Spiritual Services and Practices

While many religious or spiritual practices are very personal in nature, we also know that for many students there is much value in gathering in community.  In addition to practices or services offered through student clubs, we specifically strive to support several ongoing opportunities on-campus.  This is an open-ended and evolving list – there’s always space to find new ways to meet students’ interests!  Participation is always by individual choice, and most practices are very welcoming of those who want to observe or learn more about different spiritual traditions.

Friday Night Shabbat
Our student-led Shabbat services are held each Friday during the academic year.  The location varies from year to year, but the combination of strong leadership from our Hillel with support from the campus helps to provide Jewish students the opportunity to gather weekly to welcome the Sabbath!  Our services tend to be very informal and reflect the Reform background of many of our students, but are constantly adapting to meet the needs and makeup of the campus Jewish community.

Islamic Prayer
Our dedicated Islamic Prayer Room is available for Muslim students throughout the academic year.  A Qu’ran and prayer mats are always available.  While our Muslim community is small, we’re committed to offering a safe and welcoming space for community and prayer.

Christian Resources

In addition to special programs hosted by the CICE, and campus-coordinated services during Orientation, Advent, Ash Wednesday, Easter, and Commencement, much of our Christian worship is led by our diverse student clubs.  There are usually at least two to three opportunities for Christian worship on campus each week led by clubs like Lighthouse, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, and InterVarsity Christian Fellowship.

Buddhist Meditation and Prayer
Our campus Meditation Room is home to a variety of spiritual traditions, but is focused on providing a space for Buddhist students, with support from the Tacoma Buddhist Temple.  While the complexity and global nature of Buddhism mean that there are many different ways people may choose to meditate or pray within Buddhist practice, we always encourage students to come together to explore different forms and rhythms for sitting meditation.