instrumental music at a beginning level in preparation for teaching in schools. Study of beginning level methods, materials, and literature for solo and ensemble instruments are included.

Prerequisites
MUS 102 and 104.

Class instruction in playing and teaching instrumental music at a beginning level in preparation for teaching in schools. Study of beginning level methods, materials, and literature for solo and ensemble instruments are included.

Prerequisites
MUS 102 and 104.

Class instruction in playing and teaching instrumental music at a beginning level in preparation for teaching in schools. Study of beginning level methods, materials, and literature for solo and ensemble instruments are included.

Prerequisites
MUS 102 and 104.

Class instruction in playing and teaching instrumental music at a beginning level in preparation for teaching in schools. Study of beginning level methods, materials, and literature for solo and ensemble instruments are included.

Prerequisites
MUS 102 and 104. Must be taken concurrently with MUS 394.

Class instruction in playing and teaching instrumental music at a beginning level in preparation for teaching in schools. Study of beginning level methods, materials, and literature for solo and ensemble instruments are included.

Prerequisites
MUS 102 and 104. Must be taken concurrently with MUS 393.

This course provides the basics of vocal technique, diction and pedagogy for the music educator. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic vocal skills and pedagogical concepts leading to a better understanding of the voice. Specific problems often encountered by choral directors are also discussed.

Prerequisites
Must be taken concurrently with MUS 291 or 293.

The course provides a focus on accompanying skills for the music classroom on both keyboard and fretted instruments. The skills development is complimented by the study of teaching methods and laboratory experiences in class and in the school.

Prerequisites
Basic piano skills (keyboard skills are assessed prior to enrolling).

This is a semester-long (15 weeks) undergraduate course. The central focus of this class is the study and practice of the fundamentals of jazz. In addition to the study of jazz curriculum and instruction in K-12 public schools, this course includes a lab portion in which students will practice jazz performance skills on their main and secondary instruments, study form and score analysis, arrange beginning level jazz tunes, observe public school jazz classes, and read and discuss issues in jazz education related to diversity, equity, and inclusion in the jazz classroom. All music majors and minors who play an instrument or sing are welcome; alternate assignments will be given to non-music education majors.

Prerequisites
MUS 101 and 103.

This course provides students with knowledge of and hands-on practice with the basics of working in a recording studio, including acquiring knowledge of studio set up and the essentials of recording music digitally.

Prerequisites
MUS 101 and 103.

Designed for Applied Music students admitted to the Performance degree or other Applied Music students with written permission from the Director of the School of Music. One hour-long or two half-hour lessons per week required. May be repeated for credit. Registration for lessons is throughthe Music office prior to university registration.

Designed for Applied Music students admitted to the Performance degree or other Applied Music students with written permission from the Director of the School of Music. One hour-long or two half-hour lessons per week required. May be repeated for credit. Registration for lessons is throughthe Music office prior to university registration.

Prepares and performs music of many styles. Makes public appearances throughout the year and tours in the Pacific Northwest.

Prerequisites
Audition Required.

Prepares and performs varied repertoire for mixed voices. Makes public appearances throughout the year and tours in the Pacific Northwest.

Prerequisites
Audition Required.

Preparation and performance of works for symphony orchestra. Makes public appearances throughout the year. Tours in the Pacific Northwest.

Prerequisites
Audition Required.

An all-university group for mixed voices. Local performances are scheduled each semester.

Selected by audition from the Adelphian Concert Choir, Voci d'Amici is a select, vocal chamber ensemble dedicated to the performance of repertoire from all musical epochs. The ensemble is self-conducted.

Prerequisites
Audition Required.

An auditioned ensemble of women singing both accompanied and a capella literature and appearing in concert several times each semester.

Prerequisites
Audition Required.

This course familiarizes pianists with the skills required of a collaborative/ensemble pianist. Depending on the semester, music is selected from song literature, opera, choral, instrumental, and concerto accompaniments. Discussion of specific skills and techniques required for effective collaboration and accompaniment are emphasized. The course focus is primarily on skill-building and practical experience in rehearsal and performance. Students focus on sight-reading, transposition, navigating orchestral reductions, reading choral scores, and coaching of student performances.

Prepares and performs music of many jazz styles for both large bands and small combos. The jazz band plays concerts throughout the year, both on and off campus.

Prerequisites
Audition Required.

An all-university ensemble for brass, woodwind, and percussion. Performs on campus each semester.

An introduction to the basic elements of instrumental conducting, including: basic conducting technique, preparatory beats, patterns, cues, fermatas, and 4-part score reading. Class time is spent in lecture, discussion, demonstration, and skill refinement. Students conduct an ensemble consisting of class members during regular videotaped conducting labs, with formal and informal evaluation given by the instructor.

An introduction to the basic elements of choral conducting, including: basic conducting technique, preparatory beats, patterns, cues, fermatas, and 4-part score reading. Class time is spent in lecture, discussion, demonstration, and skill refinement. Students conduct an ensemble consisting of class members during regular videotaped conducting labs, with formal and informal evaluation given by the instructor.

An exploration of musical language and form, with emphasis on the primary forms of the Baroque, Classical, and Romantic eras, and the melodic and harmonic language of music of the twentieth century. Topics include the Baroque dance suite, sonata form, rondo form, continuous and sectional variations, concerto, pitch-class set theory, and twelve-tone operations, with focus on detailed aural and written analysis.

Prerequisites
MUS 202 and 204 or permission of the instructor.

Music majors attend 10 concerts, on or off campus, and submit printed programs and reflections at the end of the semester. Required of all music majors.

For Applied Music students other than Performance majors. One half-hour lesson per week is required. The choice of materials is left to the discretion of the instructors in each applied music area. In the jury examination given at the end of the term, students are required to perform excerpts from the material studied. Registration forlessons is administered through the Music office.

Prerequisites
Previous music experience; audition required.

For Applied Music students other than Performance majors. One half-hour lesson per week is required. The choice of materials is left to the discretion of the instructors in each applied music area. In the jury examination given at the end of the term, students are required to perform excerpts from the material studied. Registration forlessons is administered through the Music office.

Prerequisites
Previous music experience; audition required.

The preparation and performance of works for the musical stage.

Prerequisites
Audition Required.

An introduction to some of the music traditions that hail from South Asia, including those from India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, and their diasporas. The course covers concert and classical traditions, as well as ritual, popular, and folk musics, in which movement and theater both figure.

Code
Knowledge, Identity, and Power

In this course we will study traditions of dance from among world cultures. "Dance" in this course is considered broadly, and refers to performance, ritual, and daily-life practices of movement, with inextricable connections with music, sound, and theater. The course approaches contents from the disciplines anthropology, ethnomusicology, dance studies, and performance studies, and focuses on the study of movement and dance and their complex intersections with culture, daily life, and society. The course will be presented through a variety of teaching styles and assignments, including lectures, group participation, structured media engagement, and hands-on demonstrations/performances.

A racial and political category, Asian America is a term that indicates ethnic, linguistic, and cultural heterogeneity. In this course, we will explore Asian America through its many "performances" in and through the United States. Using the discipline of performance studies as our vantage point, in which all human actions and behaviors can be considered "performances" of some kind, we will explore how Asian America is constructed, maintained, and how it evolves. Each week will feature a particular category of performance, with case studies on food ways, fashion blogging, queer nightlife, music, dance, and archives, among communities of Chinese, Japanese, Cambodian, Filipino, and Pakistani Americans, and others.

Prerequisites
Recommended: a course in Musicology and Ethnomusicology at the 200-level.

An on-site experience in a school music classroom or music business, providing the student with pre-professional opportunities to observe and participate in school music and music business programs. Term project and journal required. Applications are due into the School of Music early in the semester preceding registration.

Every opera's characters and situations reflect the times and societies in which they were created, and in performances decades or centuries later, they continue to adapt to reflect changing circumstances. A few operas go further, actually portraying people and events plucked from the history books, or even the headlines. This course considers a selection of operas "based on a true story." What is the true story, as far as we can discern? Who transformed the event into words, music, sets, costumes, and movement onstage? What decisions did they make, and how do those decisions serve to interpret the historical event? How do works and productions reflect, or at times subvert, societal power structures involving class, race, gender, and nationality? How have productions changed over time to reflect shifting attitudes about their subject matter? And what are the ethical and political implications of turning historical events into prestigious aesthetic objects?

Prerequisites
Sophomore standing or permission of instructor.
Code
Humanistic Approaches

A survey of music history of the classical and popular traditions from World War I to the present and an introduction to world music. Topics include the legacy of modernism, neoclassicism, the post World War II avant-garde, postmodernism, jazz and popular music, and representative non-Western traditions. The class includes detailed analytical, historical, and critical study of representative works through lectures, class discussions, writing assignments, and directed listening.

Prerequisites
MUS 102 and 104 or instructor permission.

An introduction to jazz theory and improvisation through the study of selected compositions with emphasis on musical analysis, transcription, and performance. Laboratory required.

Prerequisites
MUS 202 and 204 or permission of the instructor.

A study of compositional technique through the study of musical form (rondo and sonata form), style, performing forces, 20th-century compositional techniques, and analysis of selected compositions. One hour lesson per week is required.

Prerequisites
MUS 238

A study of compositional technique through the study of extended instrumental and vocal techniques, indeterminacy and aleatory, style, performing forces, 20th-century compositional techniques, and analysis of selected compositions. One hour lesson per week is required.

Prerequisites
MUS 337

An introduction to the music industry and to the treatment of music as a commodity. Topics include music publishing, licensing, copyright and intellectual property, artist management, concert promotion, music unions, merchandising, arts administration, the non-profit sector, the digital revolution, and the recording industry.

Basic concepts of piano techniques and musicianship, and their demonstration in the teaching studio. Selection of teaching materials from method courses for beginning students to repertoire for advanced pianists. Emphasis on creating teaching situations, student demonstration. Survey of well-known piano literature for interpretive guidelines and pedagogical application.

An introduction to the pedagogy of string teaching (violin, viola, `cello, and double bass) as it applies to individual and small group instruction (i.e.: the private studio.)

Prerequisites
One year of string instrument instruction at the college level or permission of the instructor.

A study of the singing voice. This includes the structures, mechanics, and acoustics involved in the production of a sung tone, as well as practical methods for developing the voice and correcting vocal faults.

Prerequisites
Permission of the instructor.

Designed for Applied Music students admitted to the Performance degree or other Applied Music students with written permission from the Director of the School of Music. One hour-long or two half-hour lessons per week required. May be repeated for credit. Registration for lessons is throughthe Music office prior to university registration.

Designed for Applied Music students admitted to the Performance degree or other Applied Music students with written permission from the Director of the School of Music. One hour-long or two half-hour lessons per week required. May be repeated for credit. Registration for lessons is throughthe Music office prior to university registration.

Music for small vocal and instrumental ensembles.

Prepares and performs music of many styles. Makes public appearances throughout the year and tours in the Pacific Northwest.

Prerequisites
Audition Required.

Prepares and performs varied repertoire for mixed voices. Makes public appearances throughout the year and tours in the Pacific Northwest.

Prerequisites
Audition Required.

Preparation and performance of works for symphony orchestra. Makes public appearances throughout the year. Tours in the Pacific Northwest.

Prerequisites
Audition Required.

An all-university group for mixed voices. Local performances are scheduled each semester.

Selected by audition from the Adelphian Concert Choir, Voci d'Amici is a select, vocal chamber ensemble dedicated to the performance of repertoire from all musical epochs. The ensemble is self-conducted.

Prerequisites
Audition Required.

An auditioned ensemble of women singing both accompanied and a capella literature and appearing in concert several times each semester.

Prerequisites
Audition Required.

This course familiarizes pianists with the skills required of a collaborative/ensemble pianist. Depending on the semester, music is selected from song literature, opera, choral, instrumental, and concerto accompaniments. Discussion of specific skills and techniques required for effective collaboration and accompaniment are emphasized. The course focus is primarily on skill-building and practical experience in rehearsal and performance. Students focus on sight-reading, transposition, navigating orchestral reductions, reading choral scores, and coaching of student performances.

Prepares and performs music of many jazz styles for both large bands and small combos. The jazz band plays concerts throughout the year, both on and off campus.

Prerequisites
Audition Required.

An all-university ensemble for brass, woodwind, and percussion. Performs on campus each semester.

Advanced study of choral conducting techniques, emphasizing strategies for choral pedagogy, vocal warm-ups, advanced meters, and recitative. Class time is spent in lecture, discussion, demonstration, and skill refinement. Students conduct an ensemble consisting of class members during regular videotaped conducting labs, with formal and informal evaluation given by the instructor. Once a week, students conduct a lab ensemble consisting of music education majors, providing an opportunity for the exploration of choral repertoire and rehearsal techniques.

Advanced study of instrumental conducting techniques, emphasizing strategies for instrumental pedagogy, transposition, score reading, score study, analysis, and aural translation of the printed page. Class time is spent in lecture, discussion, demonstration, and skill refinement. Students conduct an ensemble consisting of class members during regular videotaped conducting labs, with formal and informal evaluation given by the instructor. Once a week, students conduct a lab ensemble consisting of music education majors, providing an opportunity for the exploration of band, orchestra and jazz repertoire and rehearsal techniques. The culminating exam includes conducting a university ensemble in rehearsal and concert.

An introduction to foundations of music education with emphasis on junior high and high school band, choir, orchestra, and jazz programs. This course explores theories of learning as applied to music and of teaching as a career. Topics include development of skills in curriculum building, lesson planning, comprehensive musicianship, reflective teaching and inquiry in music education. Practicum teaching and observing within school music programs is included throughout the semester.

Code
Knowledge, Identity, and Power

A study and practice of general music curriculum and instruction in elementary and middle schools. Students develop teaching goals, strategies, and lessons for singing, playing instruments, listening, composing, improvising, music reading, analyzing, and creative movement. Practicum teaching and observing within elementary school music programs is included throughout the semester.

Prerequisites
MUS 201 and 203.

This comprehensive instructional course provides participants with research-based methods to implement a popular music ensemble that incorporates performance, composition, improvisation, informal learning, and Music as a Second Language. Those interested in the teaching and learning of popular music are given the tools to inform their own their own craft of teaching, composing, songwriting, or performance through Modern Band instruments including guitar, bass, drums, keyboards, vocals, and technology. By focusing on genres of music such as rock, reggae, country, pop and hip hop, Popular Music Pedagogies engages students in making music through informal learning methods. No prior experience playing Modern Band instruments is necessary to successfully participate in this course.

Prerequisites
MUS 101 and 103, or permission of the instructor.

Composition of sixteenth- and eighteenth-century polyphony in two, three, and four parts. Topics include the sixteenth-century genres of motet, madrigal, canzonet, fantasia, and the eighteenth-century genres of chorale prelude, invention, and fugue. Students complete and present original contrapuntal compositions.

Prerequisites
MUS 202 and 204 or permission of the instructor.

This course includes study of the ranges, techniques, and timbres of each orchestral instrument and addresses common issues associated with scoring for instruments in combination. Topics include arranging music for string ensemble, woodwind ensemble, brass ensemble, percussion ensemble, band, and orchestra. There are listening exams on orchestral literature and on aural recognition of various instrumental timbres both in solo settings and in combination with other instruments. Additionally, students create an original orchestral composition.

Prerequisites
MUS 202 and 204 or permission of the instructor.

For Applied Music students other than Performance majors. One half-hour lesson per week is required. The choice of materials is left to the discretion of the instructors in each applied music area. In the jury examination given at the end of the term, students are required to perform excerpts from the material studied. Registration forlessons is administered through the Music office.

Prerequisites
Previous music experience; audition required.

For Applied Music students other than Performance majors. One half-hour lesson per week is required. The choice of materials is left to the discretion of the instructors in each applied music area. In the jury examination given at the end of the term, students are required to perform excerpts from the material studied. Registration forlessons is administered through the Music office.

Prerequisites
Previous music experience; audition required.

Preparation for a formal public recital usually presented by a junior or senior performance major. May be repeated.

In-depth analysis and application of advanced compositional techniques including pitch-class set theory, serialism, extended vocal and instrumental techniques, and advanced rhythmic devices. One hour lesson per week is required.

Prerequisites
MUS 338

Introduction to elements and techniques of electroacoustic music, including MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface), synthesis, sampling, and stereo and multitrack audio. One hour lesson per week is required.

Prerequisites
MUS 437

Designed for Applied Music students admitted to the Performance degree or other Applied Music students with written permission from the Director of the School of Music. One hour-long or two half-hour lessons per week required. May be repeated for credit. Registration for lessons is throughthe Music office prior to university registration

Designed for Applied Music students admitted to the Performance degree or other Applied Music students with written permission from the Director of the School of Music. One hour-long or two half-hour lessons per week required. May be repeated for credit. Registration for lessons is throughthe Music office prior to university registration

A selected musicological topic is studied in a seminar format. Emphasis is given to cultural and stylistic issues and to methods and techniques of musicological research, analysis, and writing. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites
MUS 102 and 104 and sophomore standing, MUS 233 and 234, or permission of instructor.

Guided thesis in musicology. Topic and scope to be arranged between the student and faculty thesis advisor.

Prerequisites
MUS 233 and instructor permission.

Independent study is available to those students who wish to continue their learning in an area after completing the regularly offered courses in that area.

Prerequisites
Permission of the instructor and the Director of the School of Music.

Independent study is available to those students who wish to continue their learning in an area after completing the regularly offered courses in that area.

Prerequisites
Permission of the instructor and the Director of the School of Music.

Designed to provide music business students with on-the-job experience with participating businesses. The student works with a faculty advisor to develop an individualized learning plan that connects the internship site experience to study in the major. The learning plan includes required reading, writing assignments, and a culminating project or paper. Registration is through Career and Employment Services.

Prerequisites
MUS 341, permission of the Director of the School of Music, and approval of the Internship Coordinator.