Orientation 2015 Coordinators

They are Puget Sound.

IAN LATIMER

 

PERSPECTIVES CO-COORDINATOR

Hello hello! My name is Ian Latimer, and I'm an upcoming senior from Santa Rosa, CA. I'm an International Political Economy major with an emphasis in Global Development, and a minor in Politics and Government. I also occupy my time by singing in the Garden Level a cappella group, and by coordinating the University's Campus Visit Program. I'm hoping to pursue a career in development economics after I graduate, but in the mean time I am incredibly excited for senior year and for orientation! 

ilatimer@pugetsound.edu

What's your most vivid memory from Orientation?

My most vivid memory from Orientation would have to be my Urban Plunge to Mother Earth Farm, out in Puyallup, for a few reasons. First, I didn't really have much of a background in gardening or farming, so it was really interesting to learn about farming techniques for a variety of fruits and vegetables. Second, I got to take a big ole' bite out of a raw sweet onion, which was delicious and gave me awful breath for the next couple hours. Third, and most importantly, it was very inspirational to spend the day with a nonprofit that donates all of its 150,000 pounds of organically grown food to local food banks. ‚ÄčThe people who run the farm are so devoted to their philanthropic work, and I was happy to be a part of that for a day. 

Who inspires you?

There are two particular recent alumni of the University who, during our time together at Puget Sound, both inspired and mentored me in a number of ways. First, Kyle Long, a former Perspectives Program coordinator, who demonstrated (and continues to embody) the tremendous value of loving one's self and the people that make up one's community. The second, Lee Pennebaker, is an inspiration even to anyone he meets in passing. I've learned beyond measure from his worldly curiosity, and his innate ability to evoke and find passion from the world around him. I've nothing but gratitude for both of these tremendous young men.

What got you involved in Orientation? 

First and foremost, I was drawn to Orientation because of its universality. I was as nervous as anyone when I came to UPS for my first semester in the fall of 2012, and I think that the Orientation process was an amazing and unique opportunity for me to settle down and get acquainted with the new world and people around me. It was impossible for me to act like I knew it all when I was in a new place, and in fact knew very little about where I was and what was to come. Orientation can be a thorough learning experience, and I believe both the leaders and students stand to grow significantly through being involved in the process. 

LINDSEY LONG

 

PERSPECTIVES CO-COORDINATOR

lmlong@pugetsound.edu 

My name is Lindsey and I come from the small, suburban town of Lafayette, CA. I'm studying Music Business and Spanish. I spend most of my days here singing with What She Said, the all treble a cappella group, and the Adelphian Concert Choir. I also maintain a great love for strawberries and the rain of the PNW. 

What's your most vivid memory from Orientation?

While this is probably not the most exciting thing, my most vivid memory is move-in day. I remember I didn't have to move a single box up to my third floor room. I checked in and came back to see all my stuff already taken care of. The moral of this story? Besides the fact that I didn't have to lug a single item,  I just moved in to a place where when things got rough, I could always count on someone to be there for me.

Who inspires you?

Since I was probably in the 4th or 5th grade, I've always looked up to my brother. He was the one who inspired me to pursue my passion for music and theater. I'm extremely proud to see where he is now and he drives me to do everything I do

What got you involved in Orientation?

I've always wanted to get more involved on campus and this was one way of doing it where I could incorporate my love for UPS and the community. I love the way the Orientation program is set up and while I was not the most involved first-year during this week a few years ago, I wanted to speak to those incoming students that were like me. I found my place here at Puget Sound and I continue to learn more about myself throughout all my experiences of Orientation. Orientation can be fun for everyone, you just have to find what works for you. I want Puget Sound to welcome all the incoming students to a place where they can find their own personal niche.  My initial response to this question, however, stems from the convincing of the oh so wonderful Lisa Tucker. 

CARSON LYNESS

PASSAGES CO-COORDINATOR

clyness@pugetsound.edu 

Hello! My name is Carson Lyness and I am from Brighton, Utah. I am majoring in Biology and minoring in Spanish and Environmental Policy and Decision Making. My favorite place to be is in my kayak on a river! I love to travel and have spent time boating and studying in Peru and Costa Rica over the past couple years. But I always come back to my new home in the beautiful state of Washington! The moss and the slugs here are amazing! 

What's your most vivid memory from Orientation?

I played soccer my freshman year so Orientation was not my first time on campus. I had been on campus for a week and had already become part of a small community. But then during Orientation I got to go to Point Defiance with a group of other new students and two orientation leaders. At first, I was not excited because I was taken away from the little bit of comfort I had established on campus with the team. But the experience connected me with the larger community that is Puget Sound. We walked along the beach, played Frisbee in the grass, and saw the beautiful Mt. Rainer. I got to meet new people and hear the different reasons why they came to this University and learn about all the different places they were from. This was the first time I really got to know this new place I had moved into. I realized that the micro-community I had found in the soccer team was just a small part of the entire University community that included all the people and places on and off campus.

Who inspires you? 

My dad inspires me. I am inspired by him even when I am being stubborn and independent and don’t want to admit it. As I was growing up he taught me all I know about rivers. Even as I was learning to row my own boat and paddle my own kayak, I always wanted to follow him because I knew he always took the best lines. On rivers and even with household projects he taught me the beauty of being stubborn and working hard. As a nurse, my dad always has a joke to make a hurt patient smile and is always attentive to each individual patient to make sure they feel comfortable and taken care of. He is not only kind to humans but also taught me from a very young age that it is rude to pick flowers because it is like pulling Mother Nature’s hair. He is also an amazing cook and always makes delicious gourmet dinners. He is a strong believer in “passing it on” and whenever someone does something nice for him he turns around and does something nice for someone else. Overall, there is no one big thing about him that inspires me; it is the combination of so many amazing qualities that makes him such an amazing role model to me.

What got you involved in Orientation?   

Each new student comes to college with a different background and with different fears and excitements about the adventure to come. I wanted to become a leader because I saw that Orientation created both an equal playing field on which new students could experience that they are not the only ones who are scared and excited, and a safe space in which they could realize that they are unique and will not have to conform to someone else’s ideas. I also wanted to be a leader to grow my own leadership skills, build my self-confidence, and become more active on campus. Growing up in the mountains and on rivers I was passionate about the outdoors and their capacity to facilitate learning, adaptability, empathy, and so many other qualities that are important when entering a new community. Therefore, becoming a Passages leader seemed like the perfect way to continue to share my passion for being outside and to hone my own skills, while at the same time introducing new students to this great university. 

 

GRACIE BOBACIE WEBER

PASSAGES CO-COORDINATOR

gweber@pugetsound.edu

Howdy there, my name is Gracie Weber and boy am I stoked for Orientation 2015!! I come from Tulsa, Oklahoma, YEHAW, but spent a lot of my days living in Bemidji, Minnesota, and a year living in Zaragoza, Spain. I love the PNW and Passages. I am studying Physics and plan to go into Agricultural or Mechanical Engineering and work on Urban farming projects. I speak Spanish fluently and my favorite hobby is playing the African drums, djembe mainly. 

What's your most vivid memory from Orientation?

I remember coming to Passages as a freshman thinking I was cooler than everyone here. I had dreadlocks, just came back from living in Spain, and thought I was above everything. Much to my dismay I was quickly humbled by the switchbacks of the Mt. Townsend moderate backpacking trail. I lied and said I had been backpacking before but I had barely been on a long walk in Oklahoma, so the trail was tough and I found myself lagging behind everyone. At the end of the first day I was tired and scared for day two, but found my group and myself getting along so well. We told each other stories and laughed almost all night. I found myself telling them things I didn't normally tell strangers, and realized that we were all uniquely beautiful people. The rest of the trip I found myself learning how to deal with my own emotions and opening up in ways I never had. Passages gave me that. 

Who inspires you?

Babatunde Olatunji is my main inspiration. Like I said, I am an avid African drummer and have been since I was six years old. This man, who passed away in 2003, was at the forefront of bring African drumming to the United States and making it apart of the civil rights movement's culture. He was friends with MLK and Malcolm X, along with many important musicians from that era. He believed we were all one body and one heart, and I firmly believe that. His music has guided me through very tough times and his teachings are very powerful. One of his mantras that I adore goes as follows:

"I am that I am. I am light. I am love. I am joy. I am peace. I am beauty. I am one with Mother Earth. I am one with the Father and his universe. I am one with everything within the reach of my voice. And in this togetherness we ask the Divine Intellegent to eradicate all negatives. From our words. From out hearts. From our minds. And from our actions. And so be it. Ashe, ashe ashe. "

What got you involved in Orientation?

I wanted to share the feeling of community with incoming students. I wanted to be an example of someone who loves the outdoors but isn't the most outdoorsy. I wanted to be an example for students to know that their voices can be and will be heard at this University. I wanted to help make our Orientation program an inspiring, eye opening, and life changing experience for not only incoming students, but also fellow leaders. I wanted to learn and grow, myself, and find out more things about myself that only Passages can allow me to see.