Gender

Book art on gender -

 "Why You Can't Get Married" by Nava Atlas. "Why You Can’t Get  Married: An Unwedding Album demonstrates how the very arguments used to oppose interracial marriage in generations past have been recycled for use against same-sex marriage. The album’s prettiness stands in stark contrast to the ugliness of the language of bias framed within, a stark reminder that there’s still a way to go to before equal protection under the law is achieved, affecting the freedom to marry desired by numerous committed couples. I made this book because I observe the absurd situation of several sets of gay friends whose marriages aren’t recognized in the states in which they live. In addition, I’m the parent of a transgender bisexual daughter and believe that who she chooses to love, and eventually settle down with, should not be dictated by outmoded laws."

 

"Amalgam" by Emily Chaplain "Amalgam" by Emily Chaplain. "Amalgam evolved from my interest in conflicting scientific studies that try to find out whether differences in the female and male brains determine things such as mental ability, personality, emotion and behavior. I am interested in the tension between these studies and the potential negative implications acceptance of research that finds inherent gendered brain difference could have on our lives and on obtaining gender equality in our society. The digitally printed accordion of Amalgam depicts a woman on the front and a man on the back, whose portraits were purposefully pixellated to give a sense of the images breaking down. I hand cut the pop out structure to give a sense of the two images blending together and weaving in and out of each other. The recession on the cover is a digital print evocative of neurons and was shaped to imply a microscopic slide."

 

"Coalesce" by Emily Chaplain. "The idea behind Coalesce grew from my interest in various conflicting scientific studies that try to find out whether differences in the female and male brains determine things such as mental ability, personality, emotion and behavior. I am interested in the tension between these studies and the potential negative implications acceptance of research that finds inherent gendered brain difference could have on our lives and on obtaining gender equality in our society. The pages of Coalesce show portraits of a woman and man intersecting to evoke a blending of characteristics and represent an androgynous mind. I view this piece as offering my solution to the conflicting research on gendered brain differences—one where the side of research that believes brains are a mosaic of female and male characteristics is accepted."

 

"Resolutions 1848" by Julie Shaw Lutts. "Resolutions 1848 was directly inspired by reading the resolutions written and declared by Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton in 1848. Here in these writings you will find simple, bold truths. Without drama or sentimentality these proclamations are meant to give women equality in the eyes of the world. I began to read and copy out the Resolutions in my own hand. In the process, I was better able to contemplate the true meaning of the words. These women lived in a time with limited freedoms, unable to speak their thoughts in public or even privately. In the first Resolution, the authors write of the American ideal of happiness. (“Resolved, That such laws as conflict, in any way, with the true and substantial happiness of woman, are contrary to the great precept of nature,”). Such a simple ideal, to be allowed to be happy without being repressed in your own home or town! The Resolutions continue to speak of “Equality, Enlightenment, Opportunity, Fairness”, and the basic freedom of being counted, having the right as a human to cast your vote for the leaders of your country. Unbelievably, over a century later, all of the Resolutions of 1848 are still ideals worth fighting for. Many women are still held back, defined by the needs and power of others. I created this small accordion book after finishing my unique 3D artist book of the same name, so it may be shared with more readers."

 

"Are You Having Trouble With My Gender?" by Florian Palucci and Alex Barnawell "Are You Having Trouble With My Gender" by Florian Palucci and Alex Barnawell. "This book was written by Alex Barnawell and Florian Palucci, who both use singular they/them pronouns. As nonbinary (we don’t identify as male or female) transgender (we don’t identify with the gender we were assigned at birth) individuals, we find ourselves battling gender conventions in language on a daily basis. Language is one of a myriad of arenas in which trans people have to fight for recognition and respect of our identities. This book was born out of many, many misgenderings. It was created with the intention of being a primer on gender neutral pronouns and why care must be taken when using gendered language."

 

"Are You a Boy or a Girl?" by Amy Ryken "Are You a Boy or a Girl? by Amy Ryken. "This book reveals conversations I’ve had with elementary students inquiring about my gender. By making these conversations visible I question the binary framing of gender, consider how to foster dialogue about gender expression, and explore how gender is framed in elementary classrooms and society. My hope is that the book will sponsor conversations about gender and how adults might engage young children in dialogue about sameness and difference."

 

"Are Women Human?" by Cynthia Schubert "Are Women Human?" by Cynthia Schubert. "Violence against women and girls is a global pandemic of alarming proportions, deeply rooted in gender inequality and discrimination. No woman or girl is entirely free of its risks or reach. It takes many forms and occurs in many places. One in three women in the world is a victim of violence. An essay from Catherine MacKinnon’s book Are Women Human? And Other International Dialogues was used for the artwork’s text. I created a template from a doll’s dress sewn by my grandmother. The original mulberry papers were dyed with gouache, walnut ink and rusty nails, and the text was written with 4B graphite. The edition was printed with ink jet on unbleached mulberry paper and each is packaged in a miniature handmade grocery sack."