Experiential Learning

Active and engaged learning experiences take place inside and outside the classroom throughout your four-year experience. Contact your advisor for more information on these and other opportunities.

maroon color block Conduct Research

maroon color block Departmental Activities

  • Be a Tutor, Lab Assistant, and/or Grader for our department. Look for applications toward the beginning of each semester.

  • Join a Math/CS student club via the ASUPS Clubs page.

    • Mathematical Association of America (MAA). See Prof. Martin Jackson for more information.
    • Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
    • Women in the Association for Computing Machinery (W-ACM)

maroon color block Extramural Experience

maroon color block Experiential Coursework

  • Math 295 Problem Seminar
    In this class students and faculty discuss problems that cut across the boundaries of the standard courses and investigate general strategies of problem solving. Students are encouraged to participate in a national mathematics competition. Any student can participate in the Putnam Competition without enrolling in Math 295. 

  • Math 296 Problem Seminar in Mathematical Modeling
    In this class students are given examples of problems from an annual international mathematical modeling contest. The students, in groups and with faculty mentoring, develop approaches to the problems. The students and faculty also discuss winning solutions to the problems. The students are expected to participate in the contest and give a presentation of their solution.

  • CS 295 Problem Solving Seminar
    Consideration of a diverse range of problems in computer science from problems in the design of correct and efficient algorithms and the implementation of data structures through problems in the theory of computation.

  • CS 440 Capstone in Computer Science
    The senior capstone course provides CS majors the opportunity to integrate the knowledge that they have gained from across the curriculum. Students are encouraged to work in teams, and can pursue either an applied or theory project. Students choosing applied projects participate in the identification of a problem, develop a project proposal outlining an approach to the problem's solution, implement the proposed solution, and test or evaluate the result. Students choosing a theory project conduct original research (e.g., develop a new algorithm) and evaluate its strengths and limitations. Regardless of the choice of project, students document their work in the form of written reports and oral presentations.