Chemistry

Chemistry Faculty & Staff

Top Row:  Luc Boisvert, Stacia Rink, Sandra Ward, Amanda Furtado, Amy Odegard, Holly Jones, Jo Crane, John Hanson, Steven Neshyba, Jeff Root
Bottom Row:  Dan Burgard, Bob Peaslee, Amanda Mifflin, Heather Gilliland, Megan Gessel, Eric Scharrer, Travis Harris, Jeff Grinstead

About the Department

The Chemistry Department offers a broad-based curriculum designed to meet the needs of a variety of students, from those taking only one or two chemistry courses in order to broaden their liberal arts background to those majoring in chemistry in preparation for a career in the chemical sciences. The department is approved by the American Chemical Society and offers degrees that are appropriate for students interested in careers in chemistry, medicine, dentistry, engineering, science teaching, or any other area where a scientific background would be valuable. Students are encouraged to consult with members of the department as they plan their undergraduate programs and to discuss career options in the sciences.

The expertise of the chemistry faculty covers all five major chemical sub-disciplines: analytical chemistry, biochemistry, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, and physical chemistry. In addition to core courses in these major areas, faculty members teach upper-level courses on a variety of special topics including atmospheric chemistry, computational chemistry, materials chemistry, organic synthesis, and surface chemistry. Faculty members are also engaged in a wide range of research projects and all students seeking the BS degree participate in this research and produce a thesis based on their work.

In addition to being introduced to modern chemical knowledge and the role of chemistry in society, students in chemistry courses learn to think analytically and logically. As students move through upper-level courses, they develop the ability to critically assess work in the field and the attitude necessary to cope with the demands of independent inquiry.

Students completing a chemistry degree are able to:

  1. rationalize and predict chemical behavior based on chemical principles;
  2. apply laboratory methods to investigate chemical phenomena and synthesize compounds in a safe and environmentally responsible manner;
  3. operate modern analytical instruments and interpret the data obtained from these instruments;
  4. use computers for collection and analysis of chemical data and the modeling and visualization of chemical structures and properties;?
  5. communicate effectively in both written and oral forms typical of the chemical literature and professional conferences;
  6. search and use the chemical literature.

Announcements

ALIA CLARK JOINS THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AS A VISITING PROFESSOR

Please welcome Alia Clark, visiting two-year professor who will be joining the Chemistry Department Fall 2016.

MEGAN GESSEL AND DAN BURGARD HAVE RECEIVED A $350,000 NSF MAJOR RESEARCH INSTRUMENTATION GRANT. 

The Chemistry department is receiving funds to purchase a new Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer from the National Science Foundation Major Research Instrumentation Program.  The $350,000 award was received through a grant written by Megan Gessel and Dan Burgard to support research and advanced lab courses at the Puget Sound.


DAN BURGARD AWARDED TWO-YEAR $120K GRANT FROM THE NIH

Project Title: Using Sewers to Understand the Legalized Retail Sales Effects on Marijuana Consumption.
The proposed research aims to address the question of how the retail sales of recreational marijuana affect its consumption and usage trends within a community.  The research will involve measuring the concentration in sewers of the principal metabolite of the main active ingredient of marijuana. To Read More See The News and Events Page.

STEVEN NESHYBA IS SELECTED FOR 2015-16 FULBRIGHT U.S. SCHOLAR GRANT IN CHILE

Project Title: In situ sampling of black carbon in the Chilean Andes.
The project funded by the Fulbright Program contains research and teaching components, both aimed at improving Chile’s infrastructure for predicting and mitigating the effects of climate change. The research component aims at developing a comprehensive understanding of the occurrence and origin of black carbon in the Chilean Andes. To Read More See The News and Events Page.



 

 

AMANDA MIFFLIN AND AMY ODEGARD ARE PROMOTED TO ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AND AWARDED TENURE!

Please join us in congratulating Professors Mifflin and Odegard on this momentous achievement.

 

STEVEN NESHYBA AWARDED $34,000 NSF GRANT SUPPLEMENT (8/28/14)


The Environmental Chemical Sciences Program of the National Science Foundation has recommended funding of a supplementary request submitted by Prof. Neshyba. The award of $34,000 will support a month-long field research campaign in the Chilean Andes to study black carbon in Andean glaciers.  Read the details here.