First-Year Advising Classes, Fall 2017

Advising Placement Questionnaire, Question 11

Important Note: The following offerings are current as of March 15, 2017. Changes to these offerings may occur, and will be reflected in choices available online through Puget Sound's advising class selection tool. Residential seminars (seminars whose students live together on the same floor of a residence hall) are denoted as "RS" in the course title.

African American Studies 101: Introduction to African American Studies
(Professor Renee Simms)
This course provides an examination of intellectual and creative productions, developments, and events that have come to be recognized as the discipline of African American Studies. The course explores literature, history, popular culture (music, television, magazines, newspapers, movies, film documentaries), and politics as a way to identify the historical and political origins and objectives of Black Studies and the 1960s Black Liberation struggles, the early academic and social concerns of Black Studies advocates, the theoretical and critical approaches to Black Studies as a discipline, and the early objectives of Black Studies in relation to present goals of multiculturalism. Satisfies Humanistic Approaches core requirement.

Art History 278: Survey of Asian Art
(Professor Zaixin Hong)
This course is a survey of the major artistic traditions of Asia, primarily of China, India, and Japan, from prehistoric times to the turn of the 20th century. It examines important monuments and emphasizes the interaction of art and society, specifically, how different artistic styles are tied to different intellectual beliefs, geographical locations, and other historical contexts. The course includes a field trip to the Seattle Asian Art Museum. Satisfies Artistic Approaches core requirement.

Art Studio 101: Visual Concepts I
(Professor Janet Marcavage)
This course introduces the formal, perceptual, and expressive elements that form the basis for drawing and two-dimensional design. This course addresses the notion of drawing and design as interrelated aspects of a shared visual language. The course focuses on using this language as a means of developing ideas, heightening perceptual awareness, and honing technical skills. Various methods, techniques, and materials are explored.

Asian Languages and Cultures – see Chinese 101 and Japanese 101

Biology 111: Unity of Life: Cells, Molecules, and Systems
(Professor Alyce DeMarais) (Professor Andreas Madlung)
This course is designed primarily for potential biology majors and health science students, and offers a contemporary approach to the major themes of modern biology. Sub-cellular, cellular, genetic, and physiological aspects of biological systems are explored in the context of the scientific process. Satisfies Natural Scientific Approaches core requirement.
NOTE:
In this and most other laboratory science classes, students meet for a common lecture and then separate into smaller groups for laboratory activity. Students selecting this class for first-year advising purposes may be assigned to either of the lab sections reserved for advisees.

Biology 112: Evolution and the Diversity of Life
(Professor Peter Hodum)
This lecture/laboratory course explores the mechanisms of evolution and the vast diversity of life to which it gave rise. The characteristics that define different groups of organisms, and the evolutionary relationships among these groups are explored. Structure and function relationships are emphasized throughout the course. Laboratory is required. Some labs involve the dissection of plants, animals, and fungi. Some labs may involve the collection and sacrificing of zooplankton and insects, as well as the handling of plant and animal parts. The course is intended as the second-term course for biology majors and is an appropriate biology course for incoming first-year students who have Advanced Placement credit in biology. Prerequisite: Biology 111 or AP Biology score of 4 or5. Satisfies Natural Scientific Approaches core requirement.

Business 101: Business Leadership Seminar
(Professor Nila Wiese)
This course serves as the advising section for students enrolled in the Business Leadership Program (BLP). The Business Leadership Seminar meets 10–12 times per semester and offers the student an opportunity to network with representatives from regional businesses and to learn how they operate and about their strategies and positioning in the marketplace. Guest speakers in the Business Leadership Seminar also discuss careers in various business fields and functional areas. Speakers present information on current leadership topics and practices, and provide a perspective on the theories and tools studied in classes. Some seminars are devoted to the particular needs of a BLP class. Career assessment and leadership activities, as well as readings in business topics, are required.
NOTE: This special seminar is the first in a series of eight such classes required of all students selected for the Business Leadership Program. Students interested in applying for the program should contact the School of Business and Leadership (253.879.3153). Students already admitted to the BLP should make this their only advising class selection on the Advising Placement Questionnaire. Students choosing BUS 101 before formal admission to the program will be assigned to another class. Upon admission, they will be reassigned to BUS 101.

Chemistry 110: General Chemistry I
(Professor Amanda Mifflin) (Professor Dan Burgard)
This class is the first in an introductory two-semester sequence designed to give a solid introduction to chemical principles. The topics covered are atomic structure, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, atomic theory, bonding, intermolecular forces, phase changes, introduction to reactions, gases, and thermodynamics. The course is intended for science majors interested in chemistry, biology, geology, and physics, as well as those planning careers in medicine, dentistry, or engineering. Laboratory sections of the course are reserved for first-year student advising. Satisfies Natural Scientific Approaches core requirement.

Chemistry 115: Integrated Chemical Principles
(Professor Steven Neshyba)
This class is the first in a two-semester, introductory chemistry accelerated sequence open to well-prepared students, particularly those planning to major in the molecular sciences (chemistry, biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology) or students planning careers in medicine, dentistry, or engineering. Topics include nuclear chemistry, atomic structure, stoichiometry, bonding, intermolecular forces and phase changes, reactions, gases, inorganic chemistry, thermochemistry, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Satisfies Natural Scientific Approaches core requirement.

Chinese 101: Elementary Chinese
(Professor Lo Sun Perry)
Interested in Asian languages and cultures? An advising class in Chinese provides an opportunity both to learn the language in an interactive setting and also to participate in cultural excursions, technological enrichment, and cocurricular events. Students participate actively in class, which emphasizes aural and reading comprehension, writing, and especially speaking. Students interested in enrolling in Chinese 101 need not have previous knowledge of the language chosen; all 101-level language courses assume no prior knowledge of the language. Students with two years or more of high school language will be evaluated on an individual basis by the faculty and placed at an appropriate level. Students with any previous experience in a language should not be deterred from signing up for an advising section, even if they are concerned that the section offered is not at their level. Advisors will assist students in moving to a higher-level course during Orientation or anytime during the first four weeks of class, while keeping the same advising assignment.
NOTE: If you have questions about placement, or if you believe your background will be difficult to assess (either because of unusual coursework or experience abroad), you may phone either the Asian studies department (253.879.2995) or the Office of Academic Advising (253.879.3250) for a preliminary answer to your questions. In most cases, you will meet with an advisor to find an appropriate placement during Orientation Week or in the first week of classes.

Computer Science 161: Introduction to Computer Science
(Professor Brad Richards)
This course is an introduction to computer science and programming. The programming language Java is used to illustrate concepts in computer science. The course emphasizes the use of the computer as a problem-solving tool and the development of good programming style. CSCI 161 is the introductory course for students planning to major or minor in computer science. A weekly laboratory is required. Satisfies Mathematical Approaches core requirement.

Economics 101: Introduction to Markets and Macroeconomics
(Professor Garrett Milam) (Professor Lisa Nunn)
This is the first course in the economics two-semester introductory sequence. It introduces students to the market model and macroeconomics. Topics explored in the market model unit include supply and demand, incentives, opportunity cost and comparative advantage. Topics in macroeconomics include national income determination, inflation, unemployment, fiscal and monetary policy and key macroeconomic institutions. Satisfies Social Scientific Approaches core requirement.

French 235: The Paris Connection
(Professor Diane Kelley)
Interested in French language and culture? An advising course in French provides an opportunity both to learn the language in an interactive setting and also to participate in cultural excursions, technological enrichment, and cocurricular events. Through a contextualized exploration of Paris from historical and/or contemporary perspectives, students develop their language skills through intensive grammar review, vocabulary enhancement, written expression, and conversational fluency. The course aims to prepare students for upper-level French courses and study abroad by improving French written and oral fluency though a project-based approach, focusing on different aspects of Parisian life of interest to students, from artistic movements to fashion and food. Students with any previous experience in a language should not be deterred from signing up for an advising section, even if they are concerned that the section offered is not at their level. Advisors will assist students in moving to a higher-level course during Orientation or anytime during the first four weeks of class, while keeping the same advising assignment. Students with three or more years of high school language should enroll in the 201 level unless otherwise determined by faculty evaluation. Students with advanced preparation, including those who have taken Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate Higher Level courses, should enroll in courses above the intermediate level. Satisfies Foreign Language graduation requirement.
NOTE: If you have questions about placement, or if you believe your background will be difficult to assess (either because of unusual coursework or experience abroad), you may phone either the French studies department (253.879.3186) or the Office of Academic Advising (253.879.3250) for a preliminary answer to your questions. In most cases, you will meet with an advisor to find an appropriate placement during Orientation Week or in the first week of classes.

Geology 101: Physical Geology
(Professor Ken Clark)
Physical geology is a survey of the physical processes operating on and in the earth and the results of these processes through time. Topics covered range in scale from the atomic to the galactic. The formation of the minerals and lavas, types of volcanoes, and the creation of sedimentary and metamorphic rocks make up the first third of the course; this introduces the materials of the Earth. The course next covers large-scale topics such as the age of the Earth, earthquakes and their resultant damage, how continents and seafloors are created, a brief history of the world, and an outline of the great unifying theory of geology, plate tectonics. The last third of the course discusses how surface processes such as streams, wind, waves, and changes in the environment affect the deserts, glaciers, shorelines, and groundwater, and how these changes affect our way of life. Includes a laboratory. Credit for this course will not be granted for students who have received credit for GEOL 104. Satisfies Natural Scientific Approaches core requirement.

German 101: Elementary German
(Professor Kent Hooper)
Interested in German language and cultures? An advising class in German provides an opportunity to develop greater proficiency in the language; learn about the social, cultural, and political contexts of the countries in which this language is spoken; and participate in cultural activities and cocurricular events. This course uses interactive classroom and online laboratory practice to develop fundamental speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension skills in German. Advisors will assist students in moving to a higher-level course during Orientation or anytime during the first four weeks of class, while keeping the same advising assignment.
NOTE: If you have questions about placement, or if you believe your background will be difficult to assess (either because of unusual coursework or experience abroad), you may phone either the Department of German Studies (253.879.3186) or the Office of Academic Advising (253.879.3250) for a preliminary answer to your questions. In most cases, you will meet with an advisor to find an appropriate placement during Orientation Week or in the first week of classes.

German 201: Intermediate German
(Professor Kent Hooper)
Interested in German language and cultures? An advising class in German provides an opportunity to develop greater proficiency in the language; learn about the social, cultural, and political contexts of the countries in which this language is spoken; and participate in cultural activities and cocurricular events. German 201 develops proficiency in key areas essential for university study in Germany or Austria. German 202 takes students on a multimedia journey through three German-speaking cultures. Selective grammar review with emphasis on intermediate topics. Advisors will assist students in moving either to a lower- or a higher-level course during Orientation or anytime during the first four weeks of class, while keeping the same advising assignment. Satisfies Foreign Language graduation requirement.
NOTE: If you have questions about placement, or if you believe your background will be difficult to assess (either because of unusual coursework or experience abroad), you may phone either the Department of German Studies (253.879.3186) or the Office of Academic Advising (253.879.3250) for a preliminary answer to your questions. In most cases, you will meet with an advisor to find an appropriate placement during Orientation Week or in the first week of classes.

Honors Advising
Honors students will choose a section of SSI-1 195: The Scientific and Romantic Revolutions during Orientation, and advising will be coordinated through this class enrollment.
NOTE: Honors Program students are chosen by the Honors Committee. Any first-year student who is interested in the program and who has not already expressed that interest to the Office of Admission is encouraged to apply by writing to the Office of Admission, in care of the Honors Program.

International Political Economy 101: Introduction to International Political Economy
(Professor Brad Dillman)
This course provides a multidisciplinary introduction to the study of international social, political, and economic problems. Concepts, theories, and methods of analysis drawn from economics, history, political science, and sociology are developed and applied to enable students to understand broadly a number of relationships among states, markets, and societies at a global level. Satisfies Social Scientific Approaches core requirement.

Japanese 101: Elementary Japanese
(Professor Jan Leuchtenberger)
Interested in Asian languages and cultures? An advising class in Japanese provides an opportunity both to learn the language in an interactive setting and also to participate in cultural excursions, technological enrichment, and cocurricular events. Students participate actively in classes, which emphasize aural and reading comprehension, writing, and especially speaking. Students interested in enrolling in Japanese 101 need not have previous knowledge of the language chosen; all 101-level language courses assume no prior knowledge of the language. Students with two years or more of high school language will be evaluated on an individual basis by the faculty and placed at an appropriate level. Students with any previous experience in a language should not be deterred from signing up for an advising section, even if they are concerned that the section offered is not at their level. Advisors will assist students in moving to a higher-level course during Orientation or anytime during the first four weeks of class, while keeping the same advising assignment.
NOTE: If you have questions about placement, or if you believe your background will be difficult to assess (either because of unusual coursework or experience abroad), you may phone either the Asian studies department (253.879.2995) or the Office of Academic Advising (253.879.3250) for a preliminary answer to your questions. In most cases, you will meet with an advisor to find an appropriate placement during Orientation Week or in the first week of classes.

Latina/o Studies 200: Latina/o America – A Critical Introduction to Latina/o Studies
(Professor Oriel Siu)
The United States is the second largest Spanish-speaking country in the world. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this course explores the historical, social, political, and cultural configurations of this fact and of what has come to be known as Latina/o U.S.A. The course begins with a discussion on the roots of Spanish
in the Americas. What are the historical and colonial relations of power leading to the presence of Spanish speaking peoples and Latino cultures in the U.S.? In posing this question the course examines the nascent U.S. nation as a political and colonizing force throughout the 19th century; its politics of colonization towards Native Americans, Mestizos, and people of Spanish and African descent through the annexation of Florida (1819), the Mexican American War (1846-1848), and the Spanish-American War (1898). Departing from these moments, the course then interrogates ongoing U.S. border politics and U.S. empire building throughout the continent, further questioning the following: How do U.S. policies relate to the massive Latino migratory patterns during the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries? How do these shape the complexities of the Latina/o experience? Literature, film, historical accounts, and social science works serve to discuss the central issues of this course: migrations, racisms, language as a marginalizing and/or empowering tool, key political and social moments in the Latino experience, the entrenchment of neoliberal economic policies and immigration, deportations and U.S. immigration policies, Latino community building, gender practices, heterogeneities of Latino populations, and politics of identity. This course is taught in English. Cross-listed as LTS 200/SPAN 210. Satisfies Humanistic Approaches core requirement.

Mathematics 160: Introduction to Applied Statistics
(Professor Matt Pickard)
This course provides an introduction to statistics, concentrating on statistical concepts and the “why and when” of statistical methodology. The course focuses on learning to ask appropriate questions, collect data effectively, summarize and interpret information, and understand the limitations of statistical inference. Satisfies Mathematical Approaches core requirement.

Mathematics 180: Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
(Professor Alison Paradise)
There are two main topics in the calculus for functions of one variable: differentiation and integration. This course focuses on differentiation starting with limits and continuity, then introduces the derivative, and applications of the derivative, in a variety of contexts. The course concludes with an introduction to integration. The central ideas are explored from the symbolic, graphic, numeric, and physical model points of view. Satisfies Mathematical Approaches core requirement.

Mathematics 181: Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
(Professor Wendy Dove)
This course focuses on integration and its relation to differentiation. Topics include definite integrals, anti-derivatives, the Fundamental Theorems of Calculus, applications of integration, sequences, and series. The central ideas are explored from the symbolic, graphic, numeric, and physical model points of view. Satisfies Mathematical Approaches core requirement.
NOTE: Students who have taken a yearlong high school course in calculus (particularly those who have earned a score of 3 or better on the AP Calculus AB exam) are encouraged to begin college mathematics with Math 181.

Music 103: First-Year Theory
(Professor Gwynne Brown) (Professor Robert Hutchinson)
Designed to be taken together, Music 101 and 103 constitute the first semester of music theory required of all music majors and prospective music majors. Music 101 (Aural) includes development of skills in sight singing, melodic and harmonic dictation, transcription, and keyboard harmony to improve overall musicianship and comprehension of music theory and literature. Music 103 (Notation) includes an introduction to the fundamentals of music theory: scales, key signatures, intervals, triads, seventh chords, harmonic function and progression, four-part voice leading, and period forms. Also included is the creation of an original composition.
NOTE: Students planning or contemplating a major in music should be sure to perform an audition for the major (if one has not already been completed) and request First-Year Theory as one of their four advising class choices. Students considering a music major who have Advanced Placement credit for music theory should also request this advising class; a music advisor will assist them in determining an appropriate theory placement.

Occupational Therapy 101: Introduction to Allied Health Care Professions
(Professor George Tomlin) (Professor Kirsten Wilbur)
This nontraditional advising section (offered for .25 units of credit) is for students interested in exploring the fields of occupational therapy and physical therapy in addition to the liberal arts and sciences. There will be three major objectives in the course: 1) to define the roles and functions of occupational therapists and physical therapists in a variety of settings, 2) to explore current issues in U.S. health care delivery, and 3) to explore students’ alternative academic interests to ensure that their courses of study will be chosen in a well-informed and considered way.
NOTE: This course is not required for either the OT or the PT program, nor will it meet any requirements for those degrees.

Philosophy 101: Introduction to Philosophy
(Professor Shen-yi Liao)
Representative philosophical topics, such as mind and body, the grounds of knowledge, the existence of God, moral obligation, political equality, and human freedom, are discussed in connection with contemporary philosophers and figures in the history of philosophy. Satisfies Humanistic Approaches core requirement.

Physics 121: General University Physics
(Professor Greg Elliott)
This course addresses the fundamental principles and applications of mechanics, gravitation, and wave motion treated with the use of differential and integral calculus. Prerequisite or co-requisite: MATH 180 or equivalent. It is the first in a two-semester sequence intended primarily for prospective science majors and for those intending to pursue pre-engineering programs. The advising section will be affiliated with a laboratory group of this class. Satisfies Natural Scientific Approaches core requirement.

Politics and Government 101: Introduction to U.S. Politics
(Professor Robin Jacobson)
This course introduces students to the institutions and processes of U.S. politics. It covers all of the fundamental principles and important decision makers, giving to students the necessary breadth and understanding to take more advanced and more specialized courses. In addition, it prepares students to evaluate the guiding values of the polity, both in theory and in practice. Satisfies Social Scientific Approaches core requirement.

Politics and Government 103: Introduction to Theory: International Relations
(Professor Seth Weinberger)
What are the causes of war between states? What conditions help make peace more likely? Is the international distribution of economic assets just? Why is it so difficult to increase the amount of cooperation between states? What role can nonstates actors play in international politics? These are just some of the questions considered in this course. By focusing on the interaction of contemporary and historical international actors, including states, intergovernmental organizations, and nongovernmental organizations, this course examines the interplay of political, economic, social, and cultural factors that influence the international distribution of power and wealth and contribute to world conflict and cooperation. Specific areas of study include causes of interstate war, terrorism, economic globalization, and international law and organizations. Satisfies Social Scientific Approaches core requirement.

Psychology 101: Introductory Psychology
(Professor Tim Beyer) (Professor Melvin Rouse)
Humans are complex organisms, and psychology provides a rich, interdisciplinary understanding of the study of mental life, experience, and behavior. Through this course, students develop an appreciation for these complexities by focusing on individual and social behavior, as well as the physiological and neurological processes underlying them. Central to this course is an understanding of the diverse methods, experimental designs, foundational theories, and research used to inform the various subdisciplines in psychology. Topics frequently covered in this survey course include: research methods; sensation and perception; learning and memory; and developmental, personality, abnormal, and social psychology.

Religion 202: Introduction to the Study of World Religions
(Professor Jonathan Stockdale)
This course provides an introduction to the vocabulary, methods, and theoretical assumptions of the academic study of religion. By examining several diverse religious communities and traditions—including Lakota Sioux, Southern Pentecostal, Nation of Islam, and Zen Buddhist—students examine patterns, themes, and issues that scholars commonly encounter across world religions. Students also examine how specific communities give voice to themes found within the larger world religion from which they emerge. In each case, particular attention is paid to the role of religion in social justice and salvation movements, and in the formation of individual and group identities. Satisfies Humanistic Approaches core requirement.

NOTE: THE SEMINARS IN SCHOLARLY INQUIRY I (SSI-1) BELOW ARE ADVISING SEMINARS—STUDENTS WILL FULFILL TWO REQUIREMENTS (ADVISING AND SEMINAR) WITH ONE COURSE OF SSI-1.

SSI-1 103: Alexander the Great
(Professor William Barry)
Alexander the Great has been endlessly studied, celebrated, demonized, heroized, and satirized. Some have viewed him as a unifier of mankind, others as a destroyer of civilization. Who was Alexander the Great? What  are the realities behind the popular images? Through close reading and evaluation of primary sources and secondary literature, students develop a deep understanding of Alexander and his world and sharpen their skills of critical reading, writing, and research. Affiliate department: Classics.

SSI-1 122: Ecotopia? Landscape, History, and Identity in the Pacific Northwest
(Professor Doug Sackman)
In his novel Ecotopia, Ernest Callenbach envisioned Northern California, Oregon, and Washington separating from the USA to become a breakaway “green” republic. Using this vision of the Northwest as a sustainable society as a touchstone, this course explores the multifaceted relationship between human identity and landscape (or place) in the region over the last century. Probing historical documents, visual representations, and literature, students investigate how different peoples have encountered, experienced, and represented the environment in the Pacific Northwest and how, in turn, the environment has shaped their sense of who they are. Additional topics may include the wilderness idea, globalization, and the way that social divisions such as gender and race have intersected with the process of making and remaking places in the region. Affiliate department: History.

SSI-1 123: Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo – Lives of Art and Politics
(Professor John Lear)
During the first half of the 20th century, Diego Rivera was known as Mexico’s most famous and influential living artist, and Frida Kahlo was known mostly as his wife. Soon after their deaths in the mid-20th century, Kahlo became known as Mexico’s most famous and influential artist, and Rivera was known mostly as her husband. This first-year seminar examines Mexico’s most famous modern couple and their changing critical fortunes at three levels: biographical; artistic; and political. The questions the course asks and the answers pursued are informed by the disciplines of history, art history and the interdisciplinary endeavor of the humanities. Questions include: Who were these two individuals, and how were their lives as a couple shaped by socially constructed gender roles? What was the nature of their distinct artistic production, and how was the work of each shaped by gender and by the work of the other? How did they participate in the politics and the cultural movements following the 1910 Mexican Revolution, and how did “the revolution” shape their lives, art, and political roles? And finally, why did the life and art of Kahlo overshadow that of her husband after their deaths? Affiliate department: History.

SSI-1 126: Gender, Literacy, and International Development (RS)
(Professor Julie Christoph)
Everyone knows the saying, “If you give a man a fish, he will eat for a day. If you teach a man to fish, he will eat for a lifetime.” What if the “man” being taught is a woman? What if the “fishing” being learned is a form of literacy (whether alphabetic literacy, health literacy, or economic literacy)? For many reasons, women are disproportionately represented among the world’s poor and illiterate populations, and gender roles for both men and women contribute to social inequities, as well as possibilities for successful international development. Increasingly, development experts agree that efforts to reduce poverty must take into account cultural norms and gender roles—for both men and women—and that literacy education is key to this process. But what forms of literacy should be learned? Who should make the choice? How do rising literacy rates affect gender roles, religious traditions, health expectations, and resource usage? Students in this course engage in discussions of varied reading materials, including a novel, policy documents, theory about the effects and nature of literacy, and ethnographic studies of men and women engaged in literacy learning around the world. Through focusing on interdisciplinary perspectives on gender, literacy, and international development, students in this course begin developing intellectual habits necessary to write and speak effectively and with integrity in college. Affiliate department: English.

SSI-1 128: The Philosophy and Science of Human Nature
(Professor Sara Protasi)
Is there a universal human nature, and if so what defines it? For millennia now philosophers have debated this question, proposing a number of starkly different accounts of human nature in the process. More recently scientists have gotten in on the action as well, bringing empirical results to bear on various hypotheses regarding what human beings are like. This course examines the interaction between philosophical and scientific approaches to the study of human nature. Topics include the following: Which features of human minds are innate? What is the relation between the language a person speaks and the way in which that person conceptualizes the world? What does evolution entail about human nature? Is the existence of free will compatible with various scientific findings regarding human beings? What are the moral and political implications of different views of human nature? Do men and women have fundamentally different natures? What is the relation between human nature and religion? The course examines works by Aristotle, Hobbes, Rousseau, Marx, Darwin, and Mead, as well as many contemporary philosophers and scientists. Affiliate department: Philosophy.

SSI-1 133: Not Just Fun and Games: Sport and Society in the Americas
(Professor Michael Benveniste)
Many people turn to sport as an escape from the pressures and concerns of everyday life, a space apart from society’s daily grind. This course, however, explores the myriad ways that sport is enmeshed in the social world: the interplay of sports and sporting culture with sociopolitical conflict and ideology. Honing in on the three major sports of the Americas—baseball, soccer, and boxing—students examine the interaction of these sports with shifting historical and social contexts in order to query the role of identity, economy, class, and politics both on and off the field. Drawing on writings and films about sport, as well as sporting events themselves, students learn the rudiments of critical analysis and argumentation as they explore just how permeable are the boundaries between sport and society. Affiliate department: English.

SSI-1 134: Dreams and Desire – The Liminal World
(Professor Ann Putnam)
The theme of this course is the exploration of the liminal world—the terrain for which there is evidence but no proof. For example, what do religion, anthropology, philosophy, medicine, psychology, and literature have to say about the seen and the unseen, the threshold between life and death—issues that shoot to the core of human existence and exert the strongest hold on the human spirit? Students explore the validity of claims about belief and unbelief, the world beyond the senses, made by prophets, priests, poets, shamans, scientists, and philosophers. As both writers and speakers, students construct persuasive arguments based on an evaluation of sources that either contradict or defend given assumptions about the role of liminality in culture, history, identity, and the natural world. Students begin with texts that insist upon controversial readings, such as Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Louis Owen’s Wolfsong, and Isabel Allende’s The House of the Spirits. Affiliate department: English.

SSI-1 161: Social Order and Human Freedom
(Professor Richard Anderson-Connolly)
This seminar examines the apparent, and perhaps genuine, contradiction between the concepts of social order and individual freedom. An ordered society implies that people generally do what they are supposed to do when they are supposed to do it. Our casual observation of society confirms persistent patterns to human behavior. At the same time, however, most of us cling to the notion of our individual freedom and our legal system is indeed premised upon this assumption. The central question then is this: Are we truly free or do we simply follow the patterns our society has constructed for us? The relationship between the individual and society has captured the attention of some of the greatest sociologists, philosophers, historians, and literary figures. With only slight exaggeration one might say it is the central question of Western Civilization, especially since the Enlightenment. This course provides an introduction to this important area of human inquiry. Affiliate department: Sociology and Anthropology.

END OF ADVISING SEMINARS

Sociology and Anthropology 101: Introduction to Sociology
(Professor Jason Struna)
This course is designed to introduce students to the field of sociology. Sociology is a broad discipline which, at its core, constitutes the scientific study of society. Students in this course are exposed to basic concepts, theories, and methods used in modern sociology. Upon successful completion of Introduction to Sociology, students have a basic understanding of the sociological perspective and the ways in which the discipline frames human behavior at all levels, from a brief encounter of two strangers to global social systems. The course also provides students with specific sociological tools that they can use to better understand their world; the theories, concepts, and ideas covered in this class will help students to recognize the connection between self and society, biography and history, as well as the individual and social structures. Satisfies Social Scientific Approaches core requirement.

Spanish 201: Intermediate Spanish
(Professor Harry Velez-Quinones)
Interested in Spanish language and cultures? An advising class in Spanish provides an opportunity to develop greater proficiency in the language; learn about the social, cultural, and political contexts of the countries in which this language is spoken; and participate in cultural activities and cocurricular events. This course is a mid-level course for students seeking to perfect their command of Spanish. The course consists of oral and written assignments on a variety of topics chosen to increase the student’s control of the structures and vocabulary of the language. The course also includes a thorough review of grammar at a fairly advanced level. Usage of interactive web-based resources is an integral part of these courses. Advisors will assist students in moving either to a higher- or lower-level course during Orientation or anytime during the first four weeks of class, while keeping the same advising assignment. Satisfies Foreign Language graduation requirement.
NOTE: If you have questions about placement, or if you believe your background will be difficult to assess (either because of unusual coursework or experience abroad), you may phone either the Department of Hispanic Studies (253.879.3186) or the Office of Academic Advising (253.879.3250) for a preliminary answer to your questions. In most cases, you will meet with an advisor to find an appropriate placement during Orientation Week or in the first week of classes.

Theatre 200: The Theatrical Experience
(Professor Jess Smith)
In this course, students explore the aesthetics and traditions of the theatrical art form through studies in acting, directing, design, playwriting, dramaturgy, spectatorship, and theater history. Students encounter the diversity and complexity of the theater-making process by way of readings, lectures, discussions, play going, and workshop performances of scenes. Using critical and analytical tools studied over the course of the semester, students learn ways of exploring the theatrical experience both orally and in writing. Satisfies Artistic Approaches core requirement.