Reacting to the Past Faculty Workshop

"'Why is your class so loud?': Reacting to the Past and Student Engagement" was held from Tuesday, May 23-Thursday, May 25, 2017.

  • Faculty learned more about Reacting pedagogy, its issues, and what it looks like in the classroom.
  • Participants had the opportunity to play one of two games: Confucianism and the Succession Crisis of the Wanli Emperor or Greenwich Village, 1913: Suffrage, Labor, and the New Woman. See below for descriptions of each game!
  • Faculty learned more about incorporating RTTP and Experiential Learning into their syllabi.


Game Descriptions

Confucianism and the Succession Crisis of the Wanli Emperor

Confucianism and the Succession Crisis of the Wanli Emperor brings to life the suppleness and power of Confucian thought.  The game is set in the Hanlin Academy in Ming dynasty China. Most students are members of the Grand Secretariat of the Hanlin Academy, the body of top-ranking graduates of the civil service examination who serve as advisers to the Wanli emperor. Some Grand Secretaries are Confucian “purists,” who hold that tradition obliges the emperor to name his first-born son as successor; others, in support of the most senior of the Grand Secretaries, maintain that it is within the emperor’s right to choose his successor; and still others, as they decide this matter among many issues confronting the empire, continue to scrutinize the teachings of Confucianism for guidance. The game unfolds amidst the secrecy and intrigue within the walls of the Forbidden City, as scholars struggle to apply Confucian precepts to a dynasty in peril.


Greenwich Village, 1913: Suffrage, Labor, and the New Woman

Greenwich Village 1913: Suffrage, Labor, and the New Woman takes students to the beginning of the modern era when urbanization, industrialization, and massive waves of immigration were transforming the U.S. way of life. As the game begins, suffragists are taking to the streets demanding a constitutional amendment for the vote. What, they ask, is women’s place in society? Are they to remain in the home or take an active role in the government of their communities and their nation? Labor has turned to the strike to demand living wages and better conditions; some are even proposing an industrial democracy where workers take charge of industries. Can corporate capitalism allow an economically just society or must it be overturned? African-Americans, suffering from the worst working conditions, disenfranchisement, and social segregation, debate how to support their community through education and protest, thereby challenging their continuing marginalization in both the South and the North. Members of all these groups converge in Greenwich Village to debate their views with the artists and bohemians who are in the process of remaking themselves into the new men and new women of the twentieth century. Their spirited conversations not only show a deep understanding of nineteenth-century thinkers like Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Karl Marx; they are also informed by such contemporaries as Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Jane Addams, W.E.B. Du Bois, Emma Goldman, John Dewey, Franz Boas, and Sigmund Freud. The game asks what social changes are most important as well as how one can or should realize these goals.

 

LEARN MORE ABOUT REACTING TO THE PAST