Hispanic Studies Course Offerings Fall 2017

SPAN 101-ELEMENTARY SPANISH
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of Spanish and focuses on the development of four skills: comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is placed on active communication and the development of oral and comprehension skills.                   

SPAN 201- INTERMEDIATE SPANISH
Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or permission of the instructor
These are mid-level courses for students seeking to perfect their command of Spanish. The courses consist of oral and written assignments on a variety of topics chosen to increase the student's control of the structures and vocabulary of the language. The courses also include a thorough review of grammar at a fairly advanced level.

SPAN 203 - ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION
Prerequisite: any one of SPAN 201 & 202 or their equivalents
Dr. Alicia Ramírez Dueker
This is a post-intermediate course in which students develop their writing skills by studying key aspects of Spanish grammar and exploring topics from modern Hispanic culture and history.  Students will practice writing concise, well-argued essays on a range of topics drawn from a selection of iconic short stories and short novels.

SPAN 204 - ADVANCED ORAL EXPRESSION
Prerequisite: any one of SPAN 201 & 202 or their equivalents
Dr. Pepa Lago Graña
This course combines linguistic functions and structures with culture through an integration of listening, speaking, reading and writing activities. The course concentrates on improving oral fluency in Spanish by using the topics of Spanish and Latin American films, and their illustration of language in cultural context for class discussion.

SPAN 210 - LATINA/O AMERICA: A CRITICAL INTRODUCTION TO LATINA/O STUDIES
Prerequisites: SPAN 201 & 202 or their equivalents
Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this course explores the historical, social, political, and cultural configurations of this fact and of what has come to be known as Latina/o U.S.A. The course begins with a discussion on the colonial roots of Spanish in the Americas; what are the historical and colonial relations of power leading to the presence of Spanish speaking peoples and Latino cultures in the U.S.? In posing this question the course examines the nascent U.S. nation as a political and colonizing force throughout the 19th century; its politics of colonization towards Native Americans, Mestizos, and people of Spanish and African descent through Manifest Destiny, the institutions of Slavery, the Mexican American War (1846-1848) and the Spanish-American War (1898). Literature, film, historical accounts, and social science works serve to discuss the central issues of this course: migrations, racisms, language as a marginalizing and/or empowering tool, key political and social moments in the Latino experience, the entrenchment of neoliberal economic policies and immigration, deportations and U.S. immigration policies, Latino community building, gender practices, heterogeneities of Latino populations, and politics of identity. Cross-listed with LTS 200. This course is taught in English.

SPAN 212-LATIN AMERICAN CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION
Prerequisites: SPAN 201 & 202 or their equivalents
Dr. Brendan Lanctot
This course introduces the student to the culture and civilization of Latin America, with an emphasis on the history, visual art, music, and prevalent cultural myths integral to the civilizations and cultures of the region.  The course considers the relevance of these cultural elements within a Hispanic context and a larger world perspective.

SPAN 300 - LITERATURE, THEORY, AND PRACTICE
Prerequisites: SPAN 203-212 or its equivalent
Dr. Brendan Lanctot
A study of the major genres of Hispanic literature through close analyses of selected masterpieces. This class prepares the student for more advanced studies in literary and cultural studies.

SPAN  301- LITERATURE OF THE AMERICAS
Prerequisites: SPAN 203-212 or its equivalent
Dr. Pepa Lago Graña                
A panoramic survey of the literature of the Americas. The texts studied in the course reflect literary developments up to the present. Works to be discussed illustrates cultural elements that are evidenced in today's society. Latino Literature written in the United States may also be included.

SPAN 309/LTS300: LATINA/O LITERATURES:
TRANSGRESSIVE, DISOBEDIENT ENUNCIATIONS FROM LATINA/O AMERICA
Prerequisite: any one of SPAN 203-212 or its equivalent
This course introduces students to some of the most contemporary Latina/o discursive productions and expressions by situating these in their broader cultural, social, and political framework.  Plays, short stories, novels, testimonies, poetry, autobiography, essays, and film serve to explore complex and often silenced histories,  issues, and realities in present-day U.S. Latina/o communities. In this manner, the course looks at Latino textualidades as a platform for cultural, social, individual, historical, and political expositions; a place where ideologies are contested, debated, and articulated; a site where subjectivities are problematized, enunciated, and made visible. Central to this course are questions pertaining to: the neoliberal market and the commodification of the Latino body; identity construction (and/or destruction); the intersections of sexuality, gender, and class in informing discourse; racisms; discourses of privilege; language and art as a conduit for the erasure of invisibilities; the intersections of systems of power in the literary; border politics, death and violence in the Latino experience; racialization of the Latino body; conditions of exile and diaspora; U.S. immigration politics and, among others, defiant Latina/o sexualities.

SPAN 410 - VOICES OF DISSENT IN FRANCOIST SPAIN (1939-1975)
Prerequisite: any SPAN 300 or its equivalent
Dr. Mark Harpring   
At the end of Spain’s bloody civil war in 1939, the triumphant and conservative army general Francisco Franco declared himself “Caudillo de España por la gracia de Dios.” Over the next four decades, Spain suffered economic and cultural stagnation; traditional ideologies sanctioned by the Church permeated every aspect of political, social, and family life; and political liberties were curtailed. Life in Spain was, in many respects, a return to the oppressive Victorian morality of the nineteenth century. Many writers and intellectuals fled Spain, vowing not to return until the general was dead. Others remained and were active during the dictatorship, although strict censorship of literary and theatrical productions challenged them to express transgressive ideas in creative and subversive ways. The authors of the texts we will read approach the oppressive political, cultural and social milieu from their individual circumstances yet manage to give a collective voice to Spaniards who found themselves at odds with the ruling regime during the dictatorship.