Geoffrey Proehl

Professor, Theatre Arts
Humanities Program Committee Member

 

Geoff Proehl teaches, dramaturgs, and directs at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington. Prior to Puget Sound, he taught dramaturgy at Villanova University, where he supervised the work of graduate student dramaturgs on university and professional productions. He has published a study of American family drama: Coming Home Again: American Family Drama And The Figure Of The Prodigal (Fairleigh Dickinson, 1997). He contributed to and, with Susan Jonas and Michael Lupu, co-edited Dramaturgy In American Theater: A Source Book (Harcourt Brace, 1997). His essays have appeared in The Encyclopedia of English Studies and the Language Arts, The Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism, Theater Topics, And Canadian Theatre Review. His most recent book Toward a Dramaturgical Sensibility: Landscape and Journey with DD Kugler, Mark Lamos, and Michael Lupu (Fairleigh Dickinson, 2008) received the Outstanding Book Award in 2009 from the Association for Theatre in Higher Education.

Professionally, he has worked with the Guthrie Theatre, Arena Stage, the People's Light and Theatre Company, Tacoma Actors Guild, the Museum of Glass, and the New Harmony Project. As the James M. Dolliver National Endowment for the Humanities Distinguished Professor (2009-2013), he led with Grace Livingston a project focused on engaging creativity, criticism, collaboration, and community through the plays of Suzan-Lori Parks and her contemporaries. He has directed over twenty productions at Stanford, Villanova, and Puget Sound including Angels in America (Part I), The Seagull, Three Sisters, Trip to Bountiful, Our Town, Skin of Our Teeth, As You Like It, Midsummer Night’s Dream, Twelfth Night, and premiers of C. Rosalind Bell’s The New Orleans Monologues (with Grace Livingston as Elaine Madonna Bergeron) and 1620 Bank Street (co-directed and dramaturged with Grace Livingston). Proehl has a BA from George Fox College, an MFA in directing from Wayne State University, and a PhD in directing and dramatic criticism from Stanford University. He was president of Literary Managers and Dramaturgs of the Americas from 1998-2000.