1980s

1980
Board revises bylaws so that trustees are elected independently rather than by the conference.

First endowed chair established: George F. Jewett Distinguished Professorship in Business.

To meet immediate demands for housing, board authorizes construction of additional A-frames.

Board votes to move ahead with Law School despite $1.1 million in costs not anticipated in original budget. Norton Clapp Law Center dedicated.

University staff votes on forming a labor union. V.P. Ray Bell meets with plant development staff to address grievances. No union formed. Endowment reaches $13 million.

1981
Board approves new Student Conduct Code.

Incoming freshman average SAT score is 989.

Board mandates exploration of participation in a regional athletics conference as a less costly alternative to NCAA Division II; eliminates no-need scholarships except for basketball and swimming (men's and women's).

1982
Board makes president of alumni association ex officio member of the Executive Committee in equal status to Faculty Senate Chair and ASUPS president.

Tenzler Hall renamed University Hall at request of donor.

Student Media Board created.

KUPS increased to 100 watts.

Percentage of liberal arts majors reaches 50 percent for the first time.

1983
First John Lantz Fellow named (continuing program). Philip M. Phibbs Distinguished Professorship in Politics and Government established.

Board and ASUPS agree to co-sponsor a four-year scholarship for a black South African student in response to apartheid.

White paper on the co-curricular program launches new attention on campus life.

President's house receives new carpets and drapes, first refurbishment since 1950.

Total financial aid exceeds $10 million for first time.

Telephone solicitation program for Annual Fund gifts begins.

1984
University returns to a semester calendar with an earlier start date to allow the fall semester to end before Christmas.

Trustees initiate deferred freshmen residence for Greek houses, with trial period during which Greek chapters had to prove freshman rush did not impede a "common freshman experience."

Board approves new co-curricular programs.

Alumni Sharing Knowledge (ASK) program begins.

1985
Student Conduct Code revised as University Honor Code.

University granted Phi Beta Kappa chapter (November).

Mott Greene hired with tenure as first John Magee Professor.

Nat S. and Marian W. Rogers Professorship in Applied Management established.

Robert Albertson named Washington Professor of the Year by the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education (CASE).

Four sorority chapter rooms move from student union building.

Prelude and Passages student orientation program begins.

University joins Independent Colleges of Washington, a fundraising consortium.

Lowry Wyatt named "Volunteer of the Year" by CASE.

"On the frontier of leadership" adopted as the theme for the centennial celebration.

Puget Sound Associates, young alumni group, begins.

1986
Norton Clapp steps down as board chair after 19 years. Lowry Wyatt assumes chair. Board approves plan to reduce enrollment to 2,660.

Burlington Northern Foundation gift establishes endowed faculty development fund.

The Physical Therapy department begins to offer only a Master of Physical Therapy degree.

Elizabeth Cousens '87 becomes second Rhodes scholar.

Student union building renovated, adding Rasmussen Rotunda.

Hewlett Foundation grants presidential discretionary fund.

1987
Summer science research program for students begins with gift from Murdock Trust.

Thompson Hall renovated.

Board affirms by resolution that the new humanities building is the institution's highest priority.

Total number of freshmen from outside Washington exceeds 50 percent for the first time.

Board resolution objects to the Higher Education Coordinating (HEC) Board plan to build a public undergraduate institution in Pierce County.

1988
Board approves new campus master plan.

Deferred rush begins.

Community Involvement and Action Center (CIAC) initiated.

Board agrees to allow alcohol to be served at an event in the student union building.

Incoming freshman average SAT score is 1073.

University holds 100th birthday party on March 17. Centennial Campaign officially ends (August 31) with $47.6 million.

All athletic programs finally affiliated with NAIA.

1989
University re-accredited by Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges.

Faculty makes major revision to the Core Curriculum (writing in the major requirement added).

Freshman-to-senior retention exceeds 70 percent for the first time.

First director of alumni relations hired.

Bethel Schneebeck Organ donated.

Air Force ROTC detachment closed because of budget constraints.