Class Notes

1956

Eugene Johnson, a Puget Sound business administration graduate and Sigma Nu pledge class president, is keeping busy as chair of the Lions Sight and Hearing Foundation of Southern California. The organization provides low-cost eye surgery and hearing aids to Southern California residents in need. He also serves as treasurer for Lions Clubs International’s District 4L2. He and his wife, LeAnn, also recently welcomed their sixth great-grandchild.

1967

Stealing Puget Sound, 1832-1869 by Jerry RamseyJerry Ramsey donated the copyright of his book, Stealing Puget Sound, 1832-1869, to the DuPont History Museum in DuPont, Wash. The museum will continue to publish the work, which is the most comprehensive 19th-century history of the region. Stealing Puget Sound explores the relationship and little-known political tension that occurred between the first British settlers and the Americans who crossed the Oregon Trail 15 years later. Jerry has received three awards in connection to the book: The Murray Morgan Award from the Tacoma Historical Society, the Heritage League of Pierce County’s Publications Award, and the Pinnacle Award from the Book Entrepreneurs. It is Jerry’s third and most successful book, and has just completed its fourth printing. Jerry holds a bachelor’s degree in education from Puget Sound, a master’s degree in education from the University of Washington, and a Ph.D. from Columbia University. He lives with his wife, Elaine Perdue Ramsey ’63, in Tacoma at Brookdale Allenmore. Elaine recently suffered a stroke, he says, and would love to receive cards from old friends.

1971

Lucy DeYoung, a business owner in Woodinville, Wash., and the city’s first mayor, led the 40th annual Celebrate Woodinville Community Parade as grand marshal on Aug. 18. She owns an executive office suites business and a property management company, and holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration and political science from Puget Sound. She earned her master’s degree in business administration from Northwestern University in 1984.

1974 REUNION YEAR

Yahoo! News reported in May that Craig Eerkes, who holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Puget Sound, has been appointed chairman of the board of Columbia Bank. He has served on the board since 2014, and succeeds William Weyerhaeuser, a Puget Sound trustee who served as chairman of the board since 2001. In addition to serving on the bank’s board, Craig has served as the president and chief executive officer of Sun Pacific Energy Inc., a Tri-Cities-based retail and wholesale petroleum company, and was director of WMI Insurance Company for 16 years.

1978

Bryan Foxley was hired by commercial real estate lending, investment, and advisory company Greystone in August. The commercial lending veteran is Greystone’s managing director and is tasked with expanding the company’s lending operations in the Seattle area. He was previously vice president of commercial real estate
finance at Intervest, a bank-owned mortgage banking company. Bryan holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Puget Sound.

1979 REUNION YEAR

Steve Aliment single Home to You coverSteven Aliment ‘79, P’10, P’12, who retired from a career in aerospace sales two years ago, is using his retirement to pursue music. He has been performing with Seattle guitarist Jack Johnson— together the duet is called Denny Blaine—and has been working on his solo career. This summer, he released three singles, and he plans to release more. When he is not making music or performing, he is serving on Puget Sound’s alumni council. He says he is “super excited” about the Class of ‘79 reunion next year. Steve earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Puget Sound, where he was a member of the Theta Chi fraternity.

1984 REUNION YEAR

In April, Timothy Gould became vice president of finance and operations for Make-A-Wish Alaska and Washington, an organization that grants wishes to children with critical illnesses. Timothy is responsible for managing the nonprofit’s finances in order to grant the most wishes possible. According to a statement from the organization announcing Timothy’s hire, Make-A-Wish Alaska and Washington hopes to grant 362 wishes to local children, but there are more than 500 children on the waiting list. Timothy holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Puget Sound and a master’s degree in the same subject from Seattle University. Most recently, he held positions at World Vision, a global relief and child sponsorship charity, and Seattle University. He also teaches finance classes online for the University of Phoenix, where he has been an adjunct faculty member for 10 years, and taught his 100th class this spring.

1985

Karen Meyer Eisenbrey's Daughter of MagicKaren Meyer Eisenbrey’s 11th book, Daughter of Magic, was published in May by Not a Pipe Publishing. The fantasy novel is one of nine books published by Not a Pipe this year in an effort to make 2018 “The Year of Publishing Women.” The challenge was posed in 2015 by British novelist Kamila Shamsie, who asked publishers to draw attention to gender equality by publishing books written only by women. Not a Pipe is the only U.S. publisher to accept Kamila’s challenge, and Karen said she is “proud and humbled to be included” in the publishing event. Karen holds a bachelor’s degree in English from Puget Sound.

1986

Margaret Dawson discussed diversity, mentoring, and her journey from journalist to technology executive in a July interview with London-based media company Compelo. Margaret is the vice president of portfolio product marketing at North Carolina tech firm Red Hat. She is also a mother and earned a bachelor’s degree in communication and theatre arts from Puget Sound. In the Compelo piece, she says she thought she didn’t have the right skills or educational background to break into such a heavily male-dominated field. While interviewing technology CEOs in China as a foreign correspondent for Business Week magazine, she had a realization. ”I remember looking across the table at the CEO and thinking, ‘I want to be there,’” she told Compelo. She has held positions at Amazon, Microsoft, and HP. In addition to her career, she now is a mentor for women, specifically working mothers, and helps them get into management positions.

1988

Glenn Geiser-Getz became SUNY Geneseo’s new vice provost for academic affairs on June 28. The former Keene State College associate provost holds a bachelor’s degree in communication and theatre arts from Puget Sound, a master’s degree in communication from the University of Arkansas, and a Ph.D. in communication from the University of Iowa. He has held teaching and administrative positions at multiple educational institutions for more than two decades and is a professional actor who enjoys performing onstage.

1991

Former Starbucks executive Rachel Ruggeri became Continental Mills’ chief financial officer and senior vice president in August. According to a summer Baking Business article, Rachel is responsible for the finance, accounting, and information resources for the parent company for Krusteaz, Kretschmer Wheat Germ, and other baking and snack brands. Rachel earned a bachelor’s degree in English from Puget Sound, where she became a member of the Gamma Phi Beta sorority and worked for KUPS, before earning a master’s degree in business administration from Washington State University.

1992

In July, Shelley Thompson was hired as vice president of development for the Denver Center for the Performing Arts. She holds a bachelor’s degree in politics and government from Puget Sound and a master’s degree in political science from the University of Colorado, Boulder. She was formerly executive director of the Foundation for Colorado Community Colleges.

1993

Edward Matuskey's Tarot of Brass and SteamTwenty-five years after earning his English degree from Puget Sound—and after a decade of work—Edward Matuskey released a deck of tarot cards illustrated by artists throughout the United States and Europe. The Tarot of Brass & Steam was designed by Edward, a self-professed taxonomist, gamer, and tarot aficionado. The deck features illustrations of a steampunk alternate reality. Decks were printed in the spring and went on sale this summer.

1996

Sara Shininger Deboy was named Oregon City School District’s associate director of teaching and learning in June, the Lake Oswego Review reports. The former Lake Oswego Junior High principal holds a bachelor’s degree in English from Puget Sound, a master’s degree in educational leadership from the University of Portland, and a doctorate in education from the University of Oregon. She has held administrative roles at multiple Oregon schools over the past 11 years.

The Tacoma Refugee Choir, directed by Erin Hennessey Guinup, was profiled in The News Tribune on May 9 ahead of its performance of Refugee Stories: Hope in a Divided World. Erin, who earned a bachelor’s degree in performance music from Puget Sound and was a member of the Adelphian Concert Choir, founded the choir in 2017, after a successful pilot project with Tacoma Community House. Currently, between 40 and 65 singers from 31 countries lend their voices to the troupe. “I was pretty naïve to the depth of xenophobia in our community,” Erin told The News Tribune when asked about her motivations for starting the group. “As a white woman, I hadn’t experienced a lot of the ambivalence and hatred toward people of color. It’s more important than ever that we remember who is in our community and to embrace that.”

1999 REUNION YEAR

Amy Paulose, president and CEO of local candy company AMES International, was quoted in a June 22 Tacoma News Tribune article about local businesses in Tacoma. Amy’s business is based in Fife, Wash., and sells treats under the Emily’s Chocolates label to customers around the globe. Amy holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Puget Sound and told The News Tribune that the company is expanding sales into China and business is booming.

2000

Gianna Piccardo Ripa was appointed dean of students at St. Mary’s High School, a private college-prep school in Stockton, Calif. This is her first job in education after a decade of being self-employed in the health and wellness sector. She graduated from Puget Sound with a degree in international political economy and served as ASUPS vice president her senior year. She thanks fellow Logger W. Houston Dougharty ‘83, who was Puget Sound’s dean of student services when she was a student, for the long talk that aided her decisionmaking process leading up to her accepting the job at St. Mary’s.

2001

In July, Amanda Hopkins was named district court judge in Colorado’s 12th Judicial District. According to the Valley Courier, Amanda worked as the managing deputy for the regional public defender’s office in Alamosa, Colo. The Colorado Springs native holds a bachelor’s degree in international political economy from Puget Sound and a law degree from Seattle University.

2002

Business Leadership Program alumna Heather Jones Nunamaker became the regional employment and training coordinator for the College of Eastern Idaho’s workforce training and community education programs in June. According to the Idaho Business Review, she has worked in the workforce development field for six years and has 15 years of experience in leadership and customer service. Heather holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Puget Sound and is a member of the Gamma Phi Beta sorority.

2004 REUNION YEAR

Jordan Hanssen, a former Puget Sound rower turned commercial fishing deckhand, was featured in a June 22 KDLG radio piece about his experience falling overboard with the rest of his crew while racing a rowboat across the Atlantic Ocean in 2013. “The boat could handle big, rough water. It’s just that these two waves that hit us were kind of funky. And they hit us like a one-two punch,” he told KDLG. “We were in the middle of shifting people in and out of the cabin, and by the time I saw the wave and by the time we were in the water and everybody was OK, it was between 10 to 15 seconds.” The crew was rescued by a Coast Guard vessel 12 hours after capsizing. Jordan spent this year’s fishing season in Alaska’s Bristol Bay. He said he will find “a cheap place to disappear” over the winter, near Seattle, to finish writing a set of novels.

Sarah Laub Skubas, a principal in the Hartford, Conn., office of Jackson Lewis P.C., was selected as one of the Connecticut Law Tribune’s “New Leaders in the Law” in May. The honor spotlights lawyers under the age of 40 who have excelled in the courtroom, in client service and cultivation, in service to bar associations, and in performing pro bono work or community service in a volunteer capacity. Sarah, who earned a bachelor’s degree in political science from Puget Sound before graduating from the New England School of Law, practices in the fields of employment litigation, preventive counseling, and labor relations.

2005

Aubrey Shelton ‘05, M.A.T.’06 is Puget Sound’s men’s basketball head coach. He was appointed in May, following the departure of former head coach Justin Lunt, who coached the Loggers for 12 seasons. The position is a homecoming for Aubrey, who played basketball as a Logger before earning his bachelor’s degree in history. He returned to Puget Sound and received a master’s degree in teaching. For the past 11 years, he has been just miles away from the Puget Sound campus, guiding Lincoln High School’s boys’ basketball team to a 237-57 record, including six district titles and eight league titles. “I’m extremely honored, grateful, and excited to return home to Puget Sound,” Aubrey said in statement from the Puget Sound athletics department. “Together, we can build a basketball program that will make the Logger and Tacoma community proud. I can’t wait to begin.”

This summer, Ali Striggow Wallace and Luke Grange participated in Miami University’s Earth Expeditions global field course in South America. Ali was in Paraguay studying new approaches to community-driven education. She helped develop an eco-leadership program with Para La Tierra, a local conservation organization. Ali is a children’s zookeeper at Houston Zoo, holds a bachelor’s degree in biology from Puget Sound, and is a graduate student in Miami University’s Global Field Program. Luke, who earned his bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Puget Sound, spent his summer in Brazil studying how to save golden tamarins. Luke is an education specialist at the Detroit Zoological Society. He is a graduate student in Miami University’s Advanced Inquiry Program.

2010

Christine Chan, who began her doctoral studies in geology at the University of Kansas this fall, is one of 12 doctoral students selected to receive the university’s prestigious Madison and Lila Self Graduate Fellowship. The four-year awards are granted to incoming or first-year doctoral students who demonstrate leadership, initiative, and a passion for achievement. The fellowship covers full tuition and fees, and provides financial assistance for graduate research assistants and professional development. Christine earned her bachelor’s degree in geology from Puget Sound, where she was a member of the Logger cross country and track teams, and worked for Tamanawas. She also holds a master’s degree in geology from Oregon State University.

One year after graduating from North Carolina’s Wake Forest School of Medicine, Ali Garel is a physician’s assistant at the University of Utah. Ali graduated from Puget Sound with a bachelor’s degree in biology and was a member of the Logger cross country, track, and ski racing teams.

2011

Kainoa Correa, a former Logger baseball player and assistant coach who is now an infield coach for the Cleveland Indians, will speak at the Inside Baseball Coaches Clinic in January. He is one of 15 renowned coaches presenting at the three-day high school baseball coaches clinic in New Jersey. Kainoa holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Puget Sound and coached four seasons at the University of North Carolina before joining the Indians.

As one of three Puget Sound alumni who participated in Miami University’s Earth Expeditions global field course, Jarek Sarnacki spent the summer studying avian and tropical ecology in the Amazon. Jarek, a staff biologist at Tacoma’s Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, lives in Tacoma and earned a bachelor’s degree in biology from Puget Sound. He is a graduate student in Miami University’s Global Field Program.

This July, seven years after graduating with a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry from Puget Sound, Alayna Schoblaske started a career as a dentist. She practices general dentistry at East Medford Dental Clinic in Medford, Ore., and earned a Doctor of Medicine in dentistry degree from Oregon Health & Science University‘s School of Dentistry in 2017.

Kelly Danielson M.O.T.'12 (far left, front) and the other members of the Sail Like a Girl team won the Race to Alaska on June 24. The team was the first all-women group to win the 750-mile unmotorized and unsupported race from Port Townsend, Wash., to Ketchikan, Alaska. Photo by Katrina Zoe Norbom/Racetoalaska.com.
Kelly Danielson M.O.T.’12 (far left, front) and the other members of the Sail Like a Girl team won the Race to Alaska on June 24. The team was the first all-women group to win the 750-mile unmotorized and unsupported race from Port Townsend, Wash., to Ketchikan, Alaska. Photo by Katrina Zoe Norbom/Racetoalaska.com.

2012

After nearly one week and 750 miles at sea, Kelly Danielson M.O.T.‘12 and the other Bainbridge Island women who make up team Sail Like a Girl won the Race to Alaska on June 24. The Peninsula Daily News reports that the team is the first all-women crew to win the human-powered race from Port Townsend, Wash., to Ketchikan, Alaska. No motors or support crews are allowed. Sail Like a Girl finished the race in six days, 13 hours, and 17 minutes—two hours ahead of the four-man second-place finishers, Team Lagopus. Forty-three teams participated this year, including Team BlueFlash, which had two current Puget Sound students as crew members. The fourth annual event promised a $10,000 first-place prize. Kelly and her teammates donated their winnings after expenses to Seattle’s Pink Boat Regatta, which raises money for breast cancer research.

Megan Mitchell, who holds a bachelor’s degree in French from Puget Sound and was KUPS’ music director, released her first album, Disambiguation, this summer. According to a July article in the East Bay Express, the Bay Area native’s debut album features layered vocals that “drift diaphanously atop ebbing electronic tones.” Her music also utilizes field recordings captured both in her hometown of Alameda, Calif., and in the Pacific Northwest. Megan, who performs under the moniker Cruel Diagonals, is also an archivist who holds a master’s degree in library and information science from the University of Washington. She is an electronic resources librarian at Touro University in Vallejo, Calif.; a freelance audio archivist; and overseer of Many Many Women, an online index of more than 1,100 underrepresented female, trans, and nonbinary composers. She told the East Bay Express that her passion for archives began at KUPS while she was overseeing the station’s transition from analog to a digital music library. That experience showed her “the trust imbued in you to make the choices about what has value,” she said. “The power to name or to shape a narrative is considered a sub-niche of library science, but I realized that it should actually be at the forefront.”

This summer, Amanda Nicol graduated with a master’s degree in divinity from Duke University and began a clinical pastoral education fellowship at the VA Medical Center in Portland, Ore. Amanda earned her bachelor’s degree in politics and government from Puget Sound, where she was a member of the Kappa Alpha Theta sorority and United Methodists (UMeth) club.

Ben Armstrong '13, a Colorado farmer, was featured in an article about young farmers in the May issue of Aspen magazine. Photo by Tyler Stableford.
Ben Armstrong ‘13, a Colorado farmer, was featured in an article about young farmers in the May issue of Aspen magazine. Photo by Tyler Stableford.

2013

Ben Armstrong was one of three new-generation Colorado farmers featured in a May article in Aspen magazine. The 27-year-old Carbondale-based farmer owns Roaring Gardens farm, where he grows produce including salad greens, seven varieties of potatoes, peppers, and edible flowers.

Colin Daunt graduated from Colorado State University with a master’s degree in food science and human nutrition in May. He is working as a dietetic intern at The Ohio State University and hopes to become certificated as a registered dietitian. Colin earned his bachelor’s degree in history from Puget Sound.

University of Hawai’i medical student Elisabeth Young in August received the 2017–2018 Excellence in Public Health Award from the United States Public Health Service, Kauai’s The Garden Island newspaper reports. The award recognizes medical students who are public health leaders in their communities and who increase awareness of the Public Health Service’s mission to protect, promote, and advance the health and safety of the nation. According to The Garden Island, Elisabeth also has been selected by the American Medical Association Foundation to attend the first AMA Foundation Leadership Development Institute. Elisabeth earned a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry from Puget Sound, where she joined the Alpha Phi sorority, and went on to earn a master’s degree in public health from Harvard University. She is set to graduate from the University of Hawai’i’s John A. Burns School of Medicine in May 2019.

2014 REUNION YEAR

In May, Emily Menk earned her master’s degree in counseling and student personnel from Minnesota State University, Mankato. Emily earned her bachelor’s degree in art and design from Puget Sound and works as an admissions officer at the university where she received her master’s degree.

2015

Molly Brown became Northeastern University Libraries’ reference and outreach archivist in April. She earned a bachelor’s degree in English and history from Puget Sound, where she became a member of the Gamma Phi Beta sorority and worked for KUPS. This summer, she graduated with a dual master’s degree in archives management and history from Simmons College.

Cassie Fastabend '15 (left), a graduate of Puget Sound's theatre arts program, was the title character in New Muses Theater's production of Lysistrata. The show ran at Tacoma's Dukesbay Theater in June and July. Photo by New Muses Theater.
Cassie Fastabend ‘15 (left), a graduate of Puget Sound’s theatre arts program, was the title character in New Muses Theater’s production of Lysistrata. The show ran at Tacoma’s Dukesbay Theater in June and July. Photo by New Muses Theater.

This summer, Cassie Fastabend put her theatre arts degree to use and starred as the lead character in New Muses Theater’s production of Lysistrata. Tacoma entertainment newspaper Weekly Volcano reported the antiwar farce was first performed in Greece more than 2,000 years ago. It centers on Cassie’s character, Lysistrata, a feminist activist who calls on other women to resist sexual favors until their husbands return from the Peloponnesian War. The Tacoma theater company performed an adaptation of the play at the Dukesbay Theater during three weekends in June and July. Cassie received rave reviews, with the Weekly Volcano reporting her performance was “crackling with visceral intelligence and confident defiance.”

Puget Sound sociology and anthropology alumna Rachel McKean graduated from George Washington University this summer with a master’s degree in museum studies.

Jeremy Perkovich was named defensive line coach for the Stetson University Hatters football team in July. The Washington native and former Logger football player began his coaching career as a defensive line coach and strength and conditioning coach at Puget Sound following his graduation. He spent the 2017–18 season at the University of San Diego as a defensive assistant before landing his current position in Florida. As a Logger, Jeremy earned his bachelor’s degree in exercise science, joined the Phi Delta Theta fraternity, and was named team defensive lineman in 2014.

2017

Lizzi Hahn, a Puget Sound biochemistry alumna, participated in a summer tobacco-research program at the Oklahoma Tobacco Research Center (OTRC). The center’s mission is to reduce and eliminate tobacco-related morbidity and mortality in Oklahoma through research. According to The Oklahoman, Lizzi was one of four students invited to participate in the 2018 Summer Scholars Program, which allowed the students to work under the mentorship of OTRC researchers on the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center campus. The four students conducted research and presented projects and abstracts to submit to the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. 

2018

In July, two months after graduating with a bachelor’s degree in both business and economics, Max Lamberty became a senior marketing coordinator for Principal Financial Group. The Portland, Ore., native is working at the financial investment management company’s branch in Lake Oswego, Ore.