Course Descriptions

Important note: the following offerings are current as of April 15, 2014. Changes to these offerings may occur, and will be reflected in choices available online through Puget Sound’s advising class selection tool.  Residential seminars (seminars whose students live together on the same floor of a residence hall) are denoted as “RS” in the course title.

Art 102: Principles of 3D Design
(Professor Chad Gunderson)

This course is a comprehensive investigation of contemporary and traditional three-dimensional concepts and processes. Students develop a working understanding of the visual and conceptual vocabulary needed for making and critically assessing three-dimensional form. Projects are designed to provide each student the opportunity to fully develop an understanding and envisioning of space, the autonomous object, the effects of scale, and the relationship of the body to the built environment. The student gains experience in handling both plastic and rigid materials while employing additive and reductive forming practices. In addition to “making”, students engage in research pertaining to the historical development of three-dimensional art and present findings through writing and oral presentation. Critiques also serve as a vehicle to help students learn to critically evaluate their work and that of their peers. Satisfies Artistic Approaches core requirement.

Art 278: Survey of Asian Art;
(Professor Zaixin Hong)

This course is a survey of the major artistic traditions of Asia, primarily of China, India, and Japan, from prehistoric times to the turn of the twentieth century. It examines important monuments and emphasizes the interaction of art and society, specifically, how different artistic styles are tied to different intellectual beliefs, geographical locations, and other historical contexts. The course includes a field trip to the Seattle Asian Art Museum. Satisfies Artistic Approaches core requirement.

Asian Languages and Cultures – see Chinese 101 and Japanese 101

Biology 111: Unity of Life: Molecules, Cells, and Systems
(Professor Andreas Madlung)

This course is designed primarily for potential biology majors and health science students and offers a contemporary approach to the major themes of modern biology. Sub-cellular, cellular, genetic, and physiological aspects of biological systems are explored in the context of the scientific process.  Satisfies Natural Scientific Approaches core requirement.

NOTE: In this and most other laboratory science classes, students meet for a common lecture and then separate into smaller groups for the laboratory activity. Students selecting this class for first-year advising purposes may be assigned to either of the lab sections reserved for advisees.

Biology 112: Diversity of Life 
(Professor Peter Wimberger)

This lecture/laboratory course explores the mechanisms of evolution and the vast diversity of life to which it gave rise. The characteristics that define different groups of organisms, and the evolutionary relationships among these groups are explored. Structure and function relationships are emphasized throughout the course. Laboratory is required. Some labs involve the dissection of plants, animals, and fungi. Some labs may involve the collection and sacrificing of zooplankton and insects as well as the handling of plant and animal parts. The course is intended as the second term course for biology majors and is an appropriate biology course for incoming first-year students who have Advanced Placement credit in biology. Prerequisite: Biology 111 or AP Biology score of 4 or 5. Satisfies Natural Scientific Approaches core requirement.

Business Leadership Seminar
(Professor Nila Wiese)

This course serves as the advising section for students enrolled in the Business Leadership Program (BLP). The Business Leadership Seminar meets between 10-12 times per semester and offers the student an opportunity to network with representatives from regional businesses and to learn how they operate and about their strategies and positioning in the marketplace. Guest speakers in the Business Leadership Seminar also discuss careers in various business fields and functional areas. Speakers present information on current leadership topics and practices and provide a perspective on the theories and tools studied in classes. Some seminars are devoted to the particular needs of a BLP class. Career assessment and leadership activities as well as readings in business topics are required.

NOTE: This special seminar is the first in a series of eight such classes required of all students selected for the Business Leadership Program. Students interested in applying for the program should contact the School of Business and Leadership (253.879.3153). Students already admitted to the BLP should make this their only advising class selection on the Advising and Seminar Selection Questionnaire. Students choosing BUS 101 before formal admission to the program will be assigned to another class. Upon admission, they will be reassigned to BUS 101.

Chemistry 110: Fundamental Chemistry I 
(Professor Luc Boisvert)

This class is the first in a two-semester, introductory course designed to give a solid introduction to chemical principles. The first semester covers topics of atomic structure, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, atomic theory, bonding, intermolecular forces, phase changes, introduction to reactions, gases, and thermodynamics. The course is intended for science majors interested in chemistry, biology, geology, and physics, as well as those planning careers in medicine, dentistry, or engineering. Laboratory sections of the course are reserved for first-year student advising. Satisfies Natural Scientific Approaches core requirement.

Chemistry 115: Chemical Principles
(Professor Eric Scharrer)

This class is the first in a two-semester, introductory chemistry sequence open to well-prepared students, particularly those planning to major in the molecular sciences (chemistry, biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology) or students planning careers in medicine, dentistry, or engineering. Topics include nuclear chemistry, atomic structure, stoichiometry, bonding, intermolecular forces and phase changes, reactions, gases, inorganic chemistry, thermochemistry, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Satisfies Natural Scientific Approaches core requirement.

Chinese 101: Elementary Chinese
(Professor Lo Sun Perry)

Interested in Asian languages and cultures? An advising class in Chinese provides an opportunity both to learn the language in an interactive setting and also to participate in cultural excursions, technological enrichment, and co-curricular events. Students participate actively in class, which emphasizes aural and reading comprehension, writing, and especially speaking. Students interested in enrolling in Chinese 101 need not have previous knowledge of the language chosen; all 101-level language courses assume no prior knowledge of the language. Students with two years or more of high school language will be evaluated on an individual basis by faculty and placed at an appropriate level. Students with any previous experience in a language should not be deterred from signing up for an advising section, even if they are concerned that the section offered is not at their level. Advisors will assist students in moving to a higher level course during Orientation or anytime during the first four weeks of class, while keeping the same advising assignment.

NOTE: If you have questions about placement, or if you believe your background will be difficult to assess (either because of unusual coursework or experience abroad), you may phone either the Asian studies department (253.879.3745) or the Office of Academic Advising (253.879.3250) for a preliminary answer to your questions. In most cases, you will meet with an advisor to find an appropriate placement during Orientation Week or in the first week of classes.

Classics 211: Ancient Greece
(Professor William Barry)

This course makes an odyssey through Greek political, social, cultural, and economic history from the Bronze Age (c. 1200 BCE) to the death of Alexander the Great (323 BCE). The emphasis is less on the chronicle of events than on understanding the changing nature of Greek society during this period. Major topics to be explored include the development of the city-state as a political unit; notions of equality in ancient Greece; and the simultaneous flourishing of the arts and building of an empire at Athens under Pericles. Students learn to use both archaeological remains and literary texts, including histories and poetry, to reconstruct the nature of Greek society. Satisfies Humanistic Approaches core requirement.

Communication Studies 170: Introduction to Media Studies: Governmentality and Torture
(Professor Derek Buescher)

This course introduces the discipline of Communication Studies through the allied fields of media and cultural studies. Students gain foundational understanding in methods and critical approaches to contemporary media. The course begins with a survey of media structures and institutions (questions of media role in democracy), media texts and genres (questions of media form), and media and identity (questions of representation). The course transitions from this overview into topical or thematic views of media. Topics may include: (1) representation and ideology with attention to race and gender; (2) trauma and torture pre and post 9-11; (3) memories of war, trauma, and immigration with attention to imperialism, race, and gender; (4) media and social/economic systems; (5) public sphere deliberation and media as democratic processes; or (6) Disney Culture. Satisfies Humanistic Approaches core requirement.

Computer Science 161: Introduction to Computer Science
(Professor Adam Smith)

This course is an introduction to computer science and programming. The programming language Java is used to illustrate concepts in computer science. The course emphasizes the use of the computer as a problem-solving tool and the development of good programming style. CSCI 161 is the introductory course for students planning to major or minor in computer science. A weekly laboratory is required. Satisfies Mathematical Approaches core requirement.

Economics 170: Contemporary Economics
(Professor Andrew Monaco)
(Professor Garrett Milam)

This course is a one-semester introduction to economics covering topics in both micro- and macroeconomics. Topics in microeconomics will include the functioning of the market system and theories of consumer and business decision-making in a world of limited resources. The concepts of opportunity cost, efficiency, and market failure will be developed, as will a consideration of the wisdom and efficacy of government intervention in the market process. Topics in macroeconomics will include the theory of national income determination and the associated concepts of inflation and unemployment. Fiscal and monetary policy and institutions through which those policies are carried out will also be developed. An introduction to international trade theory and foreign exchange markets will complete the course.  Satisfies Social Scientific Approaches core requirement.

Introduction to English Studies
(Professor Tiffany MacBain)

This course serves as an introduction to the English major; as such it provides a broad basis for the study of literature through reading, analyzing, and writing about a variety of literary and non-literary texts. Through close readings of poetry, fiction, drama, memoirs, and film, as well as literary criticism, students develop a critical vocabulary and interpretive frameworks for further reading and writing about literature. Students are also introduced to basic literary research tools. Course content varies by instructor, but all sections include attention to the work of Shakespeare.

Introduction to Environmental Policy and Decision Making (RS)
(Professor Daniel Sherman)

This is the required introductory course for the environmental policy and decision making minor, an interdisciplinary program designed to help students integrate their major area of study with an understanding of how individual and collective decisions interact with the environment. The course uses approaches from the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities to introduce the ways in which human social, political, economic, and cultural systems interact with systems in the nonhuman environment. The concept of “sustainability” is explored by considering the tension between the limiting principles in our world and competing human values over the question of what should be sustained for the future.

French 201: Intermediate French
(Professor Steve Rodgers)

Interested in French language and culture? An advising course in French provides an opportunity both to learn the language in an interactive setting and also to participate in cultural excursions, technological enrichment, and co-curricular events. This course aims to develop oral and written fluency with contextualized, meaningful, and communicative activities, including study of films, multimedia and contemporary texts. Special emphasis is on acquiring the ability to use French in conversational situations, consolidating and expanding familiarity with previously studied grammatical forms, and developing vocabulary. The class taught in French. Students with any previous experience in a language should not be deterred from signing up for an advising section, even if they are concerned that the section offered is not at their level. Advisors will assist students in moving to a higher level course during Orientation or anytime during the first four weeks of class, while keeping the same advising assignment. Students with three or more years of high school language should enroll in the 201 level unless otherwise determined by faculty evaluation. Students with advanced preparation, including those who have taken Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate Higher Level courses, should enroll in courses above the intermediate level. Satisfies Foreign Language graduation requirement.

NOTE: If you have questions about placement, or if you believe your background will be difficult to assess (either because of unusual coursework or experience abroad), you may phone either the French Studies department (253.879.3186) or the Office of Academic Advising (253.879.3250) for a preliminary answer to your questions. In most cases, you will meet with an advisor to find an appropriate placement during Orientation Week or in the first week of classes.

Geology 101: Physical Geology
(Professor Mike Valentine)

Physical geology is a survey of the physical processes operating on and in the earth and the results of these processes through time. Topics covered range in scale from the atomic to the galactic. The formation of the minerals and lavas, types of volcanoes, and the creation of sedimentary and metamorphic rocks make up the first third of the course; this introduces the materials of the earth. The course next covers large-scale topics, such as the age of the earth, earthquakes and their resultant damage, how continents and seafloors are created, a brief history of the world, and an outline of the great unifying theory of geology, plate tectonics. The last third of the course discusses how surface processes, such as streams, wind, waves, and changes in the environment affect the deserts, glaciers, shorelines, and groundwater, and how these changes affect our way of life. Includes a laboratory. Credit will not be given for both GEOL 101 and 104. Satisfies Natural Scientific Approaches core requirement.

German 201: Intermediate German
(Professor David Tinsley)

Interested in German language and culture? An advising course in German provides an opportunity both to learn the language in an interactive setting and also to participate in cultural excursions, technological enrichment, and co-curricular events. Special emphasis is on acquiring the ability to use German in conversational situations, consolidating and expanding familiarity with previously studied grammatical forms, and developing vocabulary proficiency in key areas essential for university study in Germany or Austria; therefore, the class taught in German. Students with any previous experience in a language should not be deterred from signing up for an advising section, even if they are concerned that the section offered is not at their level. Advisors will assist students in moving to a higher level course during Orientation or anytime during the first four weeks of class, while keeping the same advising assignment. Students with three or more years of high school language should enroll in the 201 level unless otherwise determined by faculty evaluation. Students with advanced preparation, including those who have taken Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate Higher Level courses, should enroll in courses above the intermediate level. Satisfies Foreign Language graduation requirement.

NOTE: If you have questions about placement, or if you believe your background will be difficult to assess (either because of unusual coursework or experience abroad), you may phone either the German Studies department (253.879.3186) or the Office of Academic Advising (253.879.3250) for a preliminary answer to your questions. In most cases, you will meet with an advisor to find an appropriate placement during Orientation Week or in the first week of classes.

History 152: American Experiences I: Origins to 1877
(Professor William Breitenbach)

This course explores the experiences and values of America’s diverse peoples. Students in it not only expand their knowledge of events of American history but also deepen their understanding of the meaning of those events in people’s lives. Students learn how the social categories of race, gender, and class affected individual Americans’ identities and opportunities; how America’s natural environment shaped and was shaped by Americans’ human culture; and how Americans’ ideas and ideals both influenced and reflected their economic, political, and social institutions. To investigate these themes, students read writings by modern historians and analyze a wide variety of historical sources from the past. American Experiences I focuses on the period from European colonization through the end of Reconstruction. Satisfies Humanistic Approaches core requirement.

Honors advising

Honors students will choose a section of SS1-1 195: New World Rhetorics during Orientation, and advising will be coordinated through this class enrollment. NOTE: Honors Program students are chosen by the Honors Committee. Any first-year student who is interested in the program and who has not already expressed that interest to the Office of Admission is encouraged to apply by writing to the Office of Admission, in care of the Honors Program.

Japanese 101: Elementary Japanese
(Professor Mikiko Ludden)

Interested in Asian languages and cultures? An advising classes in Japanese provides an opportunity both to learn the language in an interactive setting and also to participate in cultural excursions, technological enrichment, and co-curricular events. Students participate actively in classes, which emphasize aural and reading comprehension, writing, and especially speaking. Students interested in enrolling in Japanese 101 need not have previous knowledge of the language chosen; all 101-level language courses assume no prior knowledge of the language. Students with two years or more of high school language will be evaluated on an individual basis by faculty and placed at an appropriate level. Students with any previous experience in a language should not be deterred from signing up for an advising section, even if they are concerned that the section offered is not at their level. Advisors will assist students in moving to a higher level course during Orientation or anytime during the first four weeks of class, while keeping the same advising assignment.

NOTE: If you have questions about placement, or if you believe your background will be difficult to assess (either because of unusual coursework or experience abroad), you may phone either the Asian Studies department (253.879.2995) or the Office of Academic Advising (253.879.3250) for a preliminary answer to your questions. In most cases, you will meet with an advisor to find an appropriate placement during Orientation Week or in the first week of classes.

Latin American Studies 100: Introduction to Latin American Studies
(Professor Monica DeHart)

This course introduces students to the history, literature, and culture of the different Latin American regions. It examines the products of individual and collective experience and creativity in a variety of ways. Using historical and anthropological texts, the course provides a brief overview of historical periods and legacies, and considers how anthropologists have understood the cultures of urban and rural, racial and ethnic existence. In addition, using a series of literary works, students reflect on the cultural and national identity, moral and religious values, and individual experience of Latin Americans as well as the cultural, intellectual, and linguistic influence of these people in the United States. Classes are organized around discussion and occasional presentations by guest speakers. In addition to exams, students write several short evaluations of readings and are involved in several group presentation projects. The course serves as a required introduction to the Latin American Studies minor. Satisfies Humanistic Approaches core requirement.

Mathematics 160: Introduction to Applied Statistics
(Professor Matthew Pickard)

This course provides an introduction to statistics, concentrating on statistical concepts and the “why and when” of statistical methodology. The course focuses on learning to ask appropriate questions, collect data effectively, summarize and interpret information, and understand the limitations of statistical inference. Satisfies Mathematical Approaches core requirement.

Mathematics 180: Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
(Professor Rob Beezer)

There are two main topics in the calculus for functions of one variable: differentiation and integration. This course focuses on differentiation starting with limits and continuity, then introduces the derivative, and applications of the derivative in a variety of contexts. The course concludes with and introduction to integration. The central ideas are explored from the symbolic, graphic, numeric, and physical model points of view. Satisfies Mathematical Approaches core requirement.

Mathematics 181: Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
(Professor James Bernard)

This class focuses on integration and its relation to differentiation. Topics include definite integrals, anti-derivatives, the Fundamental Theorems of Calculus, applications of integration, sequences, and series. The central ideas are explored from the symbolic, graphic, numeric, and physical model points of view. Satisfies Mathematical Approaches core requirement.

NOTE: Students who have taken a yearlong high school course in calculus (particularly those who have earned a score of 3 or better on the AP Calculus AB exam) are encouraged to begin college mathematics with Math 181.

Music 103: First Year Theory
(Professor Gwynne Brown)
(Professor Robert Hutchinson)

Designed to be taken together, this course along with Music 101 constitutes the first semester of music theory required of all music majors and prospective music majors. Music 101 (Aural) includes development of skills in sight singing, melodic and harmonic dictation, transcription, and keyboard harmony to improve overall musicianship and comprehension of music theory and literature. Music 103 (Notation) includes an introduction to the fundamentals of music theory: scales, key signatures, intervals, triads, seventh chords, harmonic function and progression, four-part voice leading, and period forms. Also included is the creation of an original composition.

NOTE: Students planning to take Music Theory 1 must complete a proficiency exam before enrolling, and to do so must contact Robert Hutchinson for an access code to register for the exam. Students planning or contemplating a major in music should be sure to make arrangements for the required proficiency exam, perform an audition for the major (if one has not already been completed), and request First Year Theory as one of their four advising class choices. Students considering a music major who have Advanced Placement credit for music theory should also request this advising class; a music advisor will assist them in determining an appropriate theory placement.

Occupational Therapy 101: Introduction to Allied Health Care Professions
(Professor Martins Linauts)
(Professor George Tomlin)

This nontraditional advising section (offered for .25 units of credit) is for students interested in exploring the fields of occupational therapy and physical therapy in addition to the liberal arts and sciences. There will be three major objectives in the course: 1) to define the roles and functions of occupational therapists and physical therapists in a variety of settings, 2) to explore current issues in U.S. health care delivery, and 3) to explore students’ alternative academic interests to ensure that their courses of study will be chosen in a well-informed and considered way.

NOTE: This course is not required for either the OT or the PT program, nor will it meet any requirements for those degrees.

Philosophy 101: Introduction to Philosophy
(Professor Douglas Cannon)

Representative philosophical topics, such as mind and body, the grounds of knowledge, the existence of God, moral obligation, political equality, and human freedom, are discussed in connection with major figures in the philosophical tradition originating in ancient Greece (e.g., Socrates, Plato, Descartes, Hume, Rousseau, and Nietzsche) and with contemporary philosophers who are heirs to that tradition. Satisfies Humanistic Approaches core requirement.

Physics 121: General University Physics
(Professor Amy Spivey)

This course addresses the fundamental principles and applications of mechanics, gravitation, and wave motion treated with the use of differential and integral calculus. Prerequisite or co-requisite: MATH 180 or equivalent. It is the first in a two-semester sequence intended primarily for prospective science majors and for those intending to pursue pre-engineering programs. The advising section will be affiliated with a laboratory group of this class. Satisfies Natural Scientific Approaches core requirement.

Politics and Government 101: Introduction to U. S. Politics
(Professor Robin Jacobson)

This course introduces students to the institutions and processes of U. S. politics. It covers all of the fundamental principles and important decision makers, giving to students the necessary breadth and understanding to take more advanced and more specialized courses. In addition, it prepares students to evaluate the guiding values of the polity, both in theory and in practice. Satisfies Social Scientific Approaches core requirement.

Politics and Government 102: Introduction to Comparative Politics
(Professor Patrick O’Neil)

How do we understand the fall of Apartheid in South Africa, the rise of Islamic Fundamentalism in Iran, the troubles of Russia’s post-Communist regime, and China’s attempt to blend communism with capitalism? This course provides students with the tools to understand these and other questions about how politics works around the globe. The study of comparative politics focuses on the basic foundations of political life and how these institutions differ in form and power around the world. This introductory course deals with such central concepts as nation and state, citizenship and ethnicity, political ideology, religious fundamentalism, revolution, terrorism and political violence, the relationship between politics and markets, democracy and authoritarianism, electoral systems and different forms of representation, development and globalization. These concepts are investigated through a number of country case studies, which may include the United Kingdom, Japan, Russia, China, Iran, India and South Africa, among others. Satisfies Social Scientific Approaches core requirement.

Psychology 101: Introductory Psychology
(Professor Erin Colbert-White)
(Professor Sarah Moore)

Humans are complex organisms, and psychology provides a rich, interdisciplinary understanding of the study of mental life, experience, and behavior. Through this course, students develop an appreciation for these complexities by focusing on individual and social behavior, as well as the physiological and neurological processes underlying them. Central to this course is an understanding of the diverse methods, experimental designs, foundational theories, and research used to inform the various sub-disciplines in psychology. Topics frequently covered in this survey course include: research methods; sensation and perception; learning and memory; and developmental, personality, abnormal, and social psychology.

Religion 265: Thinking Ethically
(Professor Judith Kay)

This course provides students with tools of ethical analysis so that they can think critically about pressing contemporary moral issues, such as friendship and justice. To narrow the scope, the course focuses on ethical methods from Christianity and western philosophy. Students examine from a multicultural perspective the long-standing philosophical treatment of friendship as a virtue and the Christian challenge to that idea. Are friendships suspect because they are based on preference rather than universal love? Students then explore what being an ally entails in the context of white supremacy. The course then turns to healthcare justice in a global context. Students examine four different models of justice and their implications for healthcare policy. Finally, students address the moral significance of the past for what they ought to do today. Other nations have taken on the tasks of reparative justice in response to mass murder and tyranny. What might reparative justice mean for U.S. citizens given their history of genocide and slavery? Should those who bear no direct liability for past wrong be the ones to make things right? Is justice possible? Satisfies the Humanistic Approaches core requirement.

Spanish 101: Elementary Spanish (Professor David Hanson)
Spanish 201: Intermediate Spanish (Professor Mark Harpring)

Interested in Spanish language and cultures? Advising classes in Spanish provide an opportunity to develop greater proficiency in these languages, learn about the social, cultural, and political contexts of the countries in which these languages are spoken, and participate in cultural activities and co-curricular events. Students participate actively in language classes, which are taught almost exclusively in the target language and emphasize aural and reading comprehension, writing, and, especially, speaking. Students interested in enrolling in a foreign language advising class need not have previous knowledge of the language chosen; all 101-level language courses assume no prior knowledge of the language. Students with three or more years of high school language should enroll in the 201 level unless otherwise determined by faculty evaluation. Students with advanced preparation, including those who have taken Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate Higher Level courses, should enroll in courses above the intermediate level, as determined by consultation with faculty in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literature. Students with any level of previous experience in a language should not be deterred from signing up for an advising section. Advisors will assist students in moving either to a higher- or lower-level course during Orientation or anytime during the first four weeks of class, while keeping the same advising assignment.

NOTE: If you have questions about placement, or if you believe your background will be difficult to assess (either because of unusual coursework or experience abroad), you may phone either the Department of Hispanic Studies (253.879.3186) or the Office of Academic Advising (253.879.3250) for a preliminary answer to your questions.In most cases, you will meet with an advisor to find an appropriate placement during Orientation Week or in the first week of classes.

Theatre Arts 275: The Theatrical Experience
(Professor Jess Smith)

In this course, students explore the aesthetics and traditions of the theatrical art form through studies in acting, directing, design, playwriting, dramaturgy, spectatorship, and theater history. Students encounter the diversity and complexity of the theater-making process by way of readings, lectures, discussions, play going, and workshop performances of scenes. Using critical and analytical tools studied over the course of the semester, students learn ways of exploring the theatrical experience both orally and in writing. Satisfies Artistic Approaches core requirement.

NOTE: The Seminars in Scholarly Inquiry I (SSI-1) below are advising seminars – students will fulfill two requirements (advising and seminar) with one course of SSI-1.

Seminar in Scholarly Inquiry-1 112: Salsa, Samba, and Soccer: Popular Culture in Latin America (RS)
(Professor John Lear)

This course considers the intersections of gender, race, and class in the production of popular culture as an introduction to, and a way to understand, Latin America, and as a vehicle for students to develop essential skills by examining a variety of sources and developing and supporting arguments in class and on paper. Beginning with introductory historical and theoretical frameworks, students examine a variety of contemporary forms of popular culture: popular religious symbols and rituals, secular festivals, music, dance, food, and sports. Students explore the tensions between elite and popular cultures; popular culture as a resistance or opposition; attempts by the state to manage popular culture as a symbol of national identity or a form of social control; the relation of popular culture to mass and commercial culture; and the migrations of cultural forms between Latin American countries and the rest of the world. The final project is a substantive paper based on independent research. Affiliate program: Latin American Studies.

Seminar in Scholarly Inquiry-1 122: Ectopia? Landscape, History, and Identity in the Pacific Northwest
(Professor Doug Sackman)

In his novel Ectopia, Ernest Callenbach envisioned Northern California, Oregon, and Washington separating from the USA to become a breakaway “green” republic. Using this vision of the Northwest as a sustainable society as a touchstone, this course explores the multifaceted relationship between human identity and landscape (or place) in the region over the last century. Probing historical documents, visual representations, and literature, students investigate how different peoples have encountered, experienced, and represented the environment in the Pacific Northwest and how, in turn, the environment has shaped their sense of who they are. Additional topics may include the wilderness idea, globalization, and the way that social divisions such as gender and race have intersected with the process of making and re-making places in the region. Affiliate department: History.

Seminar in Scholarly Inquiry-1 134: Dreams and Desire – The Liminal World
(Professor Ann Putnam)

The theme of this course is the exploration of the liminal world – the terrain for which there is evidence but no proof. For example, what do religion, anthropology, philosophy, medicine, psychology, and literature have to say about the seen and the unseen, the threshold between life and death--issues that shoot to the core of human existence and exert the strongest hold on the human spirit? Students explore the validity of claims about belief and unbelief, the world beyond the senses, made by prophets, priests, poets, shamans, scientists, philosophers. As both writers and speakers, students construct persuasive arguments based on an evaluation of sources that either contradict or defend given assumptions about the role of liminality in culture, history, identity, and the natural world. Students begin with texts that insist upon controversial readings, such as Toni Morrison's Beloved, Louis Owen's Wolfsong, and Isabel Allende's The House of the Spirits. Affiliate department: English.

Seminar in Scholarly Inquiry-1 141: Architectures of Power
(Professor Mita Mihato)

Using words as its building blocks instead of bricks or stones, writing has power to evoke or create socially-coded (and sometimes socially subversive) meanings for its readers. The title of this seminar, "Architectures of Power," suggests that there is some kind of mechanism, be it actual or theoretical, that structures power and one's ability to act effectively. Focusing on the power dynamics that structure writing, cultural interactions, and individual mindsets, this course is composed of a series of units that, building on one another, move students from the basic questions one asks of writing to more complex written assignments that require integration of a number of provided source materials. In analyzing a variety of texts (linguistic, visual, and even aural), students explore, develop, and analyze the kinds of social and communicative powers that writing can construct. Affiliate department: English.

Seminar in Scholarly Inquiry-1 143: Controversies of Communication and Technology
(Professor Nicholas Brody)

This course explores controversies as they relate to technology and communication. Technology is now a pervasive aspect of daily life. Some technology-related discussion topics include online privacy, cyberbullying, anonymity, surveillance, trolling, and online dating. In addition to reading about developing and structuring arguments, students view relevant media and read popular press and academic articles about the various issues relating to technology and communication. In the process of examining these controversies, students encounter the two central aspects of the humanistic tradition of rhetorical education: argumentation and effective oral and written expression. Students engage in a variety of activities and exercises and prepare a final paper designed to develop their fluency in written composition and oral expression. Affiliate department: Communication Studies.

Seminar in Scholarly Inquiry-1 165: Never Really Alone – Symbioses and Parasitism Around and Within Us
(Professor Mark Martin)

This course seeks to explore the prevalence, impact, and history of the associations between organisms (including human beings), from the very large to the microscopic, throughout the biosphere. There is a growing paradigm shift in science that places diverse associations between organisms as central to evolutionary theory and life on Earth: not so much competition among organisms but complex “networking” between them. Various relationships between organisms will be examined through this metaphorical lens, ranging from crustaceans that replace the tongues of fish, nematode worms that alter the behavior of the insects that host them, the tiny “wildlife” that lives on and within human beings, bacteria that help feed plants or insects cooperatively, and the fact that life as known on Earth has resulted from ancient symbioses. In this context, some associations to be discussed are mutualistic and benefit both “partners,” while other associations are far more graphically one-sided. Using this intellectual framework, students will develop skills in evaluating, discussing, and presenting concepts relating to symbioses and parasitism, from historical, philosophical, and scientific viewpoints. These skills will include the evaluation of popular scientific articles (as well as social media, television, and journalistic sources) and the ability to seek out and analytically read scientific and scholarly journal articles. Student learning outcomes for this course will include: effective classroom discussion and evaluation of assigned material, creation of a class “blog” with student generated entries, and short written reports on individual symbiotic or parasitic associations. Each student will create an end of semester project exploring one such association in depth as a well-crafted and scaffolded term paper as well as a PowerPoint oral presentation to the class. Affiliate department: Biology.

Seminar in Scholarly Inquiry-1 172: The Scientific and Romantic Revolutions (RS)
(Professor George Erving)

This course explores the causes and consequences of two decisive turning points in Western civilization—the Scientific Revolution of the 16th and 17th centuries, and the Romantic movement of the late-18th and early 19th centuries. The course aims to understand these periods of upheaval in their political, religious, economic, scientific, and aesthetic dimensions, and to discover how their legacy continues to inform the relationship between science and art. Affiliate program: Humanities.