Page 29 - arches_autumn_2012

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27
autumn
2012
arches
NOT EXACTLY THE PICTURE OF THE
PASTORAL RED BARN ON THE FARM
The teaching facility at 21 Acres, in
Woodinville, Wash., is solar powered
and LEED certified.
He understands that reaching his goal could
mean a new generation of competitors for his
food businesses. But he says he believes having
more high-quality, regionally produced specialty
food improves the market for everyone. It allows
people to support local producers and eat better
while making food more sustainable and earth
friendly.
“I don’t want to change your life, but I do
want people to step into that place where they’ll
think first about buying local,” he says. “Why
would someone want to sell something bad?”
Even if he does lose a small amount of busi-
ness, Nelson isn’t worried. He has plenty to do.
In addition to sitting on the 21 Acres board and
running Farmhouse, he continues to do lots
of consulting. Up until this summer he even
went to farmers’ markets several times a week to
sell and encourage people to sample his products.
Woodring still has a booth at Seattle’s Pike Place
Market and other area markets, but Nelson finally
broke down and took on employees to do that for
him. He’s shocked that it took four people to do
what he’d been doing by himself.
He credits some of his success to the freedom he
had to explore and try new things at Puget Sound.
Considering that he used to show up at the Jones
Hall fountain every few days at 3 p.m. to practice
and teach juggling, his time at the college may have
also taught him how to balance his existing respon-
sibilities with whatever new ones he can dream up.
David Volk’s travel and food writing has appeared
in
Seattle
magazine,
Alaska Airlines
magazine, and
many other periodicals. He is the author most recently
of
The Cheap Bastard’s Guide to Seattle.