This course is intended to introduce the student to readingand critiquing original research in exercise science. The students will lead discussions, write ab-stracts and learn lab writing skills. An emphasis on common statistical techniques and terms will beexplored as they pertain to collecting data on human subjects.

Prerequisites
MATH 160 with a grade of C or higher.

This course studies the functions of the different human systems including endocrine, muscular, nervous, circulatory, respiratory and others.

Prerequisites
BIOL 111, CHEM 110 or 115, and EXSC 222, all with grades of C or higher, or permission of instructor.

This course presents a systemic approach to studying the human body. This includes microscopic and gross anatomy of the circulatory, digestive, endocrine, muscular, skeletal systems and others.

Prerequisites
BIOL 111 with a grade of C or higher, or permission of instructor.

This course provides a laboratory research experience for sophomores under the direction of a faculty member. Students may initiate a project or join a research project in the mentor's lab. Student and mentor fill out a department contract. A written research paper and a reflective summary of the research experience must be submitted for a final grade.

Prerequisites
BIOL 111, CHEM 110, MATH 160 and instructor permission.

This course provides students with the basic concepts of nutrition and exercise as they relate to health and the prevention of disease. The functions of the six essential nutrients are explored in detail with attention to their roles in metabolism, optimal health, and chronic diseases. The energy values of food and physical activity are quantified while undertaking an in-depth case study and written analysis of personal dietary intake and physical activity. Students read scientific literature, develop informed opinions, and debate controversial issues such as organically grown and genetically modified foods, and dietary supplements. Other potential topics include nutrition and dieting fads, advertising, weight control and obesity epidemic, sport nutrition, menu planning, and nutritional needs throughout the life cycle.

Prerequisites
BIOL 101 or 111 with a grade of C or higher.

This course provides students with hands-on laboratory experience in human cadaver dissection by expanding on content learned previously in Human Anatomy. With weekly direction from the instructor, students work in teams in the laboratory to dissect several regions of a human cadaver, which may include the muscles, nerves, and vessels of the limbs, thorax, and/or abdomen. Students may also focus on specialized areas of interest, such as a joint capsule, hand, or internal organ. Students will learn and practice proper safety practices, dissection technique, and cadaver care.

Prerequisites
EXSC 222 with a grade of B or higher; priority will be given to EXSC majors.

This introductory course explores the management of conditions limiting the functional capabilities of the physically active individual whose activities may range from occupational tasks to recreational sports. Information dealing with the prevention, recognition and management of these injuries or conditions is presented. Practical application of taping and bandaging techniques is also included.

Prerequisites
Students who have transfer credit for EXSC 327 or EXSC 32X may not take this course.

This course explores the role of the nervous system in controlling movement and learning coordinated motor tasks such as locomotion and physical activity. A survey of the nervous system and sensorimotor control set the stage for an exploration of topics such as neuromuscular activation and neuromotor control, neuromuscular fatigue, neuroendocrine regulation, endurance and strength training adaptations of the nervous system, and the neuromuscular responses to decreased activity. Other current topics such as the activity-dependent expression of neurotrophic factors and their effects on neurorehabilitation may be explored.

Prerequisites
EXSC 200 or 270, 221, and 222. NRSC 201 is recommended.

This course explores the body's acute responses and long-term adaptations to various levels of exercise and modes of activities. Students focus on understanding how the body's bioenergetic, cardiovascular, respiratory, neuromuscular, and endocrine systems respond to the physiological stress of exercise and how physical activity and exercise training affect health, disease, and the quality of life. Throughout the course, variations in responses between gender and age groups are considered. Lecture and laboratory topics include bioenergetics, cardiorespiratory and neuromuscular function, ergometry, fatigue, body composition, growth and maturation, inactivity, morbidity and costs to the nation, and other current topics. Formal laboratory reports and a review of literature are required.

Prerequisites
EXSC 200 or 270, 221, and 222.

This seminar reviews the requirements for energy macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids), micronutrients (vitamins and minerals), and fluid intake as well as basic principles of digestion and absorption. The regulations on the sale of dietary supplements in the US is discussed and debated. The specific ergogenic aids covered in the course are determined by the interests of the students in consultation with the instructor. Groups of two or three students works together to locate, select, and lead discussion/presentations of primary research studies that address their topics of interest,. Each student also designs a diet plan for a specific athlete and presents the plan to the class.

Prerequisites
EXSC 221, 222, and 301.

This class is a writing-intensive experience that is de-signed for those students who anticipate submitting an application for summer research, completinga senior thesis and or continuing to graduate school. The writing includes an application for approv-al from the Institutional Review Board, a grant proposal, an article written from provided data, and aposter presentation. Both peer and faculty review the written submissions. Each student will presenttheir results in a poster format.

Prerequisites
At least two of the following with grade C- or higher: EXSC 301, 328, 329, 336, or concurrent enrollment or permission of instructor.

This course explores a qualitative and quantitative approach to human movement.Functional anatomy and kinematics are explored. Students may be exposed to a variety of biomechani-cal equipment including motion analysis, force plate, EMG, isokinetic dynamometers, and others.Each student will complete a review of literature and an analysis of a human motion.

Prerequisites
EXSC 200, EXSC 222 with a grade C- or higher, and PHYS 111 with a grade C or higher.

This course provides a laboratory research experience for juniors under the direction of a faculty member. Students may initiate a project or join a research project in the mentor's lab. Student and mentor fill out a department contract. A written research paper, a reflective summary of the research experience, and an oral or poster presentation must be submitted for a final grade.

Prerequisites
BIOL 111, CHEM 110, MATH 160 and instructor permission.

This course explores the role of dietary factors inhealth and disease in greater depth and with more critical analyses of current scientific literature.Course topics may include the role of phytochemicals, nutrigenomics, the female athlete triad, eat-ing disorders, hydration and thermoregulation, macronutrient intake, weight loss diets, food-borneillness and safety of the food supply, clinical dietetics, and other current topics. Students will work insmall collaborations to identify a relevant question, research the literature, and design and completea research thesis. Laboratory experiences include resting metabolism, substrate utilization duringrest and exercise, measuring nutrient-related blood markers such as glucose, hemoglobin A1C, andlipoproteins, and conducting original research for theses.

Prerequisites
EXSC 200 or 270, 221, 222, and 301.

This course explores the cellular and molecular mechanisms related to neuroplasticity. Topics such as Alzheimer's, stroke, Parkinson's, muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, aging, spinal cord injury, and others will be discussed. Up-to-date molecular and cellular findings from the topics listed above and their effects on our understanding of neuroplasticity and/or neurorehabilitation will be explored.

Prerequisites
EXSC 200 or 270, 221, and 222. NRSC 201 is recommended.

This course explores in greater depth and breadth the role of the nervous system in the coordination of physiological systems that support physical activity and exercise. Factors that influence the neural control of motor output and/or cognition such as traumatic injuries to the neural tissue, disease states, microgravity, increased activity, inactivity, and aging are considered in depth. Topics include the autonomic regulation of blood flow, neurotrophic factors effects on motor and cognitive functions, activity-dependent plasticity of the nervous system and neurorehabilitatin, and alterations in sensorimotor control. Laboratory experiments utilize cellular, molecular, and histochemical techniques to assess changes in skeletal muscle and neural properties using models of increased and decreased activity. Students work in small collaborations to identify a relevant question, research the literature, and design and complete a research thesis.

Prerequisites
EXSC 328. NRSC 201 is recommended.

This course explores in greater breadth and depth the body's acute responses and long-term adaptations to exercise. Students read original research to explore the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which physical activity and exercise training affect health and chronic disease. Environmental challenges to human activity caused by heat, cold, altitude, hyperbaric conditions, and microgravity are investigated in lectures and/or laboratories. Topics also may include the endocrine control of substrate metabolism, biochemical markers of fitness and metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis, plasticity of muscle fiber types, and cardiovascular dynamics and autonomic regulation of blood flow, fluid homeostasis, and others. Students will work in small collaborations to identify a relevant question, research the literature, and design and complete a research thesis.

Prerequisites
EXSC 329

This course is structured to the expertise and research interests of the professor. Each topic is unique and encompasses a current issue in the field of exercise science. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites
At least two of the following with grade C- or higher: EXSC 301, 328, 329, 336, or concurrent enrollment or permission of instructor.

A scientific foundation of the study of human motion will be exploredas it relates to the integration of concepts and principles from biology and physics. The mechanicalbasis of human motion as it relates to the force-motion interaction, the motor system, and the adapt-ability of the motor system will be investigated. The student will become familiar with the equip-ment commonly used in biomechanics including force platforms, motion analysis, electromyographyand isokinetic strength testing.

Prerequisites
PHYS 111 or 121, EXSC 336, or permission of the instructor.

Participation, performance, and satisfaction in sport and exercise are mediated by social structures, as well as individual psychological traits and states. This seminar examines how psychological and social variables affect learning and performance in all types of physical activity, including leisure recreation, fitness, physical education classes, and competitive sport. Emphasis is placed on integrating sound theory with useful practical applications. Students examine how to implement psychological skills training for peak sport performance, how to create positive social climates, and how emerging sport and exercise trends shape the future.

Prerequisites
MATH 160, AP Statistics, or equivalent. Students who have EXSC 437 transfer credit may not take this course.

This course will focus on designing pro-grams intended to improve performance or quality of life with special populations. The student willperform a semester long project designing a complete program for a specific client. The student maychoose an elite athlete or disease model intended to improve performance or health. A backgroundin nutrition, exercise physiology, biomechanics and neuroscience will help lay the foundation fora well rounded program intended to address all aspects of the individual. Diet, agility, balance,strength, aerobic, anaerobic training, as well as the combination of training effects will be explored.Contraindications to exercise will also be examined as they relate to health.

Prerequisites
Must have completed three of the following: EXSC 301, 328, 329, 336.

This course is designed to study the mechanical bases of musculoskeletal injury, to better understand the mechanisms that seem to cause injury, the effect injury has on the musculoskeletal structures, and hopefully, to study how injury may be prevented. Many different types of injury will be discussed with the students responsible for leading these discussions. Students will write a review article on an injury condition and present their findings to the class.

Prerequisites
EXSC 336 or permission of instructor.

Students work in small collaborations to identify a relevant scientific question, research the literature, and design and complete a research thesis written in the format of a journal style manuscript. The specific topic(s) of the course vary by semester based upon the research expertise of the faculty instructor assigned to the course, and may include topics in either biomechanics, neuromuscular physiology, exercise physiology, or nutrition. Lecture sessions focus on primary research within the expertise of the faculty instructor and students participate by leading and taking part in lectures and discussions. Laboratory experiences include reviewing techniques from prerequisite courses and acquiring new skills required to propose and conduct original research, and present results in oral and written formats.

Prerequisites
EXSC 301, 328, 329, and 336.

This course provides a laboratory research experience for seniors under the direction of a faculty member. Students may initiate a project or join a research project in the mentor's lab.Student and mentor fill out a department contract. A written research paper, a reflective summary of the research experience, and an oral or poster presentation must be submitted for a final grade.

Prerequisites
BIOL 111, CHEM 110, MATH 160 and instructor permission.

Experimental research is performed under the guidance and in the area of expertise of a faculty member that may include specialized topics in kinesiology/biomechanics, exercise physiology, nutrition and physical activity. Students must write a proposal that is approved by the department and the Institutional Review Board, carry out the research, write the thesis, and orally defend it at a research symposium. Application details can be obtained from the Junior Research Seminar instructor, faculty research advisor, or department chair.

Prerequisites
EXSC 331 and permission of department.

Research under the close supervision of a faculty memberon a topic agreed upon. Application and proposal to be submitted to the department chair and re-search advisor. Recommended for majors prior to the senior research semester.

Prerequisites
Junior or Senior standing, EXSC major, and permission of department chair.

Among the requirements in this seminar is the completion of 120 hours of field experience at a site prearranged in consultation with the internship coordinator in Academic and Career Advising. The seminar provides students the context to reflect on concrete experiences at the site and link them to study in their disciplines as well as the political, psychological, social, economic and intellectual forces that shape views on work and its meaning. The aim is to integrate the liberal arts with issues and themes surrounding the pursuit of a good and productive life. In certain pre-approved instances, an individualized learning plan with a faculty sponsor may substitute for the seminar.

Prerequisites
Junior or senior standing, 2.5 GPA, ability to complete 120 hours at internship site, approval of the CES internship coordinator, and completion of learning agreement.

Among the requirements in this seminar is the completion of 120 hours of field experience at a site prearranged in consultation with the internship coordinator in Academic and Career Advising. The seminar provides students the context to reflect on concrete experiences at the site and link them to study in their disciplines as well as the political, psychological, social, economic and intellectual forces that shape views on work and its meaning. The aim is to integrate the liberal arts with issues and themes surrounding the pursuit of a good and productive life. In certain pre-approved instances, an individualized learning plan with a faculty sponsor may substitute for the seminar.