Douglas C. Sackman

Professor
History
dsackman@pugetsound.edu
253.879.3913

Doug SackmanDouglas C. Sackman’s teaching and research areas include the history of the North American West (including California, the Pacific Northwest, the borderlands, and Hawaii and the Pacific), environmental history, and Native American history. He is the author of the books Orange Empire: California and the Fruits of Eden and Wild Men: Ishi and Kroeber in the Wilderness of Modern America, and he is editor of A Companion to American Environmental History. Sackman is working on a book titled American Panorama: Rediscovering the History of the North American West. He published a 2016 essay on the way Mad Men ties into the history and culture of California and Sunkist.He has given public lectures on art and the North American West at the Tacoma Art Museum; on the California Gold Rush, for the 5th Avenue Theater in Seattle, and on “The Tyranny of Turf: Los Angeles Landscapes after the Aqueduct,” for a symposium sponsored by University of Southern California and Tree People, in Los Angeles. Along with John Lear, Sackman held the James Dolliver National Endowment for the Humanities Distinguished Teaching Professor chair in which they explored the idea, history, and ramifications of borders for society, politics, and culture, focusing on the US-Mexico border and borderlands in particular. 

 

B.A., Reed College, 1990; Ph.D., University of California, Irvine, 1997

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