Spring 2020 Courses & Descriptions

CLSC 101: Intro Ancient Mediterranean
Mo,We,Fr 10:00-10:50 a.m.
Eric Orlin

This co-taught course introduces students to the ancient Mediterranean world and to the discipline of Classics. The course offers an overview of ancient Mediterranean cultures and how those cultures have been variously put to use by contemporaneous and subsequent cultures so as to produce notions of the "Classics" or the "classical tradition." Attention focuses especially on questions about essential content and methodologies in the discipline(s), the problem of assessing bias in our sources and ourselves, processes of canon formation that enable us to call some things "classical" and some things not, and the production of modern narratives about antiquity. The course aims to provide a shared foundation for students interested in the ancient world and to demonstrate what students and scholars can *do* with this material as an inherently multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary field of inquiry. To that end, all members of the department as well as faculty from related departments lead lectures and seminars on topics such as oral poetry, slave rebellions, and the Dead Sea Scrolls.

CLSC 180: Greek Odyssey: Study in Greece
We 4:00-4:50
Brett Rogers

This course centers on an intensive three-week academic tour of Greece that takes place after graduation in May. There, students use the sites, landscape, and, museums of Greece as the classroom from which they can make a holistic study of the Greece they had only previous experienced through texts. In other words, this course places ancient Greece and its texts in their real, physical context. In Greece, students spend about 10-12 hours each day on sites, in museums, and in active discussions, including a one-hour seminar discussion at the end of each day. During these three weeks, students engage with Greece ancient and modern as much as possible. During the spring semester, prior to the trip to Greece, students will meet one hour per week to start preparing for the trip. Such preparations will include sessions dedicated to learning fundamental information for the study of prehistoric, archaic, classical, and post-classical Greece, as well as necessary technical terminology and research tools for encountering sites and giving site reports. This course is open to all students, with preference given to students in Greek, Latin, and Classics courses.
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

CLSC 210: History of Ancient Rome
Mo,We,Fr 9:00-9:50 a.m.
Bill Barry

How did a small farming village on the banks of the Tiber River become mistress of an empire stretching from Britain to Egypt? This course explores the political institutions, social structures, and cultural attitudes that enabled Rome to become the world's only superpower at the time. One theme of the course is how that rise to power affected the lives of the Romans and how the Romans affected the lives of all those they encountered. Roman constitutional developments, the religions of the Roman world, and the connection between Roman culture (including art, literature, and popular entertainment such as gladiatorial games) feature prominently among the topics covered.

CLSC 232: Ancient Comedy
Mo,We,Fr 2:00-2:50
Aislinn Melchior

This class surveys the surviving plays of Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus, and Terence. The class discusses the structural features of Old Comedy (such as the chorus and the parabasis), the canonical definitions of Old, Middle, and New comedy, as well as the revolution of style and taste that differentiates Menander from Aristophanes. In the mythic world of tragedy, mortal trespass results in tragic consequences. In comedy, on the other hand, the mortal realm ' flawed, confused, and rudely physical ' arrives at the curtain both victorious and fecund. The class looks at the ways in which comedy transgresses social norms and the role of the carnivalesque in ancient culture. Students need not know Greek or Latin but must be willing to perform in front of their classmates.

CLSC 321: Gods, Magic, and Mysteries: Greek and Roman Religion
Mo,Fr 12:00-1:20
Eric Orlin

Students examine the religions of ancient Greece and Rom and the ways in which these religious systems functioned within the context of their societies. 'Religion' meant something very different to the Greeks and Romans than it does to modern Americans: it penetrated daily life, politics and law in ways that can seem foreign to us. The course utilizes literary, archaeological and artistic evidence to understand religious practices from the time of the Greek city-states to the establishment of Christianity as the Roman state religion. Topics covered include Greek and Roman conceptions of divinity, temples and sanctuaries, rituals, personal or family religion, gender roles within ancient religion, and the existence of mystery cults. Students read both primary and secondary works to understand Greek and Roman religion as a system of 'things done' (ritual) and 'things said' (prayer, myth, etc.) and discuss the extent to which it is proper to add the phrase 'things believed.'

CLSC 330: Theories of Myth
Mo,Fr 12:00-1:20
Brett Rogers

This course examines classical, world, and contemporary mythologies, with a particular emphasis on the history of theories used to study mythology. The course starts with Greco-Roman theories for analyzing classical myths, then analyzes in detail theories that have arisen since the end of the eighteenth century: comparative approaches, linguistics, psychology, structuralism, religion and ritual, class-, race-, and gender-based approaches. It is recommended that students have previously taken a course in myth or literary/gender theory (e.g., CLSC 210, ENGL 344, GNDR 201, etc.).

Greek 102: Beginning Ancient Greek
Mo,Tu,We,Fr 11:00-11:50
Brett Rogers

This course is a continuation of 101. Students further their study of the basic grammar and vocabulary of classical Greek with the aim of reading Greek tragedy, philosophy, and history in the original. Special emphasis is placed on the sound of Greek. Students also become familiar with some of the fundamental characteristics of Greek civilization. Successful completion of this course and Greek 101 satisfies the university's foreign language requirement.
Prerequisites: Greek 101

Greek 301: Advanced Greek
Mo,We,Fr 3:00-3:50
Brett Rogers

Students read substantial selections from ancient authors. The majority of class time is spent on the study of the syntax, semantics, and stylistics of those readings in order to build students' speed and accuracy in reading Greek, and to facilitate appreciation of the texts. In addition, students become familiar with the cultural contexts of their readings through discussion, brief lectures, secondary readings, and student reports and papers. Reading selections vary: they may be centered on the production of a single author, or organized around a cultural theme, literary genre, or historical event. Does not count toward fulfillment of Communication II, Option B core requirement.
Prerequisites: Greek 201

LAT 102: Beginning Latin
Mo,Tu,We,Fr 11:00-11:50
Bill Barry

This course is a continuation of 101. Students further their study of the basic grammar and vocabulary of classical Latin with the aim of reading Roman poetry, drama, oratory, and history in the original. Special emphasis is placed on the pronunciation of Latin. Students also become familiar with some of the fundamental characteristics of Roman civilization. Successful completion of this course and Latin 101 satisfies the university's foreign language requirement.
Prerequisites: LAT 101 with a grade of C- or higher, or permission of the instructor.

LAT 301: Advanced Latin
Mo,We,Fr 9:00-9:50
Aislinn Melchior

Students read substantial selections from ancient authors. The majority of class time is spent on the study of the syntax, semantics, and stylistics of those readings in order to build students' speed and accuracy in reading Latin, and to facilitate appreciation of the texts. In addition, students become familiar with the cultural contexts of their readings through discussion, brief lectures, secondary readings, and student reports and papers. Reading selections vary: they may be centered on the production of a single author, or organized around a cultural theme, literary genre, or historical event. Does not count toward fulfillment of Communication II, Option B core requirement.
Prerequisites: LAT 201

SSI2 103: Alexander the Great
Mo,We,Fr 2:00-2:50
Bill Barry

Alexander the Great has been endlessly studied, celebrated, demonized, heroized, and satirized. Some
have viewed him as a unifier of mankind, others as a destroyer of civilization. Who was Alexander the Great? What are the realities behind the popular images? Through close reading and evaluation of primary
sources and secondary literature, students develop a deep understanding of Alexander and his world and sharpen their skills of critical reading, writing, and research. Affiliate department: Classics. The SSI1 version
satisfies the Seminar in Scholarly Inquiry 1 core requirement. The SSI2 version satisfies the Seminar in Scholarly Inquiry 2 core requirement.

SSI2 131: Gender and Labor in Early 20th Century New York
Mo,We,Fr 9:00-9:50
Eric Orlin

This course takes students to the beginning of the modern era when urbanization, industrialization, and massive waves of immigration were transforming the U.S. way of life. In 1913, suffragists were taking to the streets demanding a constitutional amendment for the vote: What, they ask, is women’s place in society? At the same time, the Labor movement turned to the strike to demand living wages and better conditions. Is corporate capitalism compatible with an economically just society or must it be overturned? Members of these groups converged in Greenwich Village with the artists and bohemians who were discussing how to remake America for the modern age, as well as with African-Americans who were continuing to suffer from disenfranchisement.
Their debates about suffrage and labor thus intermingled with other concerns about gender roles, sex and birth control, racial segregation, and art as America entered the twentieth century. As part of exploring these issues, students will participate in a role-playing simulation in which they must decide: Which social changes are most important, and how does one achieve one’s goals? After the exercise, students will embark on a research project exploring an issue of their own choosing arising from their study of this crucial period in American history.
Affiliate department: Classics. Satisfies the Seminar in Scholarly Inquiry 2 core requirement.