Fall 2020 Courses & Descriptions

CLSC 130A: Classical Mythology
MoWeFr
1:25PM - 2:15PM
Megan O'Donald

This course explores myths and legends from classical antiquity and the light they cast on ancient conceptions of men and women, civilization, nature, and the divine. The embodiment of myths in ancient literature and art is the central focus of the course, as is the role of myth in Greek and Roman religious ritual and belief. The course also takes note of the subsequent life of Greek myths in Roman, medieval, Renaissance and modern literature, art, and society and examines some of the principal modern theoretical perspectives on myth in general and Greek myth in particular.


CLSC 211A: History of Ancient Greece
MoWeFr
9:05AM - 9:55AM
Michael Ng

This course makes an odyssey through Greek political, social, cultural, and economic history from the Bronze Age (c. 1200 BCE) to the death of Alexander the Great (323 BCE). The emphasis is less on the chronicle of events than on understanding the changing nature of Greek society during this period. Major topics to be explored include the development of the city-state as a political unit; notions of equality in ancient Greece; and the simultaneous flourishing of the arts and building of an empire at Athens under Pericles. Students learn to use both archaeological remains and literary texts, including histories and poetry, to reconstruct the nature of Greek society.


CLSC 280 (SOAN 280): Archaeological Foundations
Tu, Th
4:10PM-5:30PM
Ian Randall

Archaeology seeks to uncover artifacts and the material culture of human life in order to understand past civilizations and the long-term development of human societies across space and time. This course offers an introduction to the field of archaeology, providing an overview of its goals, theory, methods, and ethics. Students discuss specific archaeological sites in their historical, social, anthropological, economic, religious, and architectural contexts. Attention is given to issues relevant to classical archaeology today, including the looting of ancient sites, issues of cultural property, and ethics in archaeology. Students have the opportunity to learn and practice basic archaeological techniques, as well as to reflect on the significance of these techniques for understanding other peoples. The course will shift in its regional and historical foci, including an introduction to classical archaeology of the ancient Mediterranean world. Students thus gain an appreciation of the complexities of present-day archaeological research and both the benefits and limitations of the role of archaeology in creating our images of the past.


Greek 101: Beginning Ancient Greek
MoTuWeFr
11:15AM - 12:05AM
Brett Rogers

This course is an introduction to the classical Greek of Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries BCE and is primarily designed to provide students a foundation for reading Greek tragedy, philosophy, and history in the original. Special emphasis is placed on the sound of Greek. Students also become familiar with some of the fundamental characteristics of Greek civilization.

GRK 201: Intermediate Greek
MoWeFr
10:10AM - 11:00AM
Aislinn Melchior

Review of grammar, readings of ancient authors.


GRK 301: Advanced Greek Reading
MoWeFr
Aislinn Melchior

Students read substantial selections from ancient authors. The majority of class time is spent on the study of the syntax, semantics, and stylistics of those readings in order to build students' speed and accuracy in reading Greek, and to facilitate appreciation of the texts. In addition, students become familiar with the cultural contexts of their readings through discussion, brief lectures, secondary readings, and student reports and papers. Reading selections vary: they may be centered on the production of a single author, or organized around a cultural theme, literary genre, or historical event. Does not count toward fulfillment of Communication II, Option B core requirement.


LAT101: Beginning Latin
MoTuWeFr
11:15AM - 12:05AM
Megan O'Donald

This course is an introduction to classical Latin (particularly as spoken, written, and read in the first centuries BCE and CE) and provides students a foundation for reading Roman poetry, drama, oratory, and history in the original. Special emphasis is placed on the pronunciation of Latin. Students also become familiar with some of the fundamental characteristics of Roman civilization.


LAT 201: Intermediate Latin
MoWeFr
10:10AM - 11:00AM
Luke Parker

This course is a continuation of first-year Latin. After a brief grammatical review, students read selections from ancient authors.


LAT 301: Advanced Latin
Mo,Fr
12:30PM-1:50PM
Megan O'Donald

Students read substantial selections from ancient authors. The majority of class time is spent on the study of the syntax, semantics, and stylistics of those readings in order to build students' speed and accuracy in reading Latin, and to facilitate appreciation of the texts. In addition, students become familiar with the cultural contexts of their readings through discussion, brief lectures, secondary readings, and student reports and papers. Reading selections vary: they may be centered on the production of a single author, or organized around a cultural theme, literary genre, or historical event.


CONN 377: Caesar in Vietnam: PTSD in the Ancient World?
Mo,Fr
4:00PM-5:20PM
Aislinn Melchior

CONN 377 Caesar in Vietnam: PTSD in the Ancient World This class takes a penetrating look at the burgeoning scholarly interest in Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and its possible relevance to ancient combat in Greece and Rome. Extensive readings include selections from Homer’s Iliad, Odyssey, the tragedies Aias and Herakles Mainomenos, and Roman battle accounts. Students then look at how various of these works have been interpreted as proof of PTSD in the ancient world, most notably by psychologist Jonathan Shay, but also by an increasing number of classical scholars. Modern studies of the causes of PTSD, its definition, and how it is diagnosed provide theories of how combat causes traumatic injury. Along the way students engage with first hand accounts of combatants from multiple periods and battle zones. Each student then writes a research paper that explores a pre-industrial account of combat using the theoretical models from modern psychological and social scientific writing as well as modern comparanda. Students reach their own conclusions, but must argue with sophistication and demonstrate an awareness of the different types of evidence and the particular challenges posed by each source and approach. Is human reaction to trauma situational or inherent or a bit of both? Satisfies the Connections core requirement.